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Full text of "Sponsor"




-— ' 



mm maasm cow 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
,0 ROcSaUB flAZ*. NEW *«. * 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor131426spon 



A APRIL 1959 
40« ■ copy • S8 a ytar 




..Helps ESSO Dealers Turn Prospects into 
ustomers...", says McConn-Erickson's Sy Go/d/s 



In the picture above, Sy Goldis, Broadcast Supervisor of 

IcCann-Erickson, discusses the breadth, scope and buying 

power of the astounding $2 3 A Billion WSMpire with 

Ed Whitley of John Blair and Company. 

ccording to Sy, "WSM helps ESSO dealers turn prospects 
nto customers in the Central South." His contention that 
it is "impossible to cover the South without WSM" 
xplains why McCann-Erickson beams three daily editions 
f your ESSO Reporter, six days weekly, to the WSMpire. 

Want to turn the millions of prospects in America's L3th 

largest radio market into your customers? It's simple. 
See Bob Cooper or any Blair Man. 

I AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCID 



HOW TO CLEAN 
UP SPOT'S 
PAPER JUNGLE 

sponsor digs into tin- 
maze of paperwork 
problems media men 
face in buying -pot 



WSM 

Radio 

Key to America's 
13th Radio Market 

50 000 Watts • Clear Channel 

Blair Represented 

Bob Cooper Gen. Mgr 



ENT INSURANCE COMPANV 



What an account 
man should know 
about air media 

Page 34 

New Nielsen study 
sheds light on tv's 
summer video dip 

Page 36 

One P. R. Man's 
Image' plan 

A SPONSOR spoofer 

Page 42 



When KSTP-TV 
says go out 
and buy it" . . . 

people go out 
and buy it! 




CHANNEL 



100,000 
WATTS 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. P 

m /!/<H&Uite4t4- lead*? 9tofo*C 



Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



SILENT SERVICE I climbed out of its CNP cradle two years ago, and hasn't stopped climbing since. Taking 

all of its Top-25-Market ratings, SILENT SERVICE'S latest ARB average is up -' V ■ over the series' initial 

average. ■ DANGER IS MY BUSINESS premiered last Ju 1 it ARB nbc television films 

average among the Top 25 Markets: up 16% over its first rating average! 

■ FLIGHT, CNP's newest, only dates back to this past October. Latest 

ARB average among the Top 25 Markets: up 11% over its first rating 

average! ■ The longer CNP shows are on the air, the more people like them. California national productions, inc 



NBC TELEVISION FILMS A division OF 

CNP 





c / ol. 13, Vo. // 



4 April 1959 



M 



R 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Spot: media's paperwork jungle 

3X I'"' -' lomplicaii-il. time-consuming medium to buy, spot all but de- 
feats its own sales point of flexibility. How do buyers view the situation? 

What an account man should know about air media 

34 V.p. and account supervisor, Leo Rosenberg of Foote, Cone & Belding gives 
rundown on what large, >mall agency a.e.'s need to know about tv/radio 

New life for radio's "dead" hours 

36 Post-midnight radio (alreadj a proven -ales medium) has gotten new 
impetus from direct mail cost increases. Here's how to sell after midnight 

New light on video's summer dip 

38 Some popular notions are bound to be exploded by latest Nielsen study. 
Shows weekly cume audience in summer is only l'< under winter level 

ANPA study shot full of holes 

41 Bureau of Advertising claims spot radio reaches small part of potential. 
I IK research director counters with similar charge about newspaper ads 

The Thinker: P.R. variety 

42 SPONSOR spoofs the current tv program furor with an exchange between 
agency president and his public relations firm of Winken, Blinken & Nod 

Easy reference "avail" sheet 

44 ^' !( Spol Sales refashions its availabilities form to include complete 
program information, coverage maps, even information about packages 

How to get mileage out of a tv mistake 

44 Flashy, expen-i\e lemoie* seemed a jmml »,» to move merchandise to 
ibis appliance dealer until he found a steadier, more efficient way to do it 

sponsor asks: What was your reaction to the NAB 
convention? 

50 ^ ith more membet -tations than ever before brought together at the 
NAB convention station people report what thej feel was accomplished 



FEATURES 

58 I ilin Si "i" 

24 I'M 1 1 and Madison 

62 \, ■»- S U' i W rap I p 

8 Newsm ikei "l the W eek 

62 I'ii Inn \\ lap-Up 

48 Radio Ri suite 

20 Sponsoi Bai i-tage 

60 Sponsoi lb ii - 



13 SpoiiMii Scope 

72 SpoiiMii Speak* 

28 Spol Buys 

72 Ten Second Spots 

6 I imebuyers at \\ "ik 

70 l\ and Radio Newsmakers 

57 Washington Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodoc 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 
Contributing Editor 
Joe Csida 
Art Editor 
Mauiy Kurtz 
Production Editor 
Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Viskniskki, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiqqins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Dorris Bowers, Administrative Mqr. 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mqr. 

Georqe Becker: Charles Echart; Gilda 

Gomez; Priscilla Hoffman; Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



GS1 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
i49 b Madisonl New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave Phone: Superior 7-9863. 
Birmingham Office: Town House. Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. 
Printing Office: 3)10 Elm Ave.. Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $8 a year. Canada b 
other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a year. 
Other Foreign Countries $11 per year. Single 
copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all cor- 
respondence to 40 E. 49th St.. N. Y. 17. N. Y 
MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by SPON- 
SOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at 
Baltimore, Md. 

"59 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



THE 



AND 



ALLEN 



SHOW 



Running 

Rings 

Around 

All 

Competition ! 



NO. l 

SYNDICATED, 
COMEDY! 



/s 






n* 



ti««*i 



S\WN* 



ks m 



%M* 



^\tsfts\«* 



,vieT* 



per 



. Pro*'*" 



i 1* 



\^9^ 



ALREADY SOLD IN 96 MARKETS... 

FOR FULL DETAILS ON THESE 239 & ROLLICKING HALF-HOURS ... CALL 

SCREENMGEMS 

TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES 

NEW YORK • DETROIT • CHICAGO • HOUSTON • HOLLYWOOD • ATLANTA • TORONTO 



Selling 
for: 

• S & W FINE FOODS 
> RIVAL 006 FOODS 

i NUCOA MARGARINE 

. HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORP. 

• ST. JOSEPHS ASPIRIN 
LESTOIL 

4-WAY COLD TABLETS.. 
and many other 
blue chip advertisers. 



SPONSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 



summer ' radio goes where 




the family goes 




People do take vacations, anc 
Radio goes along. 

That's why SPOT RADIO is so nec- 
essary in your summer media plans. 

Reach people-wherever they are 
at home or on vacation -with SPOT 
RADIO. 



SPONSORED BY MEMBER FIRMS OF 




Avery-Knodel Inc. — John Blair & Company — Broadcast Time Sale: 

Thomas F. Clark Co. Inc. — Harry E. Cummings — Robert E. Eastman & Co. Inc 

H-R Representatives Inc. — The Katz Agency Inc. — McGavren-Quinn Companj 

The Meeker Company Inc. — Art Moore Associates Inc. — Richard O'Connell Inc 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward. Inc. — William J. Reilly, Inc 

Radio-TV Representatives Inc. — Weed Radio Corporation — Adam Young Inc 



Raleigh-Durham 
the Nation's 




Radio Market 

has Greater 

RETAIL 
SALES 

than the 10th 

Metropolitan 

Market 




28th Radio Market - WPTF 
$2,545,732,000 

28th Metropolitan Market 
$816,675,000 

10th Metropolitan Market 
$2,503,361,000 





Timebuyers 
at work 




Dorothy B. Staff, Lennen & Newell, Los Angeles, feels that buying 
is a process of weighing many factors, rather than placing impor- 
tance, say, on ratings or programing as such. "Once it has been 
decided whom the advertiser wants to reach," Dorothy says, "the 
buyer must study cost, time, ratings, programing, personalities and 
station loyalty. It is the over-all 
picture that counts, and this means 
weighing each consideration 
against the others." Dorothy re- 
cently had to decide between a 
top-rated independent station and 
a much lower-rated one in a mar- 
ket. Bv itself, the top-rated station 
seemed like an excellent buy, but 
when rates were compared, she 
felt that its greater total audience 
did not justify the buy. In addi- 
tion, the smaller independent 
balanced itself out with the type of programing which she thought 
created a stronger listener-loyalty. "All factors."' Dorothy says, 
"should be considered in relation to the others. To make any single 
one a prime consideration is to distort your total perspective." 



Jeff Fine, Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, New York, point- 
out thai when competition, additional money or other factors necessi- 
tate planning a fast campaign, streamlining hasic buying procedure 
can facilitate quick and effective execution. "First."" Jeff sa\s. "be- 
fore even phoning the reps, the media department should prepare a 

complete list of markets it plans to 
use as well as stations most likely 
to he purchased. Second, cut out 
as much market data and rating 
references as you can. and get 
sour availabilities oxer the phone. 
Third, tell the reps how much 
monej you're going to spend in 
each market and probable alloca- 
tion-. Fourth, state your adver- 
tising objectives to the rep. If 
you're going in fast against -(iff 
competition, for example, it V 
bettei to tell the reps frankl) what you're after than Bounder 
around in a moment of emergency. Fifth, the more latitude you give 
the reps the better. There's no time to quibble old tnaidisfil) about 
time segments, so make them .1- flexible as possible without missing 
ili«- client's target. These procedures should get you moving fast." 




Sl'ONSOH 



1 ipril 1959 



who pack a 






D1 CK COVINGTON 



punch 




Some radio stations call them 
announcers. At WITH, we call 
them personalities. The 
difference? First, experience — 

110 years of it, and most 
of it on WITH. Second, 
approach — these men manage to 
put personal selling into 
even a transcribed commercial. 
Third, popularity — each has 
his own big band of fans 
that multiply during our 

24-hour broadcast day. 
The result? PRO-fitable 
PRO-motion of your PRO-duct! 




Tom Tinsley, Pres. 



Radio Baltimore 



R. C. Embry. Vice Pres. 



National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York. Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington 
Clarke Brown Co. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, New Orleans McGavren-Quinn in Chicago, Detroit and West Coast 

Ohio Stations Representatives in the state of Ohio 



SPO.NSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 



BUYING 
DETROIT AND 
SOUTHEAST 
MICHIGAN? 




YOUR BEST BUY 
IN MICHIGAN 
IS NOW A BETTER 
BUY THAN EVER! 

NEW 

TOWER! 

tallest TV tower in south- 
east Michigan 

NEW 

POWER! 

blanketing an even larger 
area with a powerful signal 

NEW 

AUDIENCE! 

wxyz-tv adds new viewers 
running into the hundreds 
of thousands 

NEW 

COVERAGE! 

wxyz adds scores of sub- 
urbs, towns and cities 



Now transmitting from the 
heart of America's fifth market 
. . . center of Southeast 
Michigan's population shift! 

This huge 1 ,073 ft. tower per- 
mits WXYZ-TV to blanket a 
larger area than ever with a 
powerful signal . . . adding 
hundreds of thousands of 
viewers to its coverage area! 
now WXYZ-TV serves more 
people, better ! 



BROADCAST HOUSE— 10 Mile and North- 
walcrn, 14 milct norlhwat of central Dcfroif 



WXYZ-TV 

CHANNEL 
DETROIT i 

Represented Nationally by BLAIR- TV 



:: 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



For 31 years, the Don Lee Network has operated on the W est 
roast as a distinguished program sonrre fostering such tal- 
ent as Pat Weaver, Horace Heidt. Kay Thompson. This past 
week it was bought by ABC, which plans to retain Don Lee 
programs to serve current affiliates and beckon to neic ones. 

The newsmaker: Edward J. DeGray, v.p. in charge of 
ABC's Radio network, signed his long-time hope into reality in nego- 
tiations (for an undisclosed, reportedh token sum i with John Poore, 
v.p. of RKO-Teleradio Pictures. Inc. ABC bought: six 15-minute 
newscasts daily; take-over contracts on the sold-out news shows: time 
clearance on 34 Don Lee stations. ABC's reason for buying: expand 
program service to its Western stations, attract new affiliates. Don 
Lee's reason for selling: adhere to a Booz. Allen. Hamilton edict to 
dispose of the declining - profit 
propertx. I It still owns former key 
network stations KHJ. Los An- 
geles, and KFRC. San Francisco. I 
The transfer, effective 26 April, 
marks the end of radios oldest 
ll ( )2<">i and largest regional net- 
work. \ new problem: shows ma\ 
be disputed in eight major mar- 
krt-. sa\s DeCra\. where Don Lee 
stations wont want to relinquish 
to ABC outlets. But, "'out first 

obligation is to our affiliate*. 

„. . . . F.duarJ J. DeGray 

I his means the shows at con- 

v.p. of RKO-Teleradio Pictures, Inc. VBC bought: six 15-minute 

tracts' end undoubted!) will go to VBC stations, with the network 

thus strengthening it- sales and coverage position. 

VBC bought the package to serve station* a* well as clients. *a\* 
DeGray. "We want to cover a* much of the I . S. as possible, and 
we want to have >|>lil lineups which clients seek in the West, He 
and hi* staff will develop special sectional sale* packages within the 
next in to (id (fins. The mechanics <>f programing and operations 
will l>e absorbed l>\ \I!C"* Pacific Coasl Radio network. 

VBC salesmen will also sell fntermountain Network time periods 
as 41 station* in I lie chain affiliated with VBC earlier this month. 
Speed) expansion in coverage and affiliation is expected to be fi\ poed 
even more when \l'>< reportedl) will align with the Vrizona Network. 

With these moves, DeGra) is bringing into full circle the experi- 
ence lie'* acquired in broadcasting. He started in the accounting 
department al CBS in L940, ha* since moved to station management, 
spot, co-op and special program sales. He joined VBC Radio station 
relations in 1955 and was elected a vice president in 1 ( )">7. ^ 







*l'ci\*ni; 



4 APRIL 1959 










ANOTHER SURE THING 



FROM ITC 

NOW COMING YOUR WAY. 








1 



i 



■r 



14 



^1 






The famous 



I 



Already signed up for a FIFTH year 



on NBC-TV by General Foods Corporation and 
The Borden Company, through Benton & Bowles, Inc., 
now available as Brave Stallion for your 
profitable sponsorship. 

The adventure series about a black stallion that . . . 

lassoes a whopping 64.1% average share of 
audience (Nielsen, July-Dec, 1958) at a 
$1.70 Cost Per Thousand (Jan.-Deo, 1958) 

ropes off an impressive 17.8 rating (Nielsen 
4-Season Average, Oct., '55 through Jan., '59) 
on NBC-TV, Saturdays, 11-11:30 A. M. 

BRAVE STALLION will corral a loyal all-family 
audience in your market . . . available right now! 
For a sure thing, wire or phone PLaza 5-2100 
collect. 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 




m JtAfllSAH '"""' 



NFW VORK ■>■> 



p I 1 7 1 "-■""" 



NEW SIXTH STREET EXPRESSWAY 

symbolizes Kansas City's dramatic 
half-billion-dollar downtown redevel- 
opment program which has attracted 
national attention. 

KCMO-TV: Basic CBS TV. Channel 5. 

Photo: Sol Studna 





Everything's up to date in Kansas City 



From the downtown renaissance to the suburban 
building boom, Kansas City races into the future. 
And — KCMO-TV keeps the city in touch with the 
pulse of the present and spirit of tomorrow. Out- 
standing CBS programming, award-winning news, 
community service. 



This is why more people here watch KCMO-TV 
(say ARB and Nielsen) than any other station. 
Why sales are up to date in K. C. when you ad- 
vertise on KCMO-TV. We broadcast at maximum 
power from the world's tallest self-supported 
tower — Kansas City's electronic landmark. 







/ 



KANSAS CITY 


KCMO 


KCMO-TV The Katz Agency 


SYRACUSE 


WHEN 


WHEN-TV The Katz Agency 


PHOENIX 


KPHO 


KPHO-TV The Katz Agency 


OMAHA 


WOW 


WOW-TV John Blair & Co. — Blair-TV 


TULSA 


KRMG 


John Blair & Co. 



Kansas City, Missouri 

Joe Hartenbower, General M«r 
Sid Tremble. Station Mgr. 



Represented nationally by Katz agen 

Meredith Stations Are Affiliated wl 
BETTER HOMES and GARDENS and SU 
CESSFUL FARMING Magazines. 



)ln\i significant t> <mil radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in i/fjiili for busy readers 




SPONSOR-SCOPE 



4 APRIL 1959 

0««yrl|ht 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



If there's a wide round of spot rate increases by tv stations this fall, the event 
won't floor agency media directors: They're more or less prepared for it. 

Buyers can expect agitation for hikes particularly from ABC TV affiliates in a 

number of the major markets. 

A rep, who has a batch of ABC TV stations on his list, told SPONSOR-SCOPE this week: 
"The lineup ABC has set for the fall is expected hy the affiliates to tilt the share 
of audience more in their favor: they feel this should he reflected in higher rates." 

Says another rep: "Increased rates are logical and inevitable. Stations in the top 
markets are approaching a sold-out situation in the fall, while the present ratecards 
— due in large measure to last vear's recession — are loaded with packages that make the 
cost of a spot almost equal to radio." 

(For a sumup of the network rate situation, see 28 March SPONSOR-SCOPE. > 



Here's a tip-off on the increasing tightness of the tv spot situation: An agency 
that only recently put itself on the record as militantly opposed to triple-spotting was 
in the process of making buys this week in triple-spotted situations. 

The agency's media director, when asked how he reconciled such schizophrenia, said: 
"Our only other choice would be to turn the money back to the client." 



Nestle is pulling out of nighttime network tv completely and confining its air 
media activities to tv network daytime plus spot tv and radio. 
The company's ad budget runs around S20 million. 



The difference between winter and summer viewing is almost negligible, a 

study on the subject just released by Nielsen shows. 

In terms of cumulative weekly audience tlie margin is but 4%. 
(For details of this study, see page 36.) 



Necco, which uses no other medium but spot tv. will double its budget and 
expand its distribution through to the West Coast this week (via La Roche I . 

The new market lineup will include Detroit. Chicago, L.A.. and San Francisco. 
Buying weight: 200 rating points a week. 

Just a couple of years ago Necco confined its distribution to the Northeast section of 
the nation. 



The big turning point for ABC TV unquestionably has occurred: It \s\\\ have 
the bulk of P&G*s network business this fall, wtih NBC TV and CBS TV the losers. 

P&G will have at least eight shows going on the network- next season, and there's a 
good chance of a ninth. ABC will have at least five of them. 

Already set on ABC are all of the Real McCoys and Robert Taylor's Captain of 
Detectives 1 10 p.m. Friday), and half each of Wyatl Earn and the Rifleman. \ prospec- 
tive added -tarter: Half of the Alaskans. 



PONSOR 



4 APRIL 1959 



13 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

They really come back to the same agency : it's happened in the case of Chase 
& Sanborn and J. Walter Thompson. 

The return of the account to JWT takes effect 1 July. The billings amount to $8 million. 
The losing agency is Compton. 

The upgrading to which Lever is giving its tv network lineup next fall has a 
bigger objective than just cost-per-thousand: It wants to wind up with four or five shows 
in the top 10. 

Another clue to that Jack Benny-George Gobel alternating buy: The strong urge 
among Lever's advertising top level is for integrated commercials — using the star to do 
at least the lead-in. 

Take a look at the new wonders coming in the food field: 

• What could turn out to be as gigantic a break-through for foods as the nicotine filter 
was for cigarettes is a variety of eating fats and oils that contain a minimum of 
cholesterol. 

Marketing men expect this revolutionary development to hit the market — to the tune of 
large advertising budgets — within the next two or three years. 

• Another break-through anticipated in the food field is a germ stabilizer that will keep 
milk perpetually fresh. 

• Incidentally, look for the refrigerator field to introduce a contraption with 
both heating and cooling units to keep food warm as well as cold. 

As the new tv buying season unrolls, you hear talk among agencies about escaping 
youth-control of the dial by not buying network before 8:30 p.m. on weekdays. 

As an important sidelight on this attitude it's interesting to note that (1) the young 
still account for 36% of the audience at 8:30-9 p.m. and 30% at 9-9:30 p.m.; (2) while 
the adult audience increases as the evening wears on, the increase is neither spectacular 
nor big enough to compensate for the loss of the younger set. 

Here's an average audience composition based on the November-December 1958 NTI by 
half-hours in the evening Monday through Friday: 

NATIONAL SETS VIEWERS MILLION PCT. PCT. TEENS CHILDREN 

PERIOD IN USE PER HOME VIEWERS MEN WOMEN (11-18) (4-10) 

7:30-8 55.0 2.6 62,205 27% 33% 12', 28% 

(16.795)* (20,528) (7,465) (17,417) 

8-8:30 :>«).(, 2.6 67,408 28 34 12 26 

(18.874) (22,919) (8.089) (17,526) 

8:30-9 63.0 2.5 68,513 29 35 12 24 

il<).869) (23.979) (8,222) (16,443) 

9-9:30 (.3.9 2.4 67.478 32 38 12 18 

(21,593) (26.642) (8,097) (12,146) 

0:30-10 63.0 2.4 65,772 33 40 12 15 

(21.705) (26,309) (7.892) (9,860) 

10-10:30 59.0 2.2 56,463 36 43 10 11 

(20.327) (21.279) (5,646) (6,211) 

10:30-11 52.3 2.2 50.0">2 37 44 ( > 10 

(18,519) (22.0:n) ( 1,505) (5.00.V) 

'Figures in parentheses are numbers of viewers in million-. 

14 SPONSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

This may turn out to be a ke\ week for NBC T\ : ll has a number of substantial 

deals cooking both in Detroit and New York. Some of the developments: 

• JWT is looking at hour periods on NBC in which to spot lord'-* weekly expen- 
sive extravaganzas (previously it had been talking to CBS TV). 

• Arthur Murray (Lorillard) and Johnny Staccato (K. J. Reynolds) will be 
scheduled this fall hack-to-hack Tuesday nights. Note that both sponsors are ciga- 
rettes, indicating that the traditional protection is showing signs of crumbling -till 
more. Of course, it will be a major-minor arrangement For the two advertisers; but never- 
theless the pair will be side by side. 

• 1SBC is offering the new 7:30-8:30 p.m. action shows on the basis of 20-minute 
units, which means that area will probably be loaded with minute participations. 

Esso's Flit, a spot perennial, is turning to network tv this season. 

Via McCann-Erickson it will sponsor, starting 1 June, alternate weeks of the David 
Niven show and Cimmaron City on NBC over 12 weeks. 

It's the first vear the insecticide has had national distribution. 



CBS TV has yet to round out its plans for letting affiliates have two one-minute 
spots in the first 20 minutes of the programs that will be slotted in the 7:30-8:30 span 
Tuesday and Wednesday this fall. (The stations could sell these on their own.) 

The move would be a partial reward for giving up time (the 7:30-8 period) which 
is not part of the network option structure. It will be the first time that CBS TV has done 
any co-oping at night. 

Compensation to CBS for the 20 minutes: a third of the program's cost. 

McCann-Erickson this week was still trying to dispose of half of next season's 
Westinghouse-Desilu series. Buick and Colgate which arc with the same agency, are 
among those being approached. 

Incidentally. Westinghouse has elected not to compete with Steve Mien in his 
new Monday 10-11 p.m. niche: it will house the Desilu show in the Fridaj 9-10 p.m. 
segment starting this fall. 

Norelco already has aligned itself with Allen for the fall for at lea-t 1 12 weeks. 

Note re Colgate: It's looking with favor on sponsoring all of IVrrv Mason. 

In light of the prospect of twice as many specials next season a- during this one. 
you may be wondering what the networks consider to be the saturation point for 
that type of programing fare. 

The answer you'll likely get if von ask the networks is this: 
• When the regularly scheduled advertisers feel that the pre-emptions for spe- 
cials runs counter to the efficient continuity of their air presence. 

Of course, there's no flat rule as to how the individual advertiser will react. There are 
quite a few who welcome the opportunity to take an occasional vacation from their 
niche — especially if the pre-empted period matches a slow portion of the selling season for 
their product. 

In other words, the networks have to play their specials tune by car. 

Schwerin has just discovered that specials are greatly in favor with viewers. 

The findings: Specials did "about 50% better than the average of all half-hour 
weekly non-dramatic shows in gaining increased viewer approval of the sponsor." Even, 
as Schwerin put it. "if thev are turkeys." 

Most-liked specials, in order: (1) Dramatic. (2) musical. (3) documentary. 

SPONSOR • 4 APIUL 1959 15 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The daytime tv tide in January wag strong enough to give billings for the three 
networks a collective 5% edge over last year. Daytime was up 21.4%, whereas gross 
sales for nighttime were down 2%. 

The billings for this January, as compiled by LNA-BAR and released by TvB: 
ABC TV, $10,647,078, up 16.1%; CBS TV, $22,129,248, up 0.2%; NBC TV, $19,- 
299,853, up 5.2%. Total: $52,076,179. 

Sponsor retention of network tv shows gets weaker each season. 
Between March 1957 and March 1959, only 28 shows have held on to the same 
sponsor. 

Incidentally, eight of the 28 shows are either due to go off the air at the end of 

this season or switch to entirely new sponsorship for next season. 

That two-week Chiquita banana schedule which United Fruit started last Mon- 
day on CBS and NBC Radio was actually placed by BBDO on the previous Friday. 

The agency figured that there's a record somewhere since it took but two hours to 
firm up the deal (including spot radio in eight markets). 

Billings entailed in the crash program: $60,000. Estimated listeners a week be- 
tween the two networks: 50 million. 

The battle to keep the Pentagon and others from nudging tv out of its present 
spectrum positions was heightened this week with the filing by the Assn. of Maximum 
Service Telecasters of a 41-page statement with the FCC. 

Highlight of the statement was a five-point platform outlining AMST's attitude on tv 
allocations. 

(For details see WASHINGTON WEEK, page 57; watch for article in 11 April issue.) 

Whatever might be said about P&G as an advertiser, there's this quite significant 
thing about the giant: It operates from a definite set of standards. 

The chief motivation may be circulation, cost-per, or cut-off points for network shows, 
but it's still a set of standards. 

Unlike other massive tv users, who can't make up their minds whether they want circu- 
lation, identification, or integrated commercials, or whatever set of values. P&G leaves little 
room for ili.nl. i or confusion among those attached to its tv spending empire. 

Toiletries manufacturers are watching with much interest the response that 
supermarket operators make to a new-fangled idea being preached to them by some 
merchandising experts from Madison Avenue. 

The doctrine: Integrate the toiletries with related items instead of bunching them 
all together on the drug rack. Thus, for instance, cleansing creams would be grouped 
with hand soaps. 

Tied in with this recommendation is the exortation that supermarkets stop feel- 
ing that their toiletries business is something they'd stolen away from drug stores 
and start treating them with the same merchandising know-how as any other products on 
their shelves. 

\n admitted stumbling block t<> the preachment: In many supermarkets the drug- 
toiletries setup is controlled by rack jobbers. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 8; 
Spol Buys, page 28; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 62; Washington Week, page 57; sponsor 
Hears, page (><>: Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 70; and Film-Scope, page 58. 

16 SPONSOR • 4 APRIL ll>59 



HOUSTON 



its always 

a pleasure 




SPONSOR • 4 APRIL VW) 



17 





*l 











PACKS THE BIG SELLING PUNCH! BEATS ALL COMPETITION 
IN THE HOTLY COMPETITIVE N.Y.C. SEVEN-STATION MARKET 

Look at William Tell after only three weeks on the air in New York : Mar. 4 Arbitron shows the 
program catapulted into number 1 position in its time period with a resounding 8.6 rating, 
25.9 audience share. This beats all other competition in this tough 5:00 to 5:30 time period. 
And William Tell does it all alone! As WPIX's first commerical program of the day, stepping off 
from a 1.8 public service show lead-in, William Tell increases the WPIX audience almost 500%. 

That's how "William Tells" all-family costume drama appeal works for TROPICANA ORANGE 
JUICE in New York. It works all around the country, too . . . punching up sales for such adver- 
tisers as MEADOW GOLD DAIRY, FISHER FOODS, LUCKY 7 STORES, GARDEN FRESH FOOD CHAIN 
in Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Houston, and Clarksburg, W. Va. More important, "The Adventures 
of William Tell" packs the same big punch for you ! For complete details, phone, wire, write 

■I* PROGRAM SALES, A DIVISION Of NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES, WC.1I COLUMNS CIRCLE. NEW TOM 19. N. T JU 2-7500 UJI DDHP D A Ml C A I CO 



wanted 
(o know... 

to we asked PULSE 
k to a»k f he people of 
Nation. 27th Largest 
Market the following] 



THE RESULTS: 

November 1958 

Qualitative 

Survey of the 

22 County 
Tidewater, Va. 

Area 
Question 1 : 

When you first turn on the radio, is 
there any particular station you try 
first? 

Answer: 



J 



10. 


♦% 








»•!% 



Question 2: 

Which radio station, if any, do you 
prefer for music? 

Answer: 






«-'■%'• B 



Question 3: 

Which radio station, if any, do you 
prefer for news? 

Answer: 

■ \ -EL. c » 
• *% ESE9 « i% UM 

Question 4: 

If you heard conflicting accounts of 
the same story on different radio sta- 
tions which station would you 
believe? 

Answer: 






A 



••»% 




H 



RADIO 

Col^Ckou^JL \3\ 

Norfolk - Newport News - Portsmoutli 
and Hampton. Virginia 

...ranks 1st during 
155 out of 180 rated 
half hours... 

Represented Nationally by 
JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 

20 






by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 




Point and counterpoint 

Making National Association of Broadcaster 
conventions these days has a distinctly different 
flavor for me than making the same conclaves 
did years ago. Maybe it's just a matter of 
mellowing with time. Maybe it's the simple fact 
that I am not charged, in covering the meeting-. 
with any specific news duties. Maybe it's a 
combination of both. But whatever the reason-. 
I seem to have considerably more inclination to observe and ponder 
upon the human side, possibly the more dramatic values of the 
convention than in the 20 or so years gone by. 

For example, as Bobby Sarnoff, NBC's chairman of the board, 
got his keynote award, my eye drifted to his dad. the General, seated 
on the platform to his right. General David is a poker player from 
'way back, and it is rare that bis facial expression betrays any deep 
emotion he is feeling. As he watched voung Bobbv accept his award, 
as he listened later to Bobbv make bis plea for t\ to answer it- 
critics there were only occasional indication- thai he was mightily 
pleased with his boy. But he was. I'm sure. 

The General ami his son 

I thought hack to the NBC convention at Miami, the vear they 
opened the Americana Hotel, when the General announced to the 
gathered affiliates and newsmen that Bobbv was going to take over. 
1 remembered waiting at the table before I left For a chance to -a\ 
congratulations to the young executive after he'd made his maiden 
speech as NBC's new president, and watching the General and 
Bobby's mother walk by, she moist-eyed and proud, and the General, 
tight-lipped and poker-faced. 

He had told the multitude in no uncertain terms thai he thought 
Bobbv was ready, thai he would make the network a fine president. 
He told the -to i \ of a friend of his i the ( ieneral's i w ho also was the 
head of a large American corporation, and whose son worked in 
thai corporation. He told of the son's excellent record and hi- 
father's reluctance to put him at the head ol the company. 

"I'm afraid for him." that lather told the General. 

"And I wonder." said the General to thai NBC Convention, 
"whether thai Father wasn't afraid for himself, rather than for his 
son. I wondei il he wasn't holding his son hack, nol because he was 
afraid hi- -<m wasn'l ready, bul because he was afraid he, the lather. 
might be criticized for advancing his son. 

The General wasn'l afraid, as he made verj plain thai evening 
in the Americana. \ml Bobb) hasn'l let him down. Bobby has been 
nol onlv a good NBC executive officer, but he has proved himself 
a good industrj leader. 

\t the recenl convention in Chicago he -poke for all the thinking 






SI'ONSOH 



1 \PRIL ]Tv0 



wm 



KU#t{Ji 



Again, WJBK delivers the 

big baseball -minded 

Detroit market 



Michigan's mosl result-producing independenl ra- 
dio station carries the complete 1959 schedule of 
Detroil Tiger baseball games -nighl and day, at 
home and away. This is the 12th consecutive year 
WJBK has been selected Eor complete coverage oi 
Tiger games. 

10,000 Watts Days 1,000 Watts Nights — 1500 Kl 



DETROIT'S BASEBALL STATION 



WJBK 

THE MODERN SOUND OF RADIO IN 

DETROIT 



Represented by the KATZ AGENCY. INC. 



Storer Broadcasting Company i<4>^ 

WJBK WSPD WJW WIBG WWVA WAGA WGBS •- ^* 

Detroii. Michigan Toledo. Ohio Cleveland, Ohio Philadelphia. Pa. Wheeling. VV. Va. Atlanta, Ga. Miami, Florida ^Afpfc,^ 




My Mommy Listens 
to KFWB 

Glamorous, amorous, work- 
ing gal or lady-of-leisure. . . 
most mommies in the great 
Southern California area 
listen to KFWB. 

And don't forget . . . for 
every mommy there's a 
daddy, and they listen to 
KFWB, too! Time after 
time, Pulse and Hooper 
both confirm that KFWB is 
the daddy of all radio sta- 
tions in the L. A. area. 

... So buy KFWB. First in 
Los Angeles. It's the thing 
to do! 




6419 Hollywood Blvd . Hollywood 28 HO 3 SIM 



tOIIRI M PUUCfll. President and Gen Manager 
MIUON K KICIN. Sales Manager 
Represented nationally by I0MM IUIR 1 CO 



Sponsor backstage continued 



members of the industry who have long since grown wear) of being 
pushed around by critics and hecklers, on papers, on magazines, in 
government and elsewhere. J don't reall) know if Bobb) had pre- 
viously discussed this stance with other industry leaders, like Frank 
Stanton. It's more than likely, and it's immaterial, whether he did 
or not. The point is that just prior to the opening of the convention 
itself, Doc Stanton had told the CBS affiliates in a private meeting 
that CBS was sick of sitting back and taking the blasts, big and little, 
justified and not. without moving to make an answer. 

And Dick Salant. one of CBS's brighter young men told the con- 
vention a couple of days later that CBS was going to undertake a 
$100,000 survey to find out exactly what the American public did 
think of television. The results of the survey, he said, would be 
made available to the NAB. if the association desired. 

And, of course, following Bobby Sarnoff's speech, the Association 
did appoint a committee of nine of the best broadcasters and public 
relations men in the business to cook up plans for a public relations 
campaign to rebut television's critics in every area, on every level, 
and to present video's story solidly. This committee, of course, is 
headed by C. Wrede Petersmeyer. president of the Corinthian Broad- 
casting Corp., and consists, otherwise, of Bob Swezev of W DSl -T\ . 
New Orleans; Ward Quaal. WGN-TV. Chicago; Roger Clipp, WFIL- 
TV. Philadelphia; Don McGannon of Westinghouse: Jack Harris of 
KPRC-TV, Houston and publicists Ken Bilby of NBC TV, and Mike 
Foster of ABC TV, as well as Dick Salant. 

This committee, some time before 30 April will report back to 
the NAB Television Board with an outline for its plans for the in- 
dustry public relations campaign. I'm sure the plan will be a good 
one. and I'm etpiallv sure it will ha\e a -low but certain effect on 
countering at least some of the more ridiculous and blatantl) prej- 
udiced and thoughtless tirades of the business's critics in all areas. 

Tempus Digits right along 

I realized, as this effort shaped up at the meetings, that this was 
an important development for television, and thai it would rebound 
to the benefit of viewers and advertisers alike. But mure than any- 
thing else I was thinking of the human drama unfolding a- I watched 
the General watching Bobby make the keynote pitch. 

\ihl I must confess that I got more of a kick seeing all mv \ .I.P. 
buddies at our annual reunion dinner mi the eve ol the Convention, 
than I did oul of the business meetings, and even the new technical 

achievements unveiled at the confab. 

I hate to admit it. but I also got more of a bang out of the 
mountainous swiss cheese and coffee in the sponsor suite, than out 
nl the w hi-kev in man) another. 

Tempus fugits right along, doesn't it? ^ 



Le 


tters 


to Joe Csid 


a are we 


* omo 




Do you always agrt 


te with 


chut Jar 


(sill a 


says in 


Sponsor 


Back- 


stage? J <><■ 


anil the 


editor! 


of SPONSOR will In- happy to receive 


mill print 


your eontmentt 


. Iihlri 


ss tin 


•in to J 


or (.sill 


i. c/o 


SPONSOR, 


II) East 19th 


Street, 


Veto 


York 1 


7. Sew 


York. 



J J 



SPONSOR 



I U'KII. 



TV) 



IN MEMPHIS... 



It Takes 







AMERICA'S ONLY 50,000 WATT NEGRO RADIO STATION 



to Complete the Picture! 



40% of the Memphis 
Market is NEGRO - 
and you need only 
one medium to sell 
it- 



MAR 

40% 



Now represented by 
THE BOLLING COMPANY, INC 



MEMPHIS" ONLY 50,000 WATT STATION • 1070 KC 

TOP RATED BY ALL AUDIENCE SURVEYS FOR TEN YEARS! 



SPONSOR 



4 APRIL 19.VJ 



WR6* 



wouVm 





hicago 



115 KW AUDIO 

spans a 

BILLION DOLLAR 
Rockford primary 
market 



COVERS ALL OF 14 COUNTIES AND MARKET PORTIONS OF 14 OTHERS 

The new, wide-range of WREX-TV, now increased to 229,000 watts 
video effective power (five times the former ratings), extends the 
primary limits of the Rockford TV market to encompass $l.l-billion 
potential . . . widens the "secondary" range of influence to include 
a total $2.5-billion. 

WREX TV COVERAGE 

WREX-TV spans audience 
interest . . . comparative rank- 
ings of top programs, ARB area 
survey, shows 33 of top 37 pro- 
grams are all on WREX-TV. 
WREX-TV leadership is strong 
throughout the telecasting day: 

Rockford Metropolitan Area — 

station share of sets-in-use summary — 

for 4 weeks 

Source ARB Oct. 21 - Nov. 19 — 1958 

WREX-TV Station B 



7<>fe4< 



sales power! 

WREX-TV - "The Viewers' Choice 
DELIVERS your message to the 
buyers in this rich industrial and 
agricultural market. 
The consistent hi^i quality in pro- 
duction, promotion and merchandis- 
ing of both spots and programs has 
earned many major awards for 

WREX-TV this year' 



TOTAL MARKET: 
Population 
Households 
Spendable Income 
Retail Sales 



1,343,651 

413,099 

$2,502,773,000 

$1,768,295,000 



Mori. — Fri. 

Sign-on to Noon 56.3* 
Noon to 6:00 PM 70.3 
6:00 PM to Mid. 55.1 
All Week — Sign-On 
to Sign-Off 59.2 



48.4 
28.7 
43.8 



a wider market/coverage range in the Rockford BILLION DOLLAR market 



"W IR.E3 IX1- T "V" 




♦Shares — station on less than the station tele- 
casting the most quarter hours during par- 
ticular period. 



CHANNEL^ _?^ ROCKFO 
J. M. BAISCH, Gen. Mar. 

Represented By 
H-R TELEVISION, INC. 




49th an 
Madisor 



21 



No subsidy here! 

In your 14 March issue of SPONSOR 
Magazine I was most interested in 
the Sponsor-Scope item concerning 
Radio Tv Farm Directors. We have 
heard from many sources that farm 
departments are being cut down or 
eliminated because of the feeling that 
do not have a place in "formula" 
radio: however, we believe verv few 
stations would he willing to eliminate 
or cut down their farm departments 
if they were a paying proposition. 
We agree that the personalis of the 
farm director has a great deal to do 
with advertiser acceptance, provided 
of course, the coverage of the station 
is adequate. 

We have seen too many farm de- 
partments operate strictly on "hand- 
out" material . . . This has a place in 
the evervdav operation of a farm de- 
partment hut we do not believe it will 
substitue for real journalistic abilitv. 

W r feel -ii -I i onglv about our ow D 
farm department that we have re- 
cently added our fifth member. The 
department i- now composed of ourl 
outstanding Farm Director. Cotton] 
John Smith, three farm editors and 
a photographer. The most recent ad- 
dition is a pasl president of the Texas 
f f \ and pasl v iee president ot the 
southern region ol the National I' FA 
— a most outstanding voting man. We 
feel thai we could as easilv do with- 
out our transmitter as our farm de- 
partment. 

Hill Fane 

Ifgr., KGNC Radio 

tmarillo 

Right man, wrong award 

We appreciate your mention of our 

general manager, .1. (.. Kellam in vour 

"W lap 1 p" set lion of vour February 
L'7 issue of sponsor and 1 am sure 
that Mr. Kellam is highlv flattered 
bj your storv that he was selected 
""^ oung Man of the 1 ear. " 

W e think i. in ho>^ is a pretty 
young man and well deserving of 
I Please tui n in page 26 I 



»ro\soii 



M'llll. 



I").V) 




IF IT IS BIG 

and IMPORTANT, 

its on W HAS -TV 




WHAS TELETHONS 

HAVE RAISED 

$1,000,110 

FOR HANDICAPPED 

CHILDREN 



$1,000,110 lias been contributed to six 
WHAS Telethons. Professional produc- 
tion, ability to demonstrate the need, 
good talent, much of it from WHAS- 
TY's own staff, and viewers' confidence 
that their money would be spent wisely 
prompted the overwhelming response. 
Their money has built classrooms and 
playgrounds, trained instructors, per- 



formed operations, purchased artificial 
limbs and a muscular dystrophy bus . . . 
tested the hearing of 95,000 children, 
established Kentucky's first cancer clinit 
for children and first deft palate and 
harelip clinic, and much, much more. 
When BIG, IMPORTANT things are 
accomplished in Louisville television, 
they're accomplished on WHAS-TV. 



Your Advertising Deserves WHAS-TV Attention . . . 
with the ADDED IMPACT OF PROGRAMMING OF CHARACTER! 



WHAS-TV 

Foremost In Service 
Best In Entertainment 



WHAS-TV CHANNEL 11 , LOUISVILLE 

316,000 WATTS — CBS-TV NETWORK 

Victor A. Sholis, Director 

Represented Nationally by 

HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS, INC. 



SPONSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 



25 



KOBY 



is t!h.e n.o. 1 record. 



IN SAN FRANCISCO 



["here's .1 great new audience record that's the 

Number I hii in San Francisco — and it's KOBY! 

January-February Pulse fii\<-> M)ltY the 

highest average share (> a.m. to midnight 

—15.0. I his makes KOBY a 

smart Inn foi you I his 1 >ig 

audience is signed, sealed and 

delivered foi you, youi clients 

or products. And there's no 

double spoiling, so your message 

makes lull impai tl 



See PETRY and get in on tin* prize 
record buy. And, you get 10% 
discount when buying KOBY and 
KOSI. Denver. 

I Hi 1 Jul) . .i In n in I >i n, • 1 . sta) 
hi the Imperial Motel 172& SAi - 
man riuwntown. 



KOBY 

For Greenville, Miss.-WGVM 



10,000 watts 
in San Francisco 



Mid-America Broadcasting Company 





designs jingles and background music for you 



herm edel exec vp • 45 w 45 new york • circle 5-3737 

mort stem hollywood • Hollywood 4-7800 

Jack russell Chicago • state 2-2818 

od schaughency Pittsburgh ■ express 1-0660 



* mitrh leigrb. oraatlva dlreotor at work in hollywood 



49th & MADISON 

I Cont'd from page 24) 

that title — but — the truth is. las we 
set forth in our news release to you), 
that Mr. Kellam was chairman of the 
committee to select the "Young Man 
of the Year." Mr. Ke.lam. himself, 
was named — "The Boss of the Year"' 
— by the Austin Jaycees. 

Paul Bolton 
News Ed., KTBC 

Austin. Texas 

Not a first 

In your issue of 7 February. 1959, 
there appears an advertisement by 
KPRC in which Dr. Ernest Dichter 
is quoted as saying, in part. "This 
study done by KPRC is the first in 
which motivational techniques have 
been applied intensively and in depth 
to audience attitudes toward Radio 
in one large market.'' 

I think Dr. Dichter ought to be in- 
formed that this is not the first study 
of its kind. The Westinghouse Broad- 
casting Co. has conducted several 
such studies, as early as November 
1956. usinj: various motivational re- 
search techniques including semantic 
differential in even a larger market. 
As a matter of fact, sponsor in it> is- 
sue of 23 November, 1957. printed 
an excellent article covering the Pitts- 
burgh study for KDK I. Since then, 
similar studies have been conducted 
for other Westinghouse stations. 

Dr. Dichter is further quoted as fol- 
lows: "It goes almost without saving 
that respondents were never given an 
indication who sponsored the sur- 
vey" made for KPRC. This i> stand- 
ard research practice and is equally 
true in the case of the studies made 
in the Westinghouse markets, where 
in each instance the stuiK was con- 
ducted In an outside research organ- 
ization and there was no reference 
or indication a< to the sponsor of the 
Mil ve\ . 

MeK in \. Goldberg 
Director of Research 
II estinghouse Bdcstg Co., Inc. 
Sew ) <»//. 

Sales aid 

Please forward five copies ol the 21 
Februarj issue ol sponsor Maga- 
zine. Vs usual WHBQ Radio is finJ 
ins sponsor an invaluable aid in clofl 
ing sales. 

Jim Bedwell 
Sales mgr., 1/ HB§ 

Memphis 



26 



1 vi-Kit. 1959 




St. John The Baptist t>y Room 



^rrrf 




Outstanding eiample of 
simplicity and refinement. 
is the Mies van der Rone 
masterpiece, the recently 
completed Cullman Hall 
of The Museum of Fine Arts. 



THE CHRONICLE STATION 
P.O. BOX 1?. HOUSTON I, TEXAS-ABC BASIC GE'IERAL viNAGE". 
HOUSTON CONSOLIDATED TELEVISION CO. WillARD E. WALBRID6E 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 6E0. P. HOLUNGBERY CO.. COMMERCIAL MANA6ER. 
500 FIFTH AVENUE. NEW YORK 36. NY. BILL BENNETT 



sponsor • i u'rii. lav; 



27 



FEBRUARY -MARCH 



OOPER 

SHARE OF 
AUDIENCE: 




Proves KONO is your 

BEST BUY 

for Radio Coverage in 

SAN ANTONIO 



— and KONO leads the field 
in PULSE, too. First in all 360 
quarter-hour periods, Monday 
thru Friday. (Jan. 1959) 



See Your H-R Representative 

or Clarke Brown man 

or write direct to 




JACK ROTH, Manager 

P. 0. Box 2338 
San Antonio 6, T&xas 



28 






National and regional buys 
in nork now or recently completed 



*a& . J 



^fr 



T BUYS 



TV BUYS 

American Oil Co., New ^ ork, is lining up 30-minute segments in 
about 40 markets for sponsorship of the new adventure film series 
Border Patrol, to advertise its Amoco gasolines and oils. Distribu- 
tion is mostly in the Atlantic seaboard states. The schedules start 
mid-April for 26 to 52 weeks, depending upon the market. The buy- 
er is Bob Rowell; the agency is The Joseph Katz Co., New York. 

Armour & Co., Chicago, is preparing schedules in major markets 
to push its frankfurter sales; most of the markets are in the South. 
The short-termer starts 20 April. Minute and 20-second announce- 
ments are being purchased; frequencies vary from market to mar- 
ket. The buyer is Don Heller; the agency is N. W. Aver. Phila. 

The Borden Co., Inc., New York, is planning a campaign in top 
markets for its Instant Whip. The six-week campaign starts 13 
April. Minute and 20-second announcements are being placed; 
frequencies depend upon the market. The buyer is Chips Barrabee; 
the agency is Lennen & Newell, Inc., New York. 

Clamorene, Inc., Clifton, N. J., is entering major markets to pro- 
mote it- Glamorene carpet cleaner. The schedules start this month, 
run for four weeks. Minutes and 20 : s are being used; average fre- 
ouencv: 20-25 announcements per week in each market. The buyer 
is Danny Wilson; the agency, Jules Power Production. Inc.. N. Y. 

RADIO BUYS 

Carter Products, Inc., New York, is going into various markets 

for its \rrid ('ream Deodorant. The 1 3-week campaign -tarts this 
month. Minutes during davtime slots are being used: frequencies 
depend upon the market. The buyer is l.d I'onte: the agenc) is 
Sullivan, Stauffer, Cowell & Bayles, Inc.. New York. 

Dunbar Laboratories, Div. of Chemwaj Corp., Mountain View, 
\. J., is kicking off a campaign for its Senior medicated acne sticks. 
The schedules begin this month for si\ weeks. Minutes during traffic 
times and weekends are being placed; frequencies varj from market 
in market. The buyei is Jefi Fine; the agenc) is Doherty, Clifford, 
Steers & Shenfield, Inc., New York. 

Family Products Division, Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co., 
Inc., Morris Plain-. Y J., is initialing schedules in southern and 
southwestern markets for its Bromo-Seltzer; this i- the first time in 
several years thai spol radio has been used foi this producl on a 
multi-markel basis. The schedules are intended as a tesl as well as 
to give support to its other advertising, and will run from 32 to 39 
week-, depending upon the market. Minute- during davtime periods 
are being -lolled, with frequencies varying. I he buyer is Joe 
Hudack; the aeencv is Warwick & Legler, fnc, New York. 



SI'ONSOI! 



I \eiiii 1959 




Captive or Captivated Audience? 

There's all the difference in the world between a "captive 

audience" and a "captivated audience." 

This goes for the commercials as well as the show. 

Young & Rubicam, Inc. 

Advertising • New York • Chicago • Detroit • San Francisco • Los Angeles • Hollywood • Montreal • Toronto • London • Mexico City • Frankfurt • San Juan • Caracas 



SPONSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 






your 
first 



and biggest 




J^ 






TO TELEVISION COVERAGE 
IN THE ENTIRE SOUTHEAST 
IS CHARLOTTE-WBTV 

Make your own comparison ! ^^^y 

NCS #3 gives CHARLOTTE-WBTV 632,070 TV homes 
Atlanta has 579,090. Louisville 509,480. Birmingham 
587,800. Memphis 453.240. CHARLOTTE STATION "B' 
442,690. Miami 434.800. New Orleans 380,020. Nashville 
366,560. Norfolk-Portsmouth 337.580. Richmond 31 1,680. 

Take the biggest step first — enjoy Charlotte's invigorating 
sales climate. Contact WBTV or CBS Television 
Spot Sales for the complete market story. 





JEFFERSON STANDARD 
BROADCASTING COMPAN 



^ SPONSOR 

4 APRIL 1959 



What's 
the answer 
to 




spot's 

PAPERWORK 

jungle 




PART ONE OF A TWO-PART SERIES 

^ Agencies say spot is five times as 
hard to buy and service as newspapers 

^ Here are trouble spots, pointed out 
by admen, and what ean be done to help 



lo greater testimonial to the value ol spot exists than 
the inconvenience which agencies endure in buying it. 
Ever) step of the \\a\ from planning the campaign to 
paying station- and billing clients is through a tangle of 
paperwork at least fi\e times more time-consuming than 
a newspaper buy, up to 30 times more than a network 
or magazine buj . 

It is entirel) conceivable, one adman told sponsor, 
that an agenc\ with se\eral accounts hilling exclusively, 
01 even in large measure, in spot radio and spot |\ could 




Admen agree spot is a paper tangle. 'Some 

is unavoidable,'' says John Ennis, Bryan Houston media 

v.p. But a lot of the detail is inexcusable. 



go broke on it- IV, commission due to the paperwork. 

II this sounds like an exaggeration, consider jusl 1 1 >«• 
two end- ol a flight involving comparable buys in spol 
and newspapers. 

In initially setting up the lineup, the print buyei ma) 
find thai in a single market there arc two newspapers to 
consider. Since newspapers do not have ratings, he lia- 
onl) to consult VBC circulation figures a job thai might 
consume five minute--. In the same market, however, the 
timebuver ma\ have from four lo in radio stations to 



M'ONSOR 



4 aprii. L959 



31 



consider. Their ratings and other 
data such as composition must be 
checked out. frequentb in several 
rating services. Time spent: close to 
an hour. 

\l the other end of the buy, the 
agency accounting department faces 
another disparate situation. The 
newspaper bill comes in complete 
with tear sheet of the printed ad. 
\nd there has only been one ad in- 
serted per day. The bill from the 
radio station, however, may include 
LO spots for the day, in different 
priced time periods; attached to it is 
an affidavit of performance which 
must be checked spot by spot against 
contracts and rate cards. 

When it comes to accounting, the 
financial head of a major agency 
estimates between $5 and $6 million 
dollars per biller in newspapers 
against less than $1 million per biller 
in spot — five to six times more man- 
hours. 

"It's hard to believe," mused one 
adman, "but it would be quicker and 
easier to buy SI million worth of GM 
stock than $500 worth of air time." 

Station representative Richard 
O'Connell, addressing a recent New 
York RTES meeting on the subject 
of streamlining rate cards, cited the 
following comparison by an agency 
media director on estimating a spot 
versus a network campaign: For his 
staff to estimate a network buy would 
consume about an hour's time; for 
the staff to estimate a spot buy in- 
volving 75 markets would take 
'about four days." 

Ml hough they are well aware of 
the complexities and frustrations of 
buying spot, agencymen are unbeliev- 
abl) tolerant about it. They are re- 
I in t ant to look too closely at its tan- 
gle of mechanics or compare the cost 
of buying and servicing it with han- 
dling nM« of "easier" media. They 
view spol much as a good teacher re- 
gards a bright bill troublesome pupil. 

I hi- attitude was summed up when 
fa\ne M. Shannon, associate media 

director at J\\ I . told the same RTES 
meeting, "Spol i\ and spol radio gel 
'equal time' with othei media forms 
in inn considerations "I media besl 
suited to a client's specific mat keting 
ami i reative objecti; es, in spite "I 
the increasing i omplexil ies "I buy- 
ing spol broadcasting. ... If a me- 
dium i h. it is hardei to bu\ w ill be, in 



Il!lllllll!!ll!!llll!ll 



ifflllllllllllHM 



TROUBLE SPOTS IN AIR MEDIA 

ESTIMATING: A spot campaign is the most cumbersome to 
estimate. In a single market, there may be only two newspapers 
to consider by circulation, eight radio stations by ratings 



AVAILABILITIES: A newspaper page can be divided up or 
pages added. In broadcast, the time slot that was there yesterday 
may be gone today. So time is spent checking and rechecking 



CONFIRMATIONS: Weeks and months may go by between 
the issuance of an order and the sending out of contracts by the 
rep or station. This practice confuses, wastes ad agency hours 



BOOKKEEPING: There are roughly 3,000 radio stations and 
500 tv outlets all billing on different size invoices by as many 
methods. Agencies get to feel like they are station accountants 



BILLINGS: Before an agency can pay a station bill, it must 
check for client. A biller on newspapers can turn out $6 mil- 
lion in same time it takes biller to do $1 million in air 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW 



our opinion, the most effective for an 
advertiser, it will not be penalized in 
our final recommendation." Her next 
words, however, suggested that pa- 
tience was being strained: "But I am 
at a loss to understand why station 
management, so progressive in other 
wa\s, seems to compound complexi- 
ties in the manner in which it sells 
its principle commodity . 

\\ hile this ma\ be the expressed 
attitude of the majoi it\ . there is the 

occasional reactionary. Sometime 
ago. one adman remarked to SPONSOR 
that off the record — spot was losing 
mil on main "tail-end bins." Which 
is to sa) thai w lien it comes to im est- 
ing the last several thousand of a 
budge) land all things being just 
about equal I . the temptation is to 
select the le>^ complicated medium. 



Some of the complexibilities of 
spot will always remain: they are 
built-in components of broadcast me- 
dia. It is useless to sa\ that fewer 
stations in a market would make se- 
lection easier, just as it is futile to 
ask fni a tear sheet on an aired an- 
nouncement. No agenevman wheth- 
er in media or accounting will ever 
expect spot radio or spot t\ to be- 
come as eas\ to bin or bill as net- 
work and national magazines; take 
awa\ the stripes and you ve lost the 
tiger. But there are main areas of 
spol that are inexcusabl) compli- 
cated; mend them and the medium 
will be in a much better position to 
compete against newspapers' for the 
advertisei - dollar. 

"Marketing," says William Hatch. 
vice president and comptroller of Fed 






SPONSOR 



I M'liii. 10.7) 



. 



AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT THEM 



SOLUTION: There is no use envisioning the redaction of 
tr or radio stations in a market to the number of newspapers. 
But a denominator between circulation and ratings would help 



PROGRESS HERE: /// this area, some progress has been 

made. I number of station reps hare tamed up ways to speed 
process of avails ranging from automation to dail\ TWX's 



MORE PROGRESS: / standard contract-confirmation ham 
has been worked out between SR I and 4.4's. Only as several 
agencymen said. "H In isn't it being used 100' < by all reps?" 



THE ANSWER: // h\ not a central hilling system such as 
has been working fine for 30 years for Music Publishers Protec- 

'ire Association. />!//. ISC IP? Standard hilling is answer 



SIMPLIFY: Frequency discounts and rate cards that defy all 
understanding are the nut of this problem. They force agency 
accounting to do station bookkeeping. Simplified cards needed 






..,:.. ;::;,,;j:i:;;;i., ■■;,;;;;;!„ 






Bates Co., "has introduced flexibilitj 
into advertising strategy. Flexibility 
i- what keeps advertising in pace with 
marketing. But broadcasting li a~ 

not been keeping pace with either 
where the sheer mechanics of buying 
and bookkeeping are concerned." 

This nun well be the core of spot's 
problem. It is both nece--ar\ and 
possible today for an advertiser to 
launch saturation flights in \ ital mar- 
ket-, cancel midwa) through, switch 
to new markets, cancel again, then 
launch another flight for a companion 
product. Ml of this can happen in 
the short space of three weeks. 

But for those at the agenc\ who 
are left to sweep up the pieces, to 
cope with the hopeless tangle of 
earned rates, frequencv discount-. 
certificates of affidavit, discrepancy 



lists, national and local rates, package 
plans, invoice errors, open-end rate-. 
weeklj billings on per-month time 
onler-. client queries, rating analy- 
ses, estimate sheets that bear no re- 
lation to station statements, the task 
maj take months and compare with 
the Herculean assignment of clean- 
ing the Augean stable-. 

"I I spot hopes to sell itself on Bexi- 
bility," says another adman, '"it bad 
better become consistently flexible in 
all its phases." 

sponsor talked to main executives 
in both media and accounting, to 
trade association beads, to -tation 
representatives. Although their an- 
gles of approach were sometimes at 
variance, their interest in the indus- 
tr\ was consistent; and their pin- 
pointing of bottlenecks and suggested 



remedies were remai kabl) In ai i ord. 

I he mosl < baol i> areas of buj ing 
spol t\ mi -pot radio appeal to be 
station i ate i .ml- and Btation l",,,k 
keeping. I hei e .in- a lot ol othei 
irritation-, too. Imi mosl of these ai i 
dire. iK ,,i indirectl) tin- pi odu< t of 
the two major troublemakers 

The time spent studying the mar- 
ket-, coverage maps, signals and 
power; the painstaking analysis ol 
ratings, audience composition, show 
t\ pes none ol this i- begi udged at 
the agenc) . I lie-.- are i reative bout s. 
But the hours -pent wrestling with 
complexities of rate structures and 
invoices add nothing to the effective- 
ness of the ad campaign. 

" I here have been definite impi ove- 
ments in both radio and 1\ pi ii ing 
-tincture." -a\- John l.iini-. \ ice 

president and media directo) ai Bryan 
Houston. "Also, toda} there i- more 
adherence to the published rate than 
had been the case. But in the rate 
area there's still \ital need for clearer 
definition of local versus national 
rates. These problem- an- now being 
discussed b\ the indu-tr\. a- in the 
recent meeting of the Media Plan- 
ning Association. 

"" Miothei improvement we'd like to 
see,' l.nni- continued, "is an industry 
clearing bouse outside of individual 
stations or agencies to coordinate 

billing, check up on p I ..I p.-i fbrm- 

ance in short, do the combined 
policing-plus-billing job." 

Such a clearing bouse a- Ennis 
suggests tas have numerous others 
in the indii-ti y) is WO] kin- well fo] 

other industries. The financial world 
i- dependent on just such a system. 
The music industry BMI, AS< AP 
and Mu-ii Publishers Protective 
Association has proved the cleai 
house an extremebj workable opera- 
tion. 

In the case of Mu-ic Publishers 
Protective Association, some l ||(| 
music bouses paj at the rate ol about 

.''J •_•' , ol their business t"t a ' leai • 

mil: bouse service that handle- all 
licensing, receives payments, doe- all 
bookkeeping detail- such a- posting 
pa\ ments against licenses, disbu 
receipts to the member-. The system 
ha- been working smoothly foi 30 
years, saves members and custom 

thousands "I dollars in 1 kkeeping, 

simplifies a i omplete business 

i Please turn to page 5 1 



SPONSOR 



4 april 1959 



33 



What 
an account man 
should know 
about air media 



^ Foote, Cone & Belding v. p. Leo Rosenberg, 39-year 
media veteran, pinpoints account man's responsibility 

^ Patterns differ from large agency to small as the 
number of account specialists and back-stoppers dwindle 



I t's a rare agency executive who 
has the broadcast know-how of Leo 
II. Rosenberg, v.p. and account su- 
pervisor at Foote, Cone & Belding. 
He delivered the first election returns 
on both radio and li : the Harding- 
Cox contest in 1920 from KDK /. 
Pittsburgh, where he was an an- 
nouncer: the U ilkie-lioosei elt elec- 
tion in 1940 from 11 MIC. \eu ) o,L. 
as a guest announcer. Mr. Rosenberg 
started in the agency business with 
Lord & Thomas 33 years ago in 
Chicago and has supervised plans on 

sonic of the biggest broadcast ac- 
counts, including Toni, Horlick, Bea- 
trice Foods, Paper Mate. Clairol. 




lam an account man has been 
broken on the rack attempting to In- 
all lliin^~ to all clients and in trying 
in back u|i general knowledge with 
too man) specifics. 

So says Leo Rosenberg, vice presi- 
ded <il Foote, Cone & Belding, Nev 
^ ink. in answering the question 
sponsor posed this week : \\ hal 
should an accounl man know aboul 
an media? 



Radio pioneer with Westinghouse in 1920, 
Leo Rosenberg has also held announcing, program 
and management jobs at KDKA, KYW, WBZ 



Mr. Rosenberg, a 39-year broad- 
cast veteran who has been an agencv 
executive for 33 years, currently 
serves as account supervisor for sev- 
eral major national accounts. \~ 
long-time agcnc\ manager and su- 
pervisor, he's worked closelv h ith 
client needs and account executive 
functions. He contends ad knowl- 
edge and broadcast know-how, spe- 
cifically, should be general rather 
than detailed for the average or typi- 
cal account executive at a large 
agenc) . 

Smaller agencies require more spe- 
cific knowledge from their account 
people because the\ don't have the 
complex structuring of departments 
with back-stoppers in ever) phase of 
advertising to service the account 
man. Certain areas of broadcast in- 
formation, however, are vital to both 
large and small agencies and for 
account men on large as well as 
small accounts. But other areas onlv 
require specific know-how as the 
agencj staff decreases and the ac- 
count man is. indeed, called upon to 
be all things to his client. 

\tter all. says Mr. Rosenberg, an 
account man is the client's counsel 
and his representative at the agency. 
A highl) departmentalized agenc\ 
with multi-million account billings 

- 

and a variet) of products justifying 

several account people obviouslj has 
a raft of back-of-the-scenes specialists 
who service both account man and 
client: copywriters, researchers, 
media buyers, programers, broadcast 
planners, artists, production people. 
Phus a much more typical agenci 
account billing several hundred thou- 
sands would not warrant an elabo- 
rate stall of specialists behind the 
accounl man. In this case he neces- 
»aril\ is called on to become more of 

a specialist in specific areas. 

The adjacent chart indicates what 
broadcast know-how Mr. Rosenberg 
thinks is \ ital and not so \ ital 
in the- large agenc) contrasted with 
those same functions in -mallei, less 
departmentalized organizations. 

The most ci ucial time w hen an ac- 
counl man supplies information to 
the client i- in face-to-face contact 

during meet in^-. It - then he needs 
spur-of-the-moment answers. If in- 
Formation is requested bj mail or 

I Please turn to page l<> ' 



SPONSOR 



1 \i-iiii L959 



BROADCAST PATTERNS VARY WITH AGENCY SIZE 



[V — vital, / — important, B — bonus knowledge, N — non-essential) 



AUDIENCE 

know general audience patterns 

l'.< familiar with Bpecific station circulation 



LARGE 
iGENCl 

I B N 



\ 



know who controls the i\ set 



Know patterns of segmented audiences 



BUYING 

See media people, presentations 



\ 



Participate in media selections 



Check incoming promotion material 



COMMERCIALS 

Know techniques of production 



Help formulate ropy platform 



Interpret results to client ijoals 



Determine visual treatment 



Participate in product treatment 



COSTS 



Know relative costs of time lengths 


X 




Have general idea of program costs 


X 




Know cost-per- 1.000 patterns 


X 




Know specific rate cards ami variations 




X 


GENERAL INDUSTRY 

Read trade hooks ami daily papers 


X 




Listen to radio 




V 


Watch television 


X 




Follow controversy and broadcast philosophy 




X 


Participate in broadcast meet*, conventions 




X 


Know specific markets* broadcast character 




\ 


Know major stations in major markets 




X 


Know station facilities (power, frequency, etc.) 




X 


wum ERrHANDimNr 

Know general patterns of station merchandising 


X 




Be aware of network merchandising possibilities 


X 




Know what you can «iet from stations locally 


\ 




Understand their advantages, disadvantages 


X 




Know network and station operating patterns 


X 




PROGRAMING 

Know concepts of compatible programing 


X 




I mlerstaml adjacencies, time problems 


X 




Help select talent and themes 




X 


Know program types for audiences 


X 





Keep updated on new shows (tv) 



SM \l.l. 
VGENCl 

I B N 



X 

x_ 

X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 

x~ 

X 

X 

X 

X 

x~ 

\ 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

_x 

X 
X 

\ 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



sponsor • 4 apkii. L959 



fllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM^ IHIIIIIIIIIIHIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



lllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllll 



iiiiiii nii« 



SIZE OF THE POST-MIDNIGHT RADIO AUDIENCE 

Homes using radio after midnight by time zone. January-February 1959 



SUN-SAT. 
i local time) 



EST 

<000> 



CST 

(000) 



PST 

'0001 



TOTAL 

(000) 



12:00-12:30 a.m 825 289 214 1,328 

12:30-1:00 679 255 164 1,098 

1:00-1:30 558 221 151 930 

1:30-2:00 509 170 132 811 

2:00-2:30 437 153 114 704 

2:30-3:00 388 136 107 631 

YARDSTICK: Nielsen average minute data show post-midnight in-home listening is about one third ( i0 r t ) of the 
evening (6 p.m.-midnight) level. Post-midnight audiences also register roughly 16% oj both morning and after- 
noon levels. Actual pre-midnight winter audiences (in millions) are: morning. 5.7: afternoon. 5.5; evening. 3.0 



Why post-midnight radio pays off 



^ Low-budget advertisers, faced by rising direet mail 
eosts, diseover unexpected after-midnight audiences 

^ Though audiences are smaller, 'lonely hearts" 1 copy 
formula in these hours builds surprising sales volume 



J oe Rosenfield, Jr., is a 58-year-old. 
L60 lb. southerner with a firm belief 
thai he can sell anything. This con- 
fidence years ago took him out of the 
iii-N -papei -,ili- and |'i omotion busi- 
ness in New Orleans and put liiui on 
the air in the after-midnight hours. 

Todaj "Big Joe" (see cut) is hold- 
ing forth on a new six-hour stretch 
via WABC, New York, seven nights 
a week from midnight to 6 a.m. in a 
sales-entertainmenl carnival paralleled 
l'\ man] anothei station across the 
i minii \ I hai "Bi» Joe"' had the good 

fortune tO land in llic Big Time ill 

New ^oik basically i- the aftermath 
of some big-time publicity he once 
figured in — he sponsored a " " — 1 1 i j » of 
friendship" to France loaded w itli 

I I and gol bimseli on a lot of front 

pages. 

\\ hai make- "Big Joe" and his 

brethern across the nation all the 
mi . i e notew orthj i ighl now is this: 

• I n lain pi . H I nets — often new 



ones — lend themselves best to an "'in- 
timate" introduction to a more or 
less special class of listeners. 

• The recent hike in postal rates 
can make radio selling cheaper than 
mail selling. 

An announcement in "Big Joe's" 
all-night session sells for 825 las 
against 860 for an announcement in 
prime time). For lliis you will find 
yourself in a mixed compan) of prod- 
ucts main of which "Bijz Joe'" him- 
self owns. Years ago he discovered 
the pull "I late I adio, and reasoning 
thai wliai worked well for others 
oughl to work ju-t as well for him 
became Id* own sponsor along wiili 

his chores as an entertainer. 

The emotions "Big Joe' taps in his 

deep-night audience tend to be two- 
fold: the listenei i- alone or semi- 
|onel\ and thus welcomes a friend: 

moreover, be probabl) isn'l engaged 

in an\ di-li acting ai li\ il\ and hem e 

represents a sort of captive audience. 



Thus the selling techniques consist in 
involving the listener in some kind of 
endeavor along these lines: 

• A club is generally the corner- 
stone of such a program. 

• The telephone is an indispensible 
adjunct. 

• Another essential: a running cast 
of characters, whose personalities de- 
velop nighl alter night, week after 
week, much as characters in a |>la\ or 
SOap opera. 

"Big Joe'' uses all these techniques 
— plus his old instincts for selling 
intangibles as well as tangibles. His 
Happiness Exchange whips up a 
storm ot concern over the financially 
distressed of the Greater New ^ ork 
area. He brings in about $150,000 
for them ever) sear, and is licensed 
a- a pri\ ale welfare agenc\ . 

[Tiese applicants make up the cast 
of character-. (Thej appear on the 
show, il their case is deemed worthy 

enough, i The telephone and the club 
of listeners start to work for them. 
Here's bow "Big Joe" has used these 

elements to sell over 5,000 of his 
own Japanese-made transistor radios 
in four month-: 

• Demonstration. The club did 
the demonstrating for him. 1>\ 
kidding thai "you can'l expect to 
pick me up on the transistor beyond 
a radius of Kill mile- or even as 



36 



Sl'ONSOU 



•I APRIL 1959 



close to me as a subway," he got ihe 
telephone to ring from Florida, 
Minnesota. Texas customers re- 
futing his claim ("I'm listening to 
you now"). Hf also got a call from a 
sulma\ stop. \ conductor was 
picking him up just fine. 

• Promotion, merchandising. 
Guests on the six-hour stint (a show 
business or public figure) get radios 
as uifts a fine chance for them to 
talk about the compact size, the 
beauty, the tone as they look at it 
and test it right there and then. 



• ( op) changes. I be telephone 
provided an excellent, on-the-spol 
waj t<> test cop) approaches, Rosen- 
field says. \t the beginning of the 
campaign in mid-November of last 
\car. the approach changed almost 

daily. 

• Purchasing flexibility. The cost 

ol the radio iS_> ( >.7.~>| is high for a 
direct mail item. How nian\ prospects 
are being lost In the lump sum re- 
quirement of a direct mail response? 
Rosenfield wondered, lie put it to the 
test In suggesting a mail-in down pa\ - 



ment, w Inch tvoi k« just fine, h< -n -. 

\\ ith his i adios going at the i .it' 
of 1,500 a month, Rosenfield bas 
ordered |().(mmi more, apparently 
seeing no sudden end to the response. 

\- for other products thai can be 
-■■Id after midnight, Rosenfield's spon- 
sored li-t proA ides .1 good sampling : 

1 I 1 Cosmetics. I hese include pei 

fume, toilet water, hand and fai e 
lotion, and hath oil (the) make up 
the (ihoo-Choo Cosmetics line, named 

alter his wife, who also IS well-known 

1 Please turn /<< page ">2 ' 



PERPETUAL MOTION is stock in trade of "Big Joe" Rosenfield (WABC midnight-6 a.m.) impresario. His six-hour stint moves 1,500 radios, 
200 cameras, 1,000 lighters a month, plus vitamins, cosmetics, insurance, washing machines, etc. He moves merchandise with hard, personal sell 





New light on video's summer dip 



Special Nielsen tabulations explode some common 
advertising assumptions about viewing in hot weather 

^ Nighttime study shows almost as many homes watch 
tv weekly during the summer as during the winter 



Sunn' sinuii assumptions about sum- 
mer viewing are flue to be knocked 
for a loop by some new Nielsen 
research on the subject. 

The research makes clear that ad- 
men can no longer impress a client 
h\ lightlv tossing off such phrases 
as "Summer viewing i> down a third, 
j on know." 

Though this statement is true in 
a limited sense, the newly-released 
Nielsen data underlines some startling 
qualifications anent the summer dip. 

Item: In a typical summer week, 
almost as many different homes 
watch nighttime tv as during a typi- 
cal winter week. 

Item: Heavy summer viewers watch 
almost as much as hea\\ winter view- 
ers at night. 

Item: The all-important large fami- 
lies, repository ol so much buying 



power, tend to view heavily in the 
summer as well as the winter. 

These facts come out of tabulations 
performed by Nielsen for the first 
time. They answer a number of 
questions about summer tv that time- 
buvers and researchers have been ask- 
ing themselves for some time. Since 
the material has not been widely cir- 
culated among Nielsen clients. SPON- 
SOR presents the summer stud) in its 
entirety below. 

The Nielsen studv is based on a 
comparison of nighttime viewing dur- 
ing the 2-8 March and 3-9 August 
weeks last year. Detailed tabulations 
during the first week of March are 
an annual affair with the research 
firm and are the source of much basic 
data on the dimensions of video (as 
well as radio I . Last fall Nielsen's 
I). C. McGlathen tossed a batch of 



piiiiiiiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

WEEKLY SUMMER AUDIENCE DIP 4% 



AVERAGE MINUTE 
AUDIENCE 



WINTER 



SUMMER 



TV HOMES 
REACHED 
000 



INDEX 



55.5° 




23,588 
100 




368% 




15 824 
66 



WEEKLY CUMULATIVE 
AUDIENCE 



WINTER 

TV HOMES 94.2° 
REACHED 

000 



AVC HRS 
PER WEEK 
INDEX 



40.035 



100 



SUMMER 
90 9° 



39.087 



24.75 
100 



17.02 
69 



Percent oj tt homes reached during « typical summer week is l'< less than 
figure during a typical winter /<(■<■/.. special Vielsen research reveals 



38 



punch cards into the firms huge IBM 
maw to get comparable data show- 
ing how the U.S. audience reacted 
to t\ during the summer. 

The first basic figures worth not- 
ing are that tv's weeklj audience 
during the summer rubs right against 
the winter ceiling. Specifically, while 
tv reached 40 million homes during 
the March week, it also reached 39 
million homes during the \ugust 
week. In terms of the total I .S. tv 
universe, this reads as follows: dur- 
ing the winter 94.2' < of all U.S. tv 
homes watch t\ at one time or another 
during a week s time while during the 
summer the figure is 90.9%. This is 
a decline of only \ c /( . (See chart in 
lower left-hand corner. I 

True, average hours per home were 
down about 30' < . The weekly figure 
during the winter came to nearh 25 
hours, while the summer total was 
a little over 17 hours. The question 
has often been asked whether certain 
homes stop watching entireh during 
the summer while others maintain 
w inter \ iew ing levels or whether \ iew- 
ing goes down across the board. The 
answer apparently is that t\ homes 
generall) tend to watch less. 

But the storj doesn't stop there. 
Averages hide a great deal of infor- 
mation. Obviously, all homes don't 
watch t\ the same amount of time. 
Some watch less, some watch more. 
Does the intensit) of viewing \ary 
in a pattern similar to winter.'' 

To get this answer. Met dathei v 
paired the winter and summer audi- 
ences hv quinliles. \ quintile is 20% 
of the total, nothing more. I'he winter 
audience was broken down into five 
equal pari- and the part- were ranged 
in order of intensit) of viewing. The 
same was done for the summer audi- 
ence. Thus McGlather) could com- 
pare the lightest viewing 20' ! dur- 
ing the winter with the lightest 
viewing 20'. during the summer 
and so on down the line. It should 
be noted that the light-viewing quin- 
lile during the winter doe- not ncees- , 
-arilv contain the same group of 
home- as the light-viewing quintile 
during the summer, etc. (See chart 
on bottom of opposite page. I 

Comparing the two audience- is 



SPONSOR 



1 Venn. 1959 






BIG FAMILIES ARE HEAVY VIEWERS IN SUMMER 




Winter anil summer viewing homes are arranged by quintiles i tlutt is. Ii\ fifths) in order oj intensity "I viewing in chart 
above. Melsen figures indicate that the larger families tend to be the heaviest viewers daring both u inter anil summer 



enlightening. The comparison >li« >w «■«! 
ithat the lightest sumrnei viewers 
spent about 60S less time with tv 
than the lightest winter viewers. Hut 
the heaviest summer viewers spent 
onlv 1T'< less time with tv than the 
eaviest winter viewers. The quintiles 
in between showed corresponding de- 
clines in viewing. 

One result of this pattern is that 
the heavy quintile during the sum- 
mer accounts for a greater share of 
total summer viewing than the heaw 
viewing quintile in winter accounts 
for in the winter viewing total. 
Puttiiii: it another way, hea\ \ sum- 
liner viewers are relatively heavier 
than heaw winter viewers. In terms 
»f viewing time share, here are 
the actual figures: Heaw summer 
riewers account for 3695 of all sum- 
mer view inn: heaw winter viewers, 
on the other hand, account for 30' i 
of all w inter \ iew ing. 

Rut McGlather) was still not 
finished. He took each quintile, 
winter and summer, and broke it 
low ii b) size of family, i See chart 
hove.) \ clear pattern emerged. 
Lar»e families tend to be heaw 
view.r- both winter and summer. 
The pattern is less marked in the 
summer hut it is there, nonetheless. 
Out of curiosity, McGlathen did 



some more manipulation with the 
quintile figures. He wanted to find 
out whether the small families (one 

to two i pie) differed in their 

viewing from large families i five or 
more) within each quintile, winter 
and summer. The answer was that 
the differences were slight. That i-. 
viewing In small families and large 
families in the heav \ viewing quin- 



tiles do ii"t differ from each other, 
w inter or summer, etc. 

McGlather) did one more major 
tabulation. He wanted to compare 
audience composition throughout the 
evening. [*o simplify the comparison, 
he used onl) the first 15 minutes l"l- 
lowing each hour from 6 through 
lit p.m.. New York time. (Since New 
York time comparisons are of \alue 



HOW SUMMER TV AUDIENCES VARY 



TV HOMES REACHED 

LIGHTEST VIEWING 20% 

NEXT 20 % 

NEXT 20% 

NEXT 20% 

HEAVIEST VIEWING 20% 

AVC. HRS. PER WEEK 



■i viewing quintiles ' arranged as in chart at top) reveal heavy summer 
i niiers watch almost as many hours weekly <;< do heavy wini 



WINTER 
94.2% 




SUMMER 
909° o 


SEASONAL 
DECLINE 

4% 


11.58 HRS 




■1.79 HRS. 


59% 


20.63 


1116 


46% 


25 06 


16 61 


34% 


2955 


22 00 


26% 


37.0-1 


3062 


17% 


24.75 




17.02 


31% 



SPONSOR 



4 april 1959 



39 



primarily for network advertisers, 
the audience composition chart below 
covers only the hours of 8 through 
K) p.m. The two earlier hours are 
in station option time.) 

Over-all, the figures showed view- 
ing building up over the evening to 
a peak during the 9-9:15 period, 
both winter and summer. There was 
a noticeable drop in total audience 
at 10 p.m. during the winter while 
the summer 10 p.m. total was at about 
the same level as the summer 9 p.m. 
viewing total. 

In comparing total audiences win- 
ter and summer, the figures showed 
the greatest summer dip in the 7-7:15 
period. The summer level was only 
.)()', ot the winter figure. However, 
the winter-summer gap narrows as the 
evening grows later, an expected pat- 
tern because of the long summer day. 
During 8-8:15 the summer level is 
53% of the winter; at 9-9:15 it is 
64%; at 10-10:15 it is 80%o. 

So far as audience composition 
goes, here's what the winter-summer 



comparison showed. The percent of 
children in the tv audience declined 
as the evening got later, the percent 
of adults increased and the percent 
of teen-age viewers remained about 
the same. The pattern was followed 
in both the winter and summer. Here 
again there was nothing unexpected. 

What general conclusions can be 
reached from all this? First of all. 
any advertiser can assume he Vi ill 
reach almost as many homes during 
the summer as during the winter. 
This is true even for a client who has 
one commercial on a week. While 
such an advertiser will reach, on the 
average, a third fewer homes at night 
with any one commercial, the turn- 
over in audience over a few months 
is likely to result in his hitting a 
homes total greater than the average 
minute dip would indicate. 

For the particularly active summer 
tv advertiser, the probability is that 
his share of the winter audience gets 
close to the 96% level attained b\ t\ 
in one hot weather week. Over the 



summer he ma\ conceivably reach a; 
many different homes as he does dur 
ing the winter. 

The summer client will not maki 
as many total impressions, of course 
In other words, his frequenry-per 
home will be down from the winter 
But if he wants homes coyerage. hi 
can do just as good a job during thi 
summer, especially if he concentrate: 
on late evening times. For the 52 
week network client, the relatively 
high sets-in-use during the latter par 
of the summer evening is something 
to be kept in mind when perusing tin 
schedule for a time slot. 

Finally, there's the matter of thi 
wide variations in the amount o 
home viewing. To those clients in 
dined to write off homes reachec 
with low frequent-), summer t\ shoul< 
have a potent appeal. For the ligh 
viewer is of less importance in tin 
summer picture and the heavj \ iewe 
is of correspondingly greater impor 
tance. And there's still the big fam 
il\ available. ^ 



flllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM 

TV'S AUDIENCE COMPOSITION, WINTER AND SUMMER 



Television audience, men. women, 
children, teen-agers, during period 
March-April vs. July-August, 1958 



TOTAL 



CHILDREN 
(4-11) 



TEENS 
(12-17) 



WOMEN 
(18 & over) 



MEN 



(IK <.\ over) 



No. of viewers 



No. of viewers 
' '( of audience 



No. of viewers 
c / ( of audience 



No. of t iewers 

9r of audience 



No. of ^ [ewers 

' ( of audience 



8-8:15 

Mon. 


p.m. 
-Fri. 


Winter 


Summer 


68,401 


36,550 


18.468 

27 


9,138 
25 


8.208 
12 


5,117 
14 


23,257 
34 


12,792 
35 


18. I< p8 

27 


9,503 
26 



9-9:15 p.m. 
Mon. -Fri. 



Winter 


Summer 


71.188 


47,623 



14.238 

20 



8,543 

10 



27,051 



10,001 
21 



6,191 
13 



18,097 
38 



1,356 | 13,334 
30 30 



10-10:15 p.m. 
Mon. -Fri. 



Winter Summe 



57,970 46,384 



6.377 

II 



6,377 

1 1 



14,926 
43 



35 



6,494 
14 



6,030 
13 



19,017 
41 



14,843 
32 



\ielsen audien position figures point up fact that wjintei and summer patterns are identical. Percent of children 

declini percent o) adults increase, while percent oj teen-agers remain same as evening hour gets later. To compare audi- 

share vs. total I .S. household composition, here's thelattei : children, /"' . . teenagers, \2% ; women, •'<<<'• ; men, 33% 



Id 



mill 



SI'ONSOH 



4 APRIL 19J 



Newspaper 

promotion 
stubs its toe 



^ ANPA's Bureau of Advertising jrcts 
fouled up on radio-print comparison 

^ H-R research director finds flaws, 
turns tables in research counterattack 



Valuable data about Newspapers 

AND NEWSPAPER MARKETS 



Iron, TM£ tUKCAU OF ADV£»ri5INC 4m.r,con N*.ipop*r Publ)ltl«l. 



No. 42 (r*br 
-JLI1I0ST IkTOSSlBU. TO EJUCH CO PH ..." 
TfcO aT»r*«a dA/tlBM Dttl 

radio cetalll . . .ir..i a tyylcai -; •* - - > 

• r tfa« auolonca for th* adj*ctt.t j.r:«r»ai. 

This tcrv-a that a typical > • - 

of ltj fctuotlal audlooco, or 1«?" ' 

tn it*i1.T nrwapapen. it U tlmotl Imp- - ' »J Uul wfll I 

• •bar* of (U potential attdWnc* »• doea lt>* tyi ' -I *i •>' • < ' ■■•" '• ' ' ' 

Tbo rali^a* aotliDal aic f 
■ 

tho nottn« scores cf tuefc aria by oen ud 
1356. "Here ar* tow 

oetaured ids. 





'.-• Hal 
riie 111.] 


ibi/i" • 


<".M9lflC*tl(a 


1 1 




| -■ - 


fOOdl 


M 


i* 




« 


Bousing Bqulpawnt 
* Suppltoo 


60 


3 




B 


Ffcdio & T7 Program 


&0 


J 




9 


Softpe & Cl**nae»r3 


6? 


2 




9 


(SMJECS: I' • 


• , 


Studies, 


J 


JS - 17MI 



The dalle nr».paprr ha, 5«.000.000 circ\ila(!c.n. pulill I - rear 20,6 

i»f ... and ii the UrgMl a.l.erli Idj n ill in . . ' ' ' •• '■' '■■ ■ '■-> 

to hare reach, .ale* impact and <t>tl cfCcirtn.. t>» b. a leader! 

(1) Nlelaer 
(?) I^nycr. 

Talsilslca Ka£a;!ot, .'<iro 1958. 

Reproduced above is release put out last month by American News- 
paper Publishers Association's Bureau of Advertising. B. of A. claims 
typical spot radio plug reaches less than 1% of "potential" audience 



v ]l 



aT% n attack on radio l>\ The Bureau 
oj Advertising, promotion arm <>! 
thi American Newspaper Publishers 
Assn., was found as full of hole- a- 
Swi-> cheese b) the research director 
of H-K. station representative. 

I he B. of \.. in a release early 
last month (see release reproduced 
above) concluded thai a typical ra- 
dio commercial reaches less than 1 ' < 
of iis "potential audience. 

I lie startling fact was de\ eloped 
through the follow ing logic: 

1. The "average daytime network 
radio program reaches 2' of the 
Domes with radio sets." Source given 
i- Nielsen for the two weeks ending 
31 October 1958. 

V *"t\ pical spot commercial on 
radio reaches about one-third" of the 
program audience. Source given is 
Kenyon & Eckhardt research estima- 
ting an average "noting" figure for 
spot radio commercials. 

3. Ergo, "a typical daytime spol 
radio commercial reaches onl) .67' 
of its potential audience." 

In an effort, apparently, to add in- 
sult to injury, the B. of \. added 
that even small-lineage ads (around 
60 lines), have a Starch noting score 
of about ■">' ! . 



Snapped Miss Avery Gibson, re- 
search directoi oi the rep firm: 
■"Misleading, based on questionable 
methodolog) and practically worth- 
less in terms of media evaluation." 

In punching the first hole in the 
I!, ol \. figures. \li-- (iibson pointed 
oul the basic comparison was wa\ 
out in left field. The newspaper 
boys were using full radio ownership 
i ( )7'. of the U.S.) as a base in one 
case ami newspaper circulation a< a 
base in the other, she said. News- 
paper circulation, stated Miss Gibson, 
is "extreme.) low in most markets. 
ho example, in Mo-ton the leading 
newspaper's circulation (per ABC 
figures ' is onlj 19.8' of the fami- 
lies in the retail trading /one (an 
\l'>(' designation) and the median 
paper reaches about 7' - ." In I ,os 
\ngeles. she said, the median figure 
i- about L3' 

Therefore, Miss Gibson implied. 
B. of A. should have multiplied the 
starch noting -core- b\ such figures 
a> these market median-. I SPONSOR - 

mathematicians did so, discovered 
that share of families reached in 
Boston b) small new-paper ads would 
come to .35 and in Los Angeles to 
full) .f..V. I. 



• SPONSOR 



4 april 1959 



Miss Gibson noted thai surveys 
have been made to gather newspapei 
ad noting scores using the same uni- 
\ ei se as radio i atings. A Pulse stud) 
of 70-line ads in Los Angeles -bowed 
the Following ratings For four L.A. 
papers: .1. .2. .2 and .1 . 

This would appear to conti adi< I 
the statement of the 15. of A. in it- 
release that, "In dail) newspapers, 
it i- almost impossible to bu) an ad 
thai will reach as small a -hare of it- 
potential audience as doe- the typi- 
cal spol commercial on daytime 
radio." 

Finally, Miss Gibson noted that 
the B. of \. didn'l tell the whole 
stor) about K&E's research <m noting. 
\\ hat the agenc) did was relate 
noting to circulation Eoi i adio, news- 
papers ami other media a- well. The 
figures for both a 1,500-line black- 
and-white newspaper ad and an earl) 
morning minute on radio i ame to 
one-third in both cases. 

I- those interested, the avi 
noting score for spol t\ was the -ame 
level as spol radio. | 

Furthermore, the k\l study also 
compared cost-per-1,000 impressions 

I Please turn to pagt 



41 




A Sponsor Spoof 



THE 



Mr. Douglas Emmott, Pres. 
Emmott Advertising Inc. 
40 E. 49th St. 
New York 17 
Dear Douglas: 

When you engaged us as your Pub- 
lic Relations Counsel we told you we 
would work with '"might and main ' 
to build up the "Emmott image." 

Well, we have researched the field 
and come up with a real blockbuster 
of an idea. 

Right now all the big men in adver- 
tising are making speeches on 
"What wrong with tv programing'.''"' 

Can you give us a 100-word state- 
ment on this subject? Please make 
it sort of strong and statesmanlike 
as we want to plant it in a real class 
publication like Fortune. 

Sincereh . 
Don 

Mr. Don Nod 

\\ inken, Blinken X \od 

602 E. 55th St. 

New York 22 

Dear Nod: 

Are you nuts? 

If I go sounding off about tv pro- 
grams. Ill be up to in\ hips in red- 
<'\c<l clients who want to cancel the 
programs I've bought for them. 

I'm all for building an "Emmott 
image. Hut maybe you don't realize 
that agenc) men have got to eat. 
Sincerel) . 
D. E. 



Mr. Douglas Emmott 

'.MiMinll Vdvertising Inc. 

10 E. 49th St. 
Vu York 17 
Dear I). E.: 

Vpparentl) you haven't been read- 
ing the papei s recentlj . 

In the past leu mouths men like 
Robcrl Lusk of B&B, Rait Cumminfl 
of Compton, John Cunningham ■ 
< \\\ .mil Bryan Houston of Bryan 



I J 



Sl'ONSOH 



I umui. 195! 



THINKER (P.R. VARIETY) 



Houston have made news with their 
i « 1 * - i » — about i\ programing. 

These men are all heads of large, 
respectable advertising agencies. If 
the) can talk about tv. so can you. 

We want to build you up as the 
leader <>f a ureal movement, sort of 
the Ed Murrow of advertising. Please 
let us have 5 our thoughts. 

Sincerelv . 
D. Nod, v.p. 
Mr. Don Nod 
\\ inken, Blinken & Nod 
602 E. 55th St. 
New York 22 
Dear v.p. Nod : 

M\ thoughts on t\ programs are 
short, simple, and I hope sweet. 

M\ favorite programs are If'afion 
Train. Gunsmoke and Maverick. 

M\ favorite r\ characters are Ma joi 

1\ilams. Flint McCullough, Chestei 
Goode, Doc, and Bret Maverick. 
I think these programs are. con- 
sistently, the most mature, most pro- 
fessional, best produced shows on the 
air. and as well as the most interest- 
ing. 

I think most serious t\ dramatic 
shows are tripe. 

I particular!) despise those written 
by HolK wood-tv pe pseudo-intellec- 
tual- who want to clout me over the 
head with their dark, brooding brand 
of corner drugstore psychiatry. 

Sure I d like to see more good t\ 
programs. But let's have fewer of 
those incestuous dramas about the 
wful neuroses of a $100,000 a year 
w liter. 

Yrs., 
D. E. 

Ir. I). E. Emmott 
Kmmoli Advertising Inc. 

Ii'l' 19th St. 
New York 17 
Dear Mr. Emmotl : 

I hank you for your amusing and 
remarkabb frank idea- about t\ pro- 



grams. I nfortunately, however, the) 
(In not present you in the kind of 
"statesmanlike" light which we feel 
necessar) for the "Emmotl image 

In order to save time wc have 

drawn up a sample statement for your 

signature which, we feel certain, will 

interest the editors of Fortune. 

TV PROCK \MS NKKI) MOR \I 

LEADERSHIP, ->\b EMMOTT 

"We in advertising have a grievous 
responsibility to preserve the cultural 
posture of our current!) affluent 
societv . ' says I). E. Emmott, well- 
known advertising man. 

"As custodians of the t\ fare pre- 
sented in 12 million I .S. homes, we 
must exercise our prerogatives for 
overt, rather than hidden persuasive- 
ness, and choose boldly between the 
Scylla of laissez faire and the Charyb- 
dis of noblesse oblige. 

"\\ hat i- needed in the present tv 
situation is a new tvpe of liberal 
moral leadership to fight the threat 
of interstellar totalitarianism, regard- 
less of creed, race, or previous." 
* * # 

When we receive your written O.K. 
on this, we will release it immediate!) 
to Fortune. 

Sincerel) . 
I). Nod, v.p. 
D. NOD 

WINKI.Y BLINKEN \M) NOD 
(.02 EAST 55TH ST. 
\l.\\ YORK 22 

DO YOU SERIOUSLY EXPECT 
MK TO SKA SI (.11 GARBAGE OR 
IS THIS Jl ST \ BAD JOKE? 
EMMOTT 

Mr. I). E. Emmotl 
Emmott Advertising Inc. 
l() E. 19th St. 
New York 17 

Dear Mr. Emmott: 

It is (juite true that the tv statement 
we prepared for your signature goes 
beyond those made bv Messrs. Cun- 



ningham. Cummings, Lusk, and Hous- 
ton. But we feel thai such boldness 
is a v irlue. and w ill place J ou in a 
position ol "industr) leadership" 
favorable i" the Emmotl Image. 

In drawing up this statement, we 
were assisted bv Dr. \. Archibold 
Nitzwitz, the eminent neurosociolo- 

gisl w hose book. "I he Sturm and 

I h ang ol Automated Industrial < !om- 
munication" i- considered the most 

reliable textbook in the field. 

Dr. Nitzwitz a— uic- us thai this 
type of tnoliv ated-orientatioii will 
build a prestige image for l.mmott. 
Sineerelv . 
I). Nod 

Mr. I). Nod 

Winken. Blinken & Nod 

602 E. 55 St. 

New ^ ork 22 

Dear Nod: 

Please take Dr. Nitzwitz and -lull 
him up a rainspout. 

Please also cancel our working 
arrangement with you effective im- 
mediatel) . 

I'm just a little guv with a little 
agency, trying to get along. I don't 
understand thing- like "image-" and 
'"motivated orientation.' and I'll be 
damned if I'll be a part) to "em. 

It seems to me that tv todav needs 
Fewer talkers and more doers fewer 
guv- -hooting off their mouth- about 
how horrible program- are. and more 
guv- Irving to make better shows. 

It s not an eas) problem and I 
have no idea how to find such guys. 
But that's the gut- of the matter no 
mailer what Dr. Nitzwitz -av-. 

Maybe that's not a statesmanlike 
statement, and I guess it won't inter- 
est the editors of Fortune. But it's 

what I feel, an) how . 

>inc erel) 
I). V.. Emmotl 
I'.S. Don't quote me on this. I realize 
these are unpopular sentiments. ^ 



SPONSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 



43 



ACCOUNT MAN 

■ ( ont d 1 1 otn page 3 1 i 

ovei the phone, either large- oi -mall- 
agenc) account people can rustle 
around and find the information. 
"The major asset foi him I" have is 
.in ability to know what infoi mation 
i- needed ami where to gel it, says 
Mi. Rosenberg. "And another thing: 
he should never blufl. There's nothing 
wrong with saying 'I don t know hut 
I'll find .ml fast.' 

"In a biggei agency, he calls the 
copy person on his product or ac- 
count if the client asks a copy ques- 
tion. The same is true for an\ other 
call lor specific knowledge. \n agen- 
cy Inns specialists to perform those 
specialized, segmented jobs — and it 
should rel) mi their recommendation. 
The account man is the only one with 
the broad, over-all point ol view. So 
his knowledge need not — and should 
not — be specialized." 

What should he know about broad- 
cast media, in light of the specialists 
who hack him up? 

He certainlv should know relation- 
ship-, patterns and trends, says the 



FC&B account supervisor. "He must 
know general operating and profit 
trends in broadcasting, how networks 
and stations operate in relationship 
to each other and independently ; how 
lime costs varv from season to sea- 
son, hour to hour, from announce- 
ments to -how -. 

"'He need not know specific mar- 
kets, unless he's test-marketing prod- 
ucts. But he does, of course, have 
to know where his client's business 
comes from, what his client is trying 
to do and what direction the broad- 
cast schedule should take. 

"But he should have absolutelv 
nothing to do with media selection. 
This is the job of the media depart- 
ment and that's what they're hired 
to do. The same holds true for pro- 
gram selection, the tv, radio unit's 
function: for copy and for art. Bui 
the account man must set the copy 
platform in line with the client ob- 
jectives and he needs to double-check 
final-stage commercials treatment to 
be sure it's entirely in line with his 
sales goals." 

Account people need no first-hand 
association with station and network 



people at convention- and meeting 
however. This is important, he sav 
only if the a.e. i- working on s 
account or with a product which h 
some reason has special local-lev 
needs. 

A local-level situation ..n whi< 
the a.e. definitely should be we 
informed, however, involves me 
chandising. "'He should know wb 
he i- aide to get in the wav of me 
chandising assistance from station 
particularly tv stations; and the di 
ference between the possibilities ar 
potential of network and station pi 
motional support. This i- somethil 
most client- ask about sooner ( 
later.'' -av- Mr. Rosenberg. 

He has this to sav about time ar 
program salesmen. "Yes, our a 
count people see radio/tv sales re 
resentatives- but we always tell the 
what they don't believe: that v 
have nothing to do with making tl 
media or program recommendatio 

There's a strong contrast betwet 
space and time rep-: print salesim 
almost always trv to cover everv rur 
on the ladder — client, account ma 
media people: but broadcast peop 



Selling the Buffalo -Niagara Falls market 




generallv limit their pitches to media 
and program specialists. In the good 
old davs. of course — but even as re- 
centK as 15 vears ago — the account 
He even ordered cost and coverage 
man took on all this responsibility, 
information for certain markets and 
then made his own station selection. 
This i- -till done where a media de- 
partment i- weak or the agenc) is 
very small but the trend is definitely 
oward specific responsibility in spe- 
ifii departments. 

Should an account man encourage 
tations to send liim promotion ma- 
erial? Or should he read it? "Not 
- u il\ ." -a\ - the I- CMJ v .p. "'It 
%\<»n"t hurt him to -<an through pro- 
motion matter if it comes in, but 
thi- i- a highly peripheral ta-k. 
Again, he m u-t know general patterns 
and trend- but should nol be ex- 
tected t<> be exposed to or remember 
sucli detail- a- frequencies, power, 
loverage patterns, program detail and 

lie like.' 

Continuing on the reader-hip 

heme, he explained thai it's very im- 

ortanl for account people i" keep 

up-dated on broadcast developments 



t 



I' 



l>\ reading the trade press and the 
dail) papers. \ big part of the ac- 
count man's job i- interpreting 
trend- to clients in terms of what the 
client needs from tv and radio for 
his marketing objectives and for his 
kind of product or service. 

\\ ith the importance of television 
and net working. Mr. Rosenberg con- 
-iilers it vital that an a.e. know the 
problems of clearing time on affili- 
ated stations and that the) have an 
awareness ol station lineups and net- 
work-affiliate relations. 

I he\ -hould also know the types 
ol audience certain shows will get 
and predominant audience pattern-: 
when men tune in and to what: who 
contt ols the (\ dial during i ertain 
hour-: when an all-famil) audience 
can be reached. Vnother important 
I. n t"i : undei standing the compati- 
l>ilil\ 01 I. H k o| it ot .1 program 

with a i luct, ol a commercial 

breaking into context. 

"Everything an account man knows 
about advertising, ol course, comes 
in hand) soonei oi latei . Vnd evei j 
tidbit ol information i- a bonus to 
his worth to the agent \ and to the 




client. If he has an aptitude and 
a desire to pick up specifics and de- 
tails, that's fine. 

"But he shouldn't be expected to 
know all these things. He's basically 
a marketing man and a salesman — a 
mover of merchandise who is also a 
good administrator. And a good ad- 
ministrator knows how to call on his 
associates and assistants to provide 
him with the facts and figures once he 
has isolated the basic problem and 
assigned possible solutions." 

\\ hether the agency is large or 
small. t\ and radio specialization will 
be a big part of the account man - 
education if he's on an account in- 
volved heavil) in broadcast media. 
On biggei accounts, the set-up max 
provide for several account men. one 
of whom i- a broadcast specialist. 

Professionalism, however, con- 
tinue- as the common denominator 
with large agencies and with small. 
The point o| difference is that big 
agencies tend to hire broadcast pros 
who are specialists. \t the small 
agency, the a.e. ma) well be the pro- 
fessional specialist as well as the 
client counsel. ^ 



RI PE VI ORDERS in the nation's I Ith market, as anywhere else, are the best evidence of television's 
selling ability. WGR-1 V, NBC in Buffalo, is proud that 25 national and 21 local advertisers, who have used 
the station continuously since it started in 1954, have renewed lor 52 weeks of 1959. 

I licse, and newer advertisers, will get even better sales results in 1959, as WGR-TV continues to provide 
better service for more viewers in the mighty and prosperous market known as the Niagara Frontier. 

Two recent developments that emphasize VVGR-TV's continuing leadership in Buffalo are the installation 
ol the first videotape equipment in the aie.i and the pun base ol a new lower— 300 feet taller— 
to l urther extend its coverage in Western New York. 

For best results from America's most powerful selling medium, be sure to call Peters, Griffin, Woodward 
about availabilities in Buffalo. 

NBC • CHANNEL 2 • BUFFALO 




NBC'S NEW AVAIL FORM 



Ni 



IBC Spot Sales has come up with 
a new radio availabilities form to 
make life easier for timebuyers. I See 
"\\ hat's the answer to spot's paper- 
work jungle?", page 31.) 

The new form consolidates on one 
four-page sheet (1) space to list 
availabilities. 12) complete program 
information. (3) data on rates and 
package costs and (4) a coverage 
map. 

George S. Dietrich, director of 
NBC Radio Spot Sales, explained, 
"We have found, for example, that 
when an availability sheet is submit- 
ted to a buyer, he no longer has on 
hand the station program schedule 
which had been sent to him earlier in 
the month. 



"I he salesman is then called upon 
to supply an additional copy. Other 
forms, such as station rate cards and 
coverage maps also have been mis- 
filed or thrown away and are not 
available to the buyer when he needs 
them." 

The new folder is printed with the 
first page blank. When submitting 
availabilities for a prospective ac- 
count, the rep firm types the schedule 
on this page under a sticker identify- 
ing the station and indicating the 
various columns of information. The 
opening page, therefore, can also be 
used for promotional material. 

Previously, information contained 
on the new form appeared on as many 
as four different sheets. f^ 




New form put out by NBC 
Spot Sales consolidates on avail- 
ability sheets all pertinent 
information about its radio stations. 
Four-page form is shown with pages folded 
back displaying program data on inside, 
rate information, coverage map on the back. 
In past, four different sheets were often used 



44 



HOW TO 



^ Appliance dealer finds 
that consistency pays off 
much hetter than his original 
costly splurges in "remotes" 



I he files are full of success stories 
showing what tv can do for retailers. 
But now you can add one in which a 
merchant began by using a lot of 
good ingredients to poor effect: then 
admitting his mistake freeh : and 
finally — after some thorough soul- 
searching and program reshuffling— 
coming up with a winner. 

When Samuel Boyd opened a com- 
bination warehouse-appliance store 
in downtown Springfield I Mass. I in 
l ( ).i3. he wanted to add to his ad\er- 
tising some of the glamorous trap- i 
pings that tv certainl) could offer. 
So he invested 10' < of his advertising 
budget in what amounted to a weekly 
"special" or "spectacular"" for his 
store (called Bailey -Wagner) . 

He bought into one of the most 
sure-fire things lie could think of —the 
Kim Broman Show on WW 1.1'. His 
portion eon>i-ted of a half-hour seg- I 
ment, which originated in his store i, 
and cost $400 a week in remotes 
alone. There was no doubt that Kitty n 
Broman had been moving loads of I 
merchandise on her woman's pro- Ij 
gram, but one special incident soon jf 
caused Boyd to wonder whether lii- 
particular use of Kitty Broman's 
ability wasn't a waste of talent. 

It happened when an ** \unt 
Jemima'' promotion (staged by 
Quaker Oats) was passing through 
town, stopped oil at his store, and 
was incorporated into the remote. 
It had all the showmanl) elements: 

• \ recognizable, interesting per- 
sonality 

• \ built-in wa\ to show off i 
range I Florence Range, now Ken 
more since the Sears, Roebuck pur 
chase ol the line I 

• A demonstration and use fea 

lure 

• Hieh memorability 



sI'UNSOU 



4 Arm i. 195! 



PROFIT BY A SPOT TV MISTAKE 



» \ ready-made draw Eoi crowds 

\ door check clicked oil l">(> spec- 

ptors. "The reason for the remotes 
Was certainly justified thai day 
Bo\d sa\s. "The theory being thai 

nice people are in the store they'll 

"all all oxer themselves to buy 

hiiiizs."* 

he only trouble," he says, "is 
hat they didn't."" 

If two cracker jack saleswomen 
"Aunt Jemima" and Kitt\ Broman) 

ouldn't turn the trick.. Boyd rea- 
oncd. an error in strategy was ol>- 
iousK involved. 

"' \ consistent schedule was need- 
d.'" he sa\s. "to coinhine lon^-range 
mpression with the impulse to buy." 

So the 8100 production cosl of the 

emotes was converted into more 
me. \\ ith this increase in t\ bud- 
et. a consistent schedule u;is begun 
1 a Saturday night mo\ ie. repeated 
n Sunda\ afternoon. This gave Boyd 
two-minute exposure per commer- 
al i three commercials per day) at 
ie same cost as the time and produc- 
er tab on the half-hour remote. 
' Moreover, it enabled him to re- 
vertise goods quickly which had 
■o\cd responsive to plugging in the 
i"i show. \ consistency pattern 
us look shape. 

In 1957, Bo\d opened his second 

liley-Wagner store in Springfield. 

ust September came a move to 

burhia (the third -lore was o|)ened 

W e-t Springfield) and here the 

krtising pattern really paid off. 

To the Saturday and Sunday movie 

hedule. Boyd has added (also on 

W I I' i the following: 

• \4inutes. Five 00-second spots 

r week at r>:'M) p.m. plug difTerent 

tders each day, "ii 1 1 1 i — week-in, 

ek-out pattern: Monday, Tuesday, 

sdnesday appliances; Tuesday, 

rniture; Thursday, bedding. The 

p\ pitch: "Three and a half more 

urs to go to Bailey-Wagner for 

se outstanding values." 

f • 20s. Five 20's (one per evening) 

Ip placed in prime time on run of 

•hedule. These discuss purchasing 

wit. mass display, low overhead, 

nt\ of free parking. \ rapid-fire 

{Please turn to page ~>2 i 



S3NS0R • 4 APRIL 1959 




Wasted talent. These two proven saleswomen ("Aunt Jemima" and WWLP's Kitty 
Broman) were inefficiently used by dealer. Steadier, less flashy strategy, did better for him 



llllllllllllliilllllllllllllli:!!:,;-!^^^!!!!..,:!!!!!!!!!!!!;;;!;;..^!!!!!!!;!! ';'i,, 



FOR BUILDING A RETAIL IMAGE 



this advertiser advises 



DO. 



1. // ork out a consistent 

spot schedule. Put ex- 
citement in the copy. 
('rente a desire to bin 
with 60-second anncts. 

2. Go "institutional" with 
20-s ec on d cop v. / 

rapid- fire up proa eh 
creates excitement, aids 
long, hard-sell spots 



DON'T . . . 

1 in est in isolated 
splurges. I he\ will onl\ 
puzzle your audience 

and put too large a 
strain on tin- budget 

\\ on \ too much ahoiit 
fancy trappings espe- 
cially il price is a big 
consideration with your 
customers 



3. 1 se I.I), s as reminders 3. Shun all-around patterns 



15 



I 

Capsule case histories of success^} 

local and regional radio cam) 



ULTS 



RESTAURANT 

SPONSOR: Bimbo's Drive-In Restaurant AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Bimbo's Drive-In Restaurant de- 
cided l<> advertise on WDGY, Minneapolis, for its grand 
opening. Bimbo's is located in Anoka, a small community 
about 20 miles north of Minneapolis-St. Paul. The restau- 
rant bought 30 one-minute announcements from Thursday 
through Sunday. Included in the content of the commercial 
was the fact that d.j. Dan Daniel, "The Tall Thin Texan," 
would he at the place 7-9 p.m. Friday. Result: Bimbo's oper- 
ated at capacity business mil onl\ during the hours of the 
personal appearance, but throughout the entire evening. 
Business amounted to $400 — a large sum for a place this size 
in one evening. But even more important to the restaurant 
the first evening was Bimbo's immediate recognition bj tin- 
people of Anoka and surrounding communities due to it- 
schedule on WDGY. The momentum of the opening, the 
manager reported, helped to make Bimbo's Drive-In a 
very successful operation within a short period of time. 

WIM,V Minneapolis Announcements 



APPLIANCES 

SPONSOR: Turner's TV & Appliance Shu, AGENCY : Direct 

Capsule case history: In a special campaign to promote 
the sale nl appliances, Turners of Merced, California, broad- 
cast a remote from 9 a.m. to (> p.m.. from their -hue. \ia 

KWII' Kail i' i. also uf Merced. California. Disk jockexs 
Johnny Borba and Jerry O'Neill greeted over 6,000 residents 
of the San Joaquin \ alle\ who came inlu the store during 
the broadcast. The radio station had their KWII' downs 
entertaining during the da\ and also had the radio station's 
searehlighl lighting up the area in the evening. Turner's, in 
conjunction with thi- remote broadcast, had a special sale 
on Hoffman radio and t\ sets. KWII' salesmen interviewed 
i ustomers as the) walked around the store and also demon- 
strated the various appliance-. Said one of the store 
representatives, '"I lii- i- the greatest public response Turner's 
has evei had, I'm going to ask Maxwell Hurst, I president "i 
KWIP), to let me borrow O'Neill and Borba as salesmen." 
KW IP, Merced, Cal. I', .gram 






SEWING MACHINES 

SPONSOR: Atlas Sewing Center AGE-NO Df 

Capsule case history: The Atlas Sewing Machine Cente: 
Mobile, decided to try radio in its market. I p until tk 
time only newspapers had been used. Atlas placed a te-j 
schedule on WMOZ, Mobile, for one week: the schedV 
consisted mostly of 60-second announcements during afte 
noon slots. Copy pitched both the Atlas sewing machin- 
and vacuum cleaners. No special inducement was offere- 
Reaction to the schedule was immediate: \tlas recefre 
some 500 phone calls and over 500 letters in a wed 
time. These prospects were followed up b\ the \tlas sale- 
men and 40% of the leads purchased either sewing machiiv 
or vacuum cleaners. Atlas is now using schedule- oi 
regular basis on the station and Frank J. Pellegrino. All: 
Sewing Machine manager, reported: "'WMOZ ha~ been 
completely successful medium for us and has consistent 
supplied our sales force with good prospects. Such can 
paigns have become an integral part of our business 

\\ MO/. Mol.il, VnnouncoM 



RESTAURANT 

SPONSOR: Buck's Restauranl \GENCV: D 

Capsule case history: More than l\\c \ears ago the Bucli 
Restaurant of \-he\ ille. N. (... purchased a five minutest 
menl in WW NC's Top <>' The Morning, featuring KeadW 
son as host. \l that time Buck's was ju>t another drive-: 
restaurant employing 20 people. The restaurant now boa- 
three large dining rooms as well as enlarged dri\e-in fan 
ties including tele-tray service. Up to 3.000 meals a day ar 
served in addition to a catering service specializing!' 
picnic- and banquets. Seventy-five regular employees cor 
prise the stafl plus 15 part-time people during the siimirr 
tourist season. In the five years Buck"- ha- been adxertisi 
on WW NC. the restauranl has quadrupled its business. I 
to 75', of the drive-in's advertising budget i- devoted' 
radio. <'nl\ a small portion goes to new -paper-, the remai 
ing to billboards and t\. '"W W N( ha- been a major fart 
in bringing the customers to buck s. ' said the <>wnr 
WW NC. Vshevilli IM R< II \SE: fan «poi 



i:: 



SPONSOR 



4 APRIL 1959 




Q 




What radio station do you listen to 
most of the time at night? 

WW DC was the clear-cut winner in a PULSE poll of 
Washington, D. C, area residents. Of particular interest 
is the pronounced majority we scored with the menfolk. 



This special qualitative PULSE survey shows many other areas of 
WWDC listening leadership-all of them of importance to adver- 
tisers. For the full report, write WWDC or ask your Blair man for a 
copy of "Personality Profile of a Radio Station." It's revealing! 

^^^^^^m ^^^^^^m R I I r Radl ° 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 

In Jacksonville, Fla., exciting WWDC-owned Station WMBR is 
rapidly changing the listening habits of a great growth market. 



NSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 






With the largest NAB convention completed, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What was your reaction to the NAB 



With more member stations 
brought together than ever before 
at the NAB convention, stations 
report what was accomplished 

Robert W. Ferguson, executive vice 
president. IT RTF-TV. Wheeling, West Va. 

I felt that this year's NAB Con- 
vention was one of the most effective 
I've ever been to from an industry 
standpoint. Many of the business 
sessions were just what the doctor 
ordered and many questions I had 
concerning labor relations, alloca- 
tions programing, equipment etc. 
were answered for me by one of the 
many forum meetings or sessions. 

Much of the government agency in- 
formation discussed at various ses- 
sions was also pretty pertinent to 
problems I encounter from time to 
time at my station and many ques- 
tions I had on these subjects were 
cleared up by the extremel) lively 
discussions. 

I heard a great deal of criticism 
concerning the fact that the film and 
package people weren't given the op- 
portunity to ballyhoo their products 
as they had in other \ears. I. for 



/ would 
like to see 
a Uv only' 
convention 



one. feel that the film people should 

be given a chance to show their 
properties but I don't feel that the 
convention should be turned into a 
circus to accommodate these supple- 
mental activities. 

We're still in the broadcasting 
business and I 111 just as much in- 
terested in whal I used i" broadcast 

a- I am in w hat I do broadcast. The 

equipment exhibits and the tremen- 
dous competitive spirit prevalenl in 

these equipment show ings li\ poed 



-,(. 




these normally dry showings quite a 
bit. The advances our industry has 
taken in the past few years makes it 
imperative that a station operator 
stay right on top of all developments, 
particularly, along technical lines. 

The way television is moving today 
the NAB Convention gives an opera- 
tor one of his few opportunities to 
see everything at one time and three 
days is hardly enough time to hear 
what you want to hear, see what you 
want to see, make decisions that have 
to be made on programs and equip- 
ment if you want to stay ahead of the 
competition and still get a chance to 
see your old friends. 

Frankly. I would like to see a 
"television only" convention. Not 
that I have anything against radio. 
luit television has widened its scope 
so much in the past few years that 
there is little enough time to cover 
the necessities. 

Maybe one day we'll get two sepa- 
rate conventions so that the tv people 
can concentrate on their end and the 
radio people can concentrate on ra- 
dio. I think on the whole this con- 
vention was a lively and educational 
one and the NAB should be given a 
pat on the back for its efforts. 

George Townsend, vice president. 

WWLP, Springfield. Mass. 

The NAB Convention each year is 
purported to be a convention "for 
the industry."" However, as usual, 
one portion of the industry was ne- 
glected and the convention turned out 
to It- the same one-side-of-the-coin 
storj it has been in the past. 

I'm referring of course to the uhf 
portion of the Industry. To the best 
of m\ recollection, there are still 
some Jill commercial uhf stations on 
the air. doing, I presume, a pretty 
good job of providing a television 
sen ice to the public 

However, on all sides at the ((in- 
vention the term uhf seems to carry 
the same connotation as measles or 



some such hands-oH illness. It seems 
strange to me that 80 members in 
good standing of their various < (im- 
munities should be pariahs at a con- 
vention where the avowed interest of 
the guiding organization is to create 
a better understanding of the indus- 




// de faulted 
on the uhf 
problem 






r * 

try's problems and to promote an 
interchange of ideas covering all 
areas of the television industry. 

Nowhere in the convention lineuj 
however, was there one session de 
voted to one of the most importafe 
problems facing the industry as i 
whole. The problem of what is goinf 
to happen to the uhf portion ol tin 
industry or. for that matter what i\ 
going to happen to the vhf portioi 
of the industry if certain emergency 
situations might arise. 

The convention policy seemed t| 
be "if we don't look at it maybe I 
will go away." I nfortunately. mani| 
of us have had our money and ou 
future invested in this partialis 
recognition from the powers-that-t 
that there is such a thins as uhf. 

As far as the remainder of the cot 
vention is concerned, the film peop 
and the equipment manufacture! 
have a different view of uhf activitii 
than our colleagues in that othi 
spectrum band as they seem to ha' 
devoted quite a bit of attention 
our needs. 

Now if some of that ohjectivi 
could filter down to the people wl 
arrange the summit discussions i 
the convention roster, who knov 
perhaps one of these convention tin 
the agenda might carry a session tr 
would be of interest to those (SO s 
tion operators. 



II 



sI'ONsOH 



I VPRIL 19 



meeting? 



reve Fayer, promotion director, II TOl 
Tl . Toledo 

I In- informal exchange oi ideas 
hicli tin- \ \l! convention engend- 
i> to me, its one most valuable 
set \iiiid the bluster and brag- 
ig thai seems to dominate all bull 
eions al the various hospitality 
ites there filters through an amaz- 
g number of good, solid, construe- 
e ideas. Ever) single person you 
•''I al the \ \l'». -[alien man oi 

Ferwise, as al least one original 
hie idea to contribute. 

\- promotion director for a tele- 
aon station which has been on the 

for onl) lour months, I'm on the 
•koul for new waj - and means of 
Dmoting and exploiting our audi- 

e superiority. Therefore, I was 
•re than happv to join other broad- 

,ri ~ in the main informal idea 
lies which came into being durins 
convention. Like Topsy, these 
lies "jesl growed" . . . oul of 
■sonal visits, the renewal of old 
aidships. etc. 



// litis (1 

health) 
exchange 

of ideas 



I 






|me of the mosl gratifying aspects 

these discussions was the willing- 

ol everyone concerned to share 

notion experience and often- 

. experience gained al the ex- 

<>f high advertising budgets 

wear and tear on stomach linings. 

jo give a (|iiiek. over-all picture 

•he convention, it seems that more 

adcasters are participating more 

velv in \ \B than ever before. 

jrear s convention was the big- 

am 1 . mosl important, the best to 



4 APRIL 1959 



i 



ADAM YOUNG HAS BEEN ASKED: 



O. K., Adam. You've 
told us what's wrong. 
What do you propose? 



\\ r' re heen outpohen in litis gpace on ratlin 

audience measurements. Of particular con* 
cerni Failure to report audience in the trading 
area. This failure has prevented comparison 

of stations on ihr basis of one area common 
to all — and most vital io today's advertisers. 

Result: Old-line thinking at the expense of '"mod 
ern" radio stations, and their proven ability to 9erve 
well in their trading areas. 







Adam Young 



Now our friend- an- asking what we propo-e. ""What are \ou doinjj thai - 
positive?" We weren I waiting to be asked. 

Foi man) month- we have been working out a new approach to the ques- 
tion. This week, in letters to virtuall) all I .S. advertising agencies and majoi 
advertisers, we made the project public. 

(fur proposals Lei the agenc) and advertise! determine survej areas, 
starting in two markets. 

The stations we represenl in these market- had been planning "area studies . 
Bui we said, "Win develop research onl) in term- of youi specific signal 
patterns? What a perfect opportunit) to give agencies and advertisers the 
area the) want!" 

To their everlasting credit, the stations agreed. Here's the [>ro- 
cedure: 

1. In our letters, we enclosed a questionnaire and a map for each market. 

2. We outlined -everal possible survey areas, based on trading area maps 
prepared b) American MapCompanv from "Population and It- Distribution, 
compiled and copyrighted by J. Walter Thompson. 

i. \.genc) and advertiser have the option of checking one of the areas we 

outlined, or designing another which better meets their need-. 

T Map- and questionnaires will be returned to The Pulse. Inc.. who will 
develop reasonable compromise areas for each market. 

5. Pulse will forward compromise area- for final approval and comment to 
ever) agenc) and advertiser who participates. 

6. Barring an) basic disagreement, Pulse will conduct an audience surve) 
of the newly-developed "Advertisei \na" for these two market-. 

7. Results will be issued to all Pulse subscribers, a- well a- all advertisers 
and agencies who participate. Eventually, we hope to extend thi- practice to 
ever) market Pulse surveys on a regular basis. 

If you received our letter, please return the map- and questionnaires on or 
before the deadline. The greater the participation, the greater the benefit to all. 

If your linn should have received a letter but b) some chance didn't, it - 
an oversight. Get in (ouch and well -peed the materials to you. 

ADAM YOUNG INC. 

Representing all that's modern and effective in radio today 

NEW YORK (3 E. 54TH ST.) • ATLANTA • CHICAGO • DETROIT 
LOS ANGELES • ST. LOUIS • SAN FRANCISCO 

AFFILIATED WITH: YOUNG TELEVISION CORPORATION & YOUNG CANADIAN LTD. 



-I 



POST MIDNIGHT RADIO 

i Cont <l from i>ai:<> 37 I 
to lii~ listeners). In the same category 
is a skin salve, which he launched in 
L953. \ unique "point of sale" stimu- 
lus occurred to him. He simph sug- 
gested that Koch Skin Salve could be 
purchased "at your favorite drug- 
store." In this way, he forced distri- 
bution in enough New York drug- 
stores to put it on the market. This 
stimulated the direct mail end of the 
business. Ko-Jo, Inc. now is thriving. 
(2) / itamins. Rosenfield also has 
a sizable interest in Allied Vitamins, 



which makes a product called "One 
for All." He introduced this in 1954. 
i ''> i Sleep remedy. Shur- V-Sleep 
Corp., another Kosenfield product, is 
having a brisk sale. 

(4) Sleep-King Electric Blanket. 

(5) Federal Life & Casually Co. 

(6) Movies. He's now : working on 
"The Diary of Anne Frank." 

i7i Stores. Hub Sewing Machine 
stores and Blumstein's I 12~>th Street) 
Department Store. 

(8) Washing Machines. The 
Washer Expert has had a six months' 
campaign. 



YOU'RE ONLY 

HALF-COVERED 

IN NEBRASKA 




IF YOU DON'T USE KOLN-TV! 






Hi 



neon 

Thi: :. I ncoln Land KOLN TV's NCS ^MF 

No. 3. Figures show percentages of TV M " mtM 

homes reached weekly, day or night ■ ]Ufj! 



NO OMAHA STATION COVERS LINCOLN! 



60 

| 40 

,30 

i 

£20 



OMAHA St 


ITI0* A 






































OMNI m 


no* i/> 




























(01* 


tv 


■omn« sum* c 



ARB 



19S6 



I9SS 
.///< -h/y i SPfafamA 

WWOTV_G»AND KPIDS KAlAMAiOO 

wi:o iwoto — kalama^oo iaim auu 

WJlf IAOIO — GRAND IAP1DS 

Witt 'M - GIAND lAflfJS UAlAMAiOO 

WWIV — CADILLAC MICHIGAN 

KOIN TV — tINCOlN, NtMAllA 



1957 

*. All 



19S8 

•o* mt a/» an. st 




One big market in Nebraska is in the 
extreme Fast. The oilier is Lincoln-Land 
— 66 counties Itij:. and well-heeled (con- 
taining more than HALF the buying 
power of the state!) 

Viewers in the extreme Eastern market 
spend a lot of time switching from one 
to another of the three TV stations they 
have available. In Lincoln-Land, the story 
is all KOLN-TV. It's the only station that 
covers the area. 

\*k \very-Kiioilel for all the faets on 

KOLN-TV the Official Basic CBS 
Outlet lor South Central Nebraska ami 
Northern Kansas. 



K0LNTV 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 1000-FT. TOWER 

COVERS LINCOLN-LAND — NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 

Aro'r Knodtl. Inc , Exc'ulrr* National A*pr*f«ntotiV»f 



(9) Religious Books. A staple of 
after-midnight radio in the Midwest 
and South, this product also has 
found acceptance in New ^ ork. 

i Id i Miscellaneous merchandise. 
\- with the transistor radios, Rosen- 
field has other Japanese imports 
going at quite a rate: cameras at 50 
per week, cigarette lighters at 1,000 
per month. 

What kind of copy approach da 
\ou use after midnight'.'' Here are 
two samples for divergent products: 

• Electric Blanket. "'Someone once 
asked a famous financier how he 
made his monej and he replied, 'I I 
hu\ m\ straw hats in the wintertime.' J 
Now you can be as wise by getting 
your electric blanket now. Not just a 
plain electric blanket, but the world- 
famous Sleep-King electric blanket 
for onl\ $19.75, which includes post- 
age, sales tax. everything delivered 
right to your door. . . ." 

• Insurance. "If \ ou are 85 years 
of age. you ha\e probably had trou- 
ble finding a hospitalization and doc- 
tor lull plan. Well, I have good news 
for \ ou. . . ." 

According to Big Joe. this hard, 
personal sell is absolutely essential 
to sHIino after midnight. ^ 



. 



APPLIANCE DEALER 

I Cont'd from \>age 45 i 

cop) approach creates excitement. 

• I.D.s. Five eight-minute an-! 
nouncements a week (one a night)' 
between 7:30 and 11 p.m. are a re« 
minder of the minute and the 20'tl 
"Shop Bailey-Wagner for best bat^ 
gains in all household furnishings. 

The nuts and bolts approach to hi 
use of tv — stripping awa\ of all non- 
essentials — has been concurrent with 
a business increase of 1.000' , . 

Currentl) . 65' < of Bailee A\ agnei 
ail hudgel goo into t\ the 15 spJ 
per week outlined above and t 
three two-minute commercials in bo 
the Saturday night and Sundax afte 
noon movie, all on WW I.I'. This 
in sharp contrast to the 10',' figu 
allocated at the start. 

Bo) d furthei ad\ ises the adverti&j 
to settle on a station thai "eoinbiw 
creativity with the treatment of 

old Famil) friend."' He points fl 
thai in his case the station helped hi 
all along with scripts, commerci 
ideas, etc. "as though it was th 
own product. 



52 



SPONSOR 



1 M'KII. 195 



USD 




WHEREVER THEY GO! 



April— USO Month 



• 267 USO clubs and lounges around the world 

• USO mobile services to remote Nike and radar sites 

• USO show troupes regularly touring overseas military bases 



Listed in the April Radio-TV Bulletin 
of the Advertising Council 



GIVE USO THE EYES AND EARS OF THE 

NATION DURING APRIL I 



SPOT'S PAPER JUNGLE 

i Cont'd from paiir .'>.'-> i 

The question usualb raised when 
.1 i learing house for spot i- suggested. 
is: "How are you ever going to gel 
a majorit) of some 3.000 radio and 
500 i\ station managements to gel 
together, when they're so competi- 
tive?" The answer is that somebody 
did it and made it work with the 
music publishers and they can 

scared) he called non-competitive. 

"If broadcasting could onlj begin 
all over again," said one adman, "so 
man\ things could be done different!) 

and more simply. In the case of 
spot, both radio and tv have out- 
grown their bookkeeping s\ stems. The 
value nl both media keeps increasing, 
but the machinery of its bookkeeping 
remains a primitive art." 

Ki \ in Sweeney, president of Radio 
Advertising Bureau, sees three major 
problems in spot buying: I 1 i rate 
cards. (2) paperwork. (3) 'familx 
resemblance." On the subject of 
paperwork, Sweeney says, "Much of 
the paper which is exchanged in buy- 



ing spot has no real function because 

the paperwork is done after a cam- 
paign is under way. If we trust one 
another well enough to put a cam- 
paign on the air on verbal orders," 
asks Sweenev. "do we really need to 
follow up with as much papers as we 
now use?" 

Sweenex explains the "'lamiK re- 
semblance" problem as follows: 
"When a station representative goes 
in to sell, it's helpful if rate cards of 
stations on his list bear some resem- 
blance to one another. Then he can 
at least present a simpler bu\ for the 
part of the medium he represents." 

As for rate card structures, he says. 
"L nlike newspapers, radio rate cards 
\ar\ to the point of confusion. A 
decision to make a bu\ cannot be 
based on a clean-cut decision to pick 
this or that plan: and there's no 
pattern within a market or by station 
t\pes. A major job of persuading 
stations to simplify their rate cards 
has to be done which is something 
we've undertaken within RAB." 

On the side of definition, the Storz 



Cincinnati, Ohio? Bangor, Maine? 
Savannah, Georgia? 




NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 



Drug Sales 
Vutomol i\ i Sales 
General Merchandise 

I iil.il Retail S.ilrs 



$ 40,355,000 
$ 299,539.000 
$ 148,789.(1(1(1 

*l.'J8li.'_ , 55.lM><l 



Population 1,520,100 

Households 423,600 

( i hi- i i Spendable lm ome 

$1,761,169,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486.000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 79.4° SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to December 1958 ARB we average 79.4° of audience from Sign On to Sign Off 7 days a 
week. During 363 weekly quarter hours it runs 80°b to 98° . 



KNOE-TV 



CBS • A B C 
A James A. Noc Station 
Channel 8 Represented by 

Monroe, Louisiana H - R Television, inc. 

Photo: Forest Products Division, Olin-Mathieson Chemical Corp., West Monroe. Louisiana. 



stations pioneered a meticulous defin- 
ing of what constitutes a national and 
what constitutes a local advertiser. 
By their definition, the advertiser who 
can qualify for local rates is one 
whose copj is mostl) local, whose 
billings emanate from a local agency, 
and whose bills are paid through a 
local hank. 

In the move toward a single rate 
for all. the first station group to come 
up with such a plan is the Balahan 
Stations. "We felt." said John F. 
Box. executive vice president of the 
chain, "that the time is long over- 
due for all radio stations to face up 
to the fact that one of the greatest 
detriments to our business is the 
existence of a system of multiple 
prices for similar service. There is 
only one answer, and that is the 
single rate card for all advertisers, 
national, local and regional." To put 
it into effect. Balahan stations are 
gambling on 8100.000 in lost billing* 
this year." 

The local rate problem, while not 
directly responsible for the spot 
paperwork jungle, is certainly a con- 
tributing factor. The question of an 
agency paying full price is invariably. 
"Who's getting it wholesale? and a 
lot of checking frequently goes into 
finding out. 

"If I were giving a break to an\- 
body," said one station rep to SPON- 
SOR, "it would be to the national 
advertiser. Giving the cheaper rate to 
the local advertiser is the reverse of 
what it should be: he gains the most 
and should pay the higher rate — if 
there must be any difference at all.' 
Beyond the double rate lies a wid- 
ening; area of grief t<> agcnc\ men 
involved in the paperwork of a spot 
buy. This is the complication within 
the rate structures of a single station. 
Ml of these complications could be 
summed up in the words — "FrequeJ 
c\ discount. " 

Newspapers smoothed out their op- 
erations aftei man) years b) eliminat- 
ing these complex discounts. Today, 
probabU less than 1<H) newspaper 
arc complicating rate rani- with sua 
"rewards for frequent use." How- 
ever, il has been noted of late, that 
a trend is developing among print 
media for a return to frequency dis- 
counts. "Il wuiilil be inmic. said 
one adman, "if uewspapers would 
now start to match spot in confusion." 
Continued next week & 



54 



SI'OXSOH 



1 M'KII. 1 ( 1")9 



ANPA FOUL-UP 

i Cont'd from page I 1 I 

for the various media and came up 
with the fact thai the -|><'t radio 
figure averaged $3. 15 againsl news- 
papers sl2.1T. This, declared Miss 
Gibson, comes out as a cost efficiency 
.'>' ■_■ times greater than that of radio. 

rhe K&E media comparison gave 
spot radio the lowest cost-per- 1,000 
of all the media analyzed. I he com- 
parison included 1,500-line newspa- 
per ads in l>oih black-and-white and 
color, a minute in network t\ at 
bight, a minute (or 20-second) com- 
mercial in spot i\ in prime time, a 
minute on spot radio in the earl) 
morning, one-page four-color ads in 
three national magazines and one- 
feage, four-color ads in five Sunday 
supplements. 

Highest percent of noters was 

earned l>\ network t\. which was giv- 
en credit for two-tliirds of the pro- 
gram audience. Cos t-per- 1,000 im- 
pressions on network t\ came to $5.63 
compared with SO.O 1 on spot t\. Maii- 
a/ines had the highest cost-per-1,000. 
I he three magazines measured (Life, 
Look, and Header's Digest) ranged 
between $12.35 and $14.84 

The Pulse newspaper stud) previ- 
ous!) mentioned was dune three years 
ago for the Southern California 
Broadcasting \»n. It covered ads in 
the Los Angeles Times, Examiner. 
Herald-Express and \lirror-\en s 
anion" a sample of 500 families. 

Like Pulse's radio studies, all re- 
spondent- were included in the base 
for ad noting, whether or not thev 

had bought or seen the paper. Ad 
was credited with having been read. 
Been or noted b) the home if an) one 
or more persons in the household 
identified the ad. The simplesl scan- 
ning of the ad was credited. Re- 
spondents who reported that thev 
onl) remembered seeing the ad with- 
out reading am of the content or de- 
tail were credited with having read 
the new -paper ad. 

In comparing Starch newspaper 
"tin:: s<n res with radio commercial 
audiences, the R. of \. used newspa- 
per studies co\erin« the years 1952- 
^>0. Four categories of ads were 
cited: foods, housing equipment and 
upplies. radio and t\ programs, 
Oaps and cleansers. The median si/e 
f ads measured ran between ~i~ and 
line- and noting scores for both 
en and women were listed. ^ 



■ 



n, 



ffou* (fiff it </<*{ so /<!»<• so an hi? 

Advance reservations are running heavy 
for the Storz Stations Second Annual 

INTERNATIONAL RADIO PROGRAMMING 
SEMINAR and POP MUSIC 
DISC JOCKEY CONVENTION 

May 29-30-31, Americana Hotel, Miami Beach 

Reason? Tremendous success of lasl year's Kansas Citj confab Almosl 
before thai one adjourned, reservations started coming in For 1959, 

site unseen. Now that news of city. site, hotel and program IS out, 

the mail turned heavy. Suddenly it's late almosl too late. Space in 

the seven hotels of I'.al Harbour i- going fast. Soon we'll have to 

berth you elsewhere on the Beach. 



So don't he shut out — rush the registration form belov i" 
. . . convention coordinator for the Storz Stations. 



Stew art 



MEET AND HEAR: Barold Fellows, 
President, NAB; John Blair, Preai 
dent, John Blair & Co.; John Box, 
Exec. v.l\, Balaban Station; Matthew 
.1. Culligan, Exec. V.P., NBC; Bob 
Eastman, President, Robert Eastman 
('ii.; Harvey Glascock, General Man- 
ager, YV1IK. Cleveland; Marty Hogan, 
General Manager, WCFI, Chicago; 
Harold Krelstein, Pres., The Plough 
station-: Gorden McClendon, Presi- 
dent, the McLendon Stations; Duncan 
Mounsey, Exec. V.P., WPTB, Albany; 
Bob Purcell, V.P., G.M., KFWB, Los 
Angeles; Frank Stisser, President, 
C. E. Hooper, Inc.; Adam Young, 
President, A. lam Young Enc; Martin 
Block, WABC, N.w York; Ira Cook, 
K.MI'c, Los Angeles; Howard Miller, 
WIND, Chicago. 

Discuss these and a score more vital 

-ill. jed 9 : 

"Humanizing the Format Machine" 
"Public Service in the Formal station" 
"Counter Programming to Top 10" 
"Programming of Music on Network 

Affiliates" 
"Trends in M uaic" 



Meet, hear and thrill to thi big — .- « 1 1 1 r- 
day Nighl All star Show, featuring 
Peggy Lee . . . George Shearing . . . 
and man] othei stars to be announced. 

NO COST TO YOU FOB W\ OF 
THE FUNCTIONS . . . including 
meals, Saturday night's banquet ami 
show. These are i om pl< telj under 
■a lit ten by America's 1 « - .- 1 ■ 1 i i z 
com pa aies tlms your expensi - 
limited to transportation and hotel ac- 
commodations, all of which are tas 
deductible, according to competenl 
legal counsel. 

CONVENTION OPENS with cocktail 
party Thursday evening . . . business 
sessions Friday . . . Saturday and until 
noon Sunday. 

REGISTRATION GRATIS . . . and 
open to all Disc Jockeys . . . Program 
Directors . . . Record thdustrj Man 
agem'enl Personnel . . . Broadi 
Industry Management Peraonnel. 





...........RUSH 


TO BILL 

ilpatriclc Bui Ic 


STEWART- 






Convention Coordinator 
The Ston Stations, 820 K 


ing, Omaha 2, Nebraska 


1 Name 












I Address 












J Station 


or Company Affiliation 










1 Type of 


room 










' Rate desired (approx.) 

1 Rates in Hotels of Bal Harbour stcrt 


at $10 daily f 


or two. 





SPONSOR 



1 ipril 1959 






How to end miscues and 
other costly errors 




tor 






Accessory o«° 



are no* 



ioe 
ib\e- 




Your RCA Broadcast 

Ixeprcsciitatirc has the 

whole story. Or write 

for literature. 



. . . use the RCA TP-6 

Professional Film Projector 

Now, in addition to the regular quality points that have made the TP 
famous, three new features are offered. They include Automatic Cu 
Rapid Start, Magnetic Stripe Playback! 

AUTOMATIC CUE 

Now you can stop projectors at any predetermined film frame so th 
your next film sequence is cued and ready for show immediately. 

RAPID START 

Rapid start feature provides sound stabilization in less than one secor 
You can activate projector start and video switch buttons alm< 
simultaneously, thus eliminating roll cues and reducing the char 
for errors. 

MAGNETIC STRIPE PLAYBACK 

Superior reproduction of sound from 16mm. films is made possiblt 
adding a magnetic sound system. Speed preparation of noes tilms 
reducing process time required between coverage and actual airi 
Make your own film programs and commercials, and apply comments 
music and sound effects this easy way ! 

You can do all this and gain the business protection and efficient opt 
tion that comes from the TP-6's well-known built-in features . . . incl 
ing automatic projector lamp change, gentle film handling, qui 
change exciter lamp, superior picture and sound quality. 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 



Tmk(s) u, 



BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT 
CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 



H hat \ happening in I . S. Government 
ilmi affects tponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



4 APRIL 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Congress, long dormant on the broadcasting front, may start one project rook- 
ing shortly alter the Easter recess. 

The Senate Commerce Committee will likely be the first to gel into action. It will he back 
with the old problem of tv allocations. The FCC worked through the Easter recess, prepar- 
ing for a possible call to testify once more, as it has on this subject before the same Commit- 
tee through the years. 

In view of the TASO report, tossing in the sponge on uhf, it is expected that FCC chair- 
man John C. Doerfer will be able to persuade other commissioners to his viewpoint in favor 
of abandonment of uhf. That is, as any solution for getting more tv stations on the air. 

The new tack appears set to involve trading all uhf and vhf channels 2 through for 
additional vhf space now occupied by the armed services. The FCC is asking for 38 
new channels immediately above present channel 13, but will settle for 25 or even fewer. 

The Senate Commerce Committee has been a stronghold for uhf. It issued a report prais- 
ing a dormant FCC proposal to switch all or a major portion of tv to uhf. However, last year 
the committee showed considerable enthusiasm for horse-trading to acquire more vhf channels. 



Meantime the Association of Maximum Service Telecasters has submitted to the 
FCC a "five-point'" platform outlining its position on tv allocations. 

The five points, as contained in the AMST statement to the FCC : 

1) The existing 12 vhf channels are absolutely essential for tv broadcast service and 
hence must be retained. 

2) In view of the findings of the TASO report regarding the comparative performance 
of vhf and uhf frequencies for tv broadcasting, it would appear to be most desirable in the pub- 
lic interest for additional vhf frequencies to be allocated — either between channels 6 and 7, or 
above channel 13, or both. 

3) If an appropriate amount of additional vhf spectrum space is allocated to tv broadcast- 
ing, part of the uhf spectrum now allocated to tv broadcasting could be exchanged, if 
necessary, for the additional vhf frequencies. 

4) No part of the uhf spectrum now allocated to tv broadcasting should be reallocated 
to other services unless additional vhf is forthcoming. 

5) Present wide-area service must be maintained on the existing 12 vhf channels to insure 
maximum service to the American public, including rural and small-town areas. 



The Supreme Court will shortly have the final word on whether a broadcasting 
station may be forced to permit a politician to make a speech over its facilities, 
with no right to censor, and then may be sued for libel because of what the candi- 
date says. 

The highest court heard arguments in the \\ DAY-TV, Fargo, N. D., case, and if it issues 
a clear-cut ruling, the libel position of broadcasters under Sec. 315, the political equal time 
communications act provision, will finally be clarified. 

North Dakota courts had exonerated the station of libel charged in the case, and the suing 
candidate took the issue to the Supreme Court. 



•ONPOR 



4 april 1959 



57 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



4 APRIL 1959 The tightening up on promotion concessions made in recent syndication deals 

cwyright iB59 may be a bellwether of a hardening of film prices for the fall. 

sponsor L as t year some syndicators made concessions for promotion running as high as 200% 

publications inc. ,,f the one week price; one $1,500 a week New York deal involved a $3,000 promotional 

bonus. 

It's taken as normal for the syndicator to concede around one-third of the one week 
price lor monies the station and sponsor can spend in tune-in ads, merchandising items, etcJ 
which amounts to less than 1% of the 52-week commitment. 



Inter-network competition for the fall is having drastic consequences on syn- 
dication with some of its choicest time periods suffering recapture. 

Take 10:30 p.m. Saturday, for example, where CBS to counter NBC's entry into the slot 
with network programing took back the half-hour — one of the highest rated half-hours in all 
syndication — for the Schlitz show with Ray Milland. 

The solution for these dispossessed sponsors appears to be this: move the show over 
to ABC stations at the same hour to keep the audience. 



A new syndication sales strategy on national spot programing will have to 
developed as a result of time clearance bottlenecks. 

While syndication has sometimes been sold as a pinpoint device for network markel 
needing bolstering, the national spenders have found that availabilities and not their ini- 
tial plan shaped the campaign map. 

Don't be surprised if the syndicators switch from selling syndication as a medium to hi 
used in addition to network to the concept of syndication as a medium to be used ii 
stead of network. 



You can expect Kellogg's to help itself to another bowl of national spot p 
granting in the fall via Leo Burnett. 

Quick Draw McGraw, another animated children's series, will undoubtedly follow t 
formula worked out for Screen Gems' Huckleberry Hound, which went into 190 markets 1 
fall, mostly between 5:00 and 7:00 p.m., where half-hours are relatively easy to find, and led 
it- time periods in 84 of 92 cities reported by ARB in the fourth quarter. 

The show was able to get time in all the 10 largest markets except San Francisco and 
Pittsburgh to score ARB ratings like these: 






MARKET RAT1M: STATION 

Mew York 13.0 WPIX 

Los Angeles 9.4 KNXT 

Chicago 18.3 WGN-TV 

Philadelphia 7.7 \YHC\-T\ 

Detroit 13.6 CK1.W 

Boston 11.9 WNAC-TV 

St.Louis 11.5 KSD-TV 

Washington, D. C. 9.2 WBC-T\ 



58 



DAY 


\\0 TIME 


Thurs. 


6:30 p.m. 


Tues.. 


6:30 p.m. 


\\ «■,!.. 


7:30 p.m. 


Thurs. 


5: HO p.m. 


Thurs. 


7:00 p.m. 


Thurs. 


6:30 p.m. 


1 Inn 5. 


5:30 p.m. 


Thin-.. 


(.:()() p.m. 


SPONSOR • 


4 APRIL 10.5 






un. 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The only real objection iii.it li.i- -|>i mi- up in Canada to I . S« television film 
in against the series that glorifies U. S. service forces. 

As a corrective, some series like Flight have tried to involve the Canadians in episodes 
based on records of Canadian forces. 

The importance of Canada to film economics is pointed out by Paul Talbot of distribu- 
tor's representative Fremantle. For instance, the maximum for a li. S. series i- $3,000-5,000 
per week, plus an additional $2,000-2,500 for the French language network. 



Keep your eye on this danger sign: the ratings potential of syndication in 
March this year appeared to have fallen off a few points compared to last year. 

If you compare Telepulse charts in SPONSOR last month with those of March 10.")!! vou'll 
find that the top 10 shows slumped from a range of 24.4 to 18.7 in their averages 
down to from 20.2 to 15.6. 

Shows that stayed in production retained their ratings status in general, but the worst 
slumps were suffered by the series that had no more new episodes to offer and where 
the re-runs probably got into a poorer time period. 



A major reshuffling of audience loyalties in hotly contested markets like New 
York has taken place since last season with syndication a major weapon of the in- 
dependents to hold on to ratings. 

WPIX, for example, reports stable ratings in the midst of a combined networks and in- 
dependents fight that has hurt other outlets. 

The money behind WPIX's current "Blocknight" plan, is largely national spot in partici- 
pations. New buyers lured by WPIX this season include Tareyton, L&M, Philip Morris, Miles 
Labs, Zest, Joy, Colgate, Lipton, Borden, Ovaltine, American Chicle, Minute Maid and others. 



COMMERCIALS 



Look for the networks to get into the fight for tape commercials business — a 
switch on past policies of quietly accommodating existing program clients with tape 
services. 

Up until recently various tape producers have benevolently lent their technicians to one 
another in an effort to get the bugs ironed out of tape procedures. 

But the new attitude is expected to be one of competitive self-interest with coop- 
eration fairly rare — a sure sign that tape commercials has already outgrown one stage of its 

infancy. 



A new Schwerin study has come to the defense of the before-and-after technique 
so frequently used in drug and remedy commercials. 

The before-and-after scored 105 compared to 98 for other types. 

On the same effectiveness scale of 100 as average, the straight before-and-after was tops 
with 121. and the reversed after-and-before switch was still good with 112. but two other tech- 
niques fared poorly. 

The two approaches that compared unfavorably were the before-and-after commer- 
cial that showed the product in use, with a 96 score, and least effective at all v\a- the 
commercial that simultaneously showed before-and-after in a split screen, scoring only 91. 



ONSOR • I VI'RIL 1959 59 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



4 APRIL 1959 Even the aircraft manufacturing business may wind up in the tv specials fold: 

coiiyright 1959 F&S&R is talking to Grumman about doing one for them next season. 

Jt would be something along the lines of Wide, Wide World, running 90 minutes. 



Apparently Madison Avenue's knack for appropriating the latest pet Washington 
phrase isn't working this time. 

Nobody on the ad or marketing side has as yet flung the word ''posture" in a trade 
speech or announcement. 



Agency managements have discovered that stock options aren't enough to keep ex 
ecutives from succumbing to offers from other agencies. 

They now have to sweeten the pot with annuities, payment of country club dues, 
and similar fancy fringes. 

An eager-beaver salesman for one of the radio networks has this way of net 
tling the agencies he covers: 

Mailing carbon copies of his bid for a piece of business to the account's chairman 
of the board, president, general manager, and ad manager. 



Watch for the print clan to urge Washington to increase the number of tv 
channels. Reason: This could logically lead to more tv networks. 

Expected result: Fractionalizing the tv audience by market and network to the point 
where the cost-per-1,000 is about on a level with or above print. 



Maybe it's because of some nudging from his board of directors or personal introspe 
tion, but the head of a company heavy in tv has abandoned his tendency to act like 
a George Washington Hill among his associates and agency people. 

As a person to do business with, he's lately become far more tolerant, tractable 
and reasonable. 



Because of the sensitivity of tv in measuring consumer response, the day of the 
prolonged test for new products is, marketingmen feel, on the way out. 

Once the new product is amply and properly stocked, the manufacturer can now get 
schedule going quickly, gather his reaction data quickly, and put the item on a national 
basis much faster than just a few years ago. 



Wholesale changes may result from a personnel screening now taking place i: 
one of the bigger agencies. 

The big boss not so long ago laid down a set of concepts and procedures that 
he expected his executives to follow minutely. Now those found unable to mesh with t 
program will in due time be weeded out. 



i 



, 



Ml SPONSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 



*0 




r 



K /-, NTUCKV - 



\ 



TKN.NE S £ E B 





4 







■ 



This is the $2 3 /a Billion WSMpire . . . 
America's 13th Largest Radio Market 



WNED 
PONSOR 



No national advertising campaign plan can be complete without 
including the WSMpire . . . 

No other combination of media can sell the nation's 13th largest 
radio market as effectively and as economically as WSM . . . 

Strong words ... but Bob Cooper, or any Blair man. can show facts, 
figures and actual case histories to prove that WSM, single handed- 
ly, delivers a market exceeded in importance by only 12 other areas 
in these United States. 

'Katz Agency Market Sludy, Broadcasting, December 16. 1957 

WSM Radio 

Key to America's 13th Radio Market 

50 000 Watts 'Clear Channel • Blair Represented • Bob Cooper, Gen. Mgr. 



AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 

• 4 Ai'KiL 1959 M 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



A BLANK, MY LORD is one of the ways Shakespeare describes ratings in this Nielsen plaque 
presented to NAB president Hal Fellows ( I ) by Henry Rahmel, v. p. and general manager of 
Nielsen. "Mr. Shakespeare on Ratings" first appeared in SPONSOR'S "10-Second Spots" column 




REHEARSING Multiple Sclerosis song are (I 
to r) Al Lamm, WOW, Omaha; Walter John- 
son, local MS chairman; Sybil Hatch, MS vic- 
tim; Dick McCord, local MS head; Joe Martin, 
WOW. D.j.'s Lamm and Martin wrote the song 



WHOOPING IT UP: NBC newsman Bob Mc- 
Cormick, made honorary chief of Blackfeet 
Indian tribe for his efforts on behalf of 
American Indians, beats the drums while In- 
dian brave Birdshead does a tribal dance 





ADVERTISERS 



K. J. Reynolds will again sponsor 

six shows on the tv networks this 
fall. 

The indications are that it will con- 
tinue If agon Train. Lawman and / we 
Got a Secret. There'll be a newcomer, 
Johnny Staccato on NBC. 

The replacements: the Bob Cum- 
mings and Phil Silvers shows. Rey- 
nolds would have been content to 
continue with Silvers, but CBS is in- 
clined to call it a network run. 

Incidentally. Reynolds has quite an 
investment in commercials built 
around the series troupe. 






Campaigns: 

• Eastman Kodak Co. will be 
focusing their cameras on the tv 
screens this June, via a five-consecu- 
tive-day promotion on the three tv 
networks. Designed for summertime 
picture taking. Kodaks "5-Day Tele- 
rama" (13-17 June) will include the 
U.S.G.A. Open Golf show. Ed Sulli- 
van, a 90-minute Disney special, / 
Love Lucy and Ozzie & Harriet. 







TEN YEARS FROM NOW bigger and 
better say (I to r) Walter Guild, David 
Bascom and Dan Bonfigli, as they celebrate 
10th anniversary of Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli 



C2 



SPONSOR 



4 April 1959 



Vgencj l"i Kodak : l\\ I . 

• Gardner Advertising has come 
up with some radio spots l"i South- 
western Hell Telephone Co. thai 
let \ mi hear color \ ia music. Devel- 
oped to promote color extension tele 
phone-, the campaign breaks this 
week in the 30 cities served l>\ the 
Hell Co., i" run for one month, 

Sylvania and Ford have accom- 
plished the unusual in this re- 
spect* a I""' item linked with a 
(3,000 item in a contest. 

The contest : "Picture ^ ourself in 
a '59 Ford," designed t<> sell flash- 
bulbs and at the same time bring peo- 
ple into Ford dealershops t<> liave 
their pictures taken b) photoflash. 

The contesl ends 15 April. I. Wal- 
ter Thompson, which has l»<>th ac- 
counts, developed and staged the 
promotion. 

Treasurer's report: Pepsi-Cola's 

l { ).">i! year broke all record- in sales 
and earnings. The figures: earnings 
alter taxes totaled si 1 ,5 million, com- 
pared t>> $9.6 million in 1 ( ).~>7 . . . 
The Maytag Co. estimates that sales 



dm big the lii-t quarter w ill total ap- 
proximate!) $30 million, up about 
20' i I mm the In si quai tei of L958, 
w ith eai nings Foi the Eoi mer quai tei 
close i" $3 million, compared to $1.8 
million foj the same pei ii id last year. 

Pet Milk Co. has established a re- 
search and development division, con- 
centrated in the company - Green- 
\ ille. III. center. 

Man) Heineman, formerl) head 
id the St. Louis research <li\ ision, 
will be director ol product develop- 
ment and Dr. Karl Louder will be 
direct I research. 

Strictl) personnel: R. P. Ed- 
wards, named manage i ol ad\ertis- 
ing and sales promotion foi Westclox 
Division ol Genera] Time . . . Eric 
Younger, appointed director of ad- 
vertising ami sales promotion lor the 
Manhattan Shirt Co. . . . Malcolm 
Stewart, treasurer of the (1 Metre Co., 
elected a v.p. . . . Seymour Melbe- 
gott. promoted to the newly-created 
post ol sales promotion manager for 
the Pepsodent di\ ision ol Lever . . . 
II. William Coulthurst, to head ad- 



vertising and sales promotion at th< 
Speidel Corp. 



AGENCIES 



V« had been expected on Madi- 
son Avenue, ^ «S. 1% this week won 
the Bweepstak.es for the $6 mil- 
lion imerican Airlines account. 

\Ih,iii in agencies were aftei the 
business. ( Ine of them. F&S&R, had 
included in it- presentation a recom- 
mendation ol an annual t\ special 
plus continuing spol in the regions 
sei \ iced b) American. 

MacManus, John «\ idams is 
lining up anothei series ol eight t\ 
specials Foi Pontiac during the 1959- 
60 season. 

Pontiac's othei ah media plans Foi 
the coming season are -till in 
planning stage. 

Burke Dowling \dams and St. 
Georges & Keyes have merged to 

Form \ilain- & Keyes in N.Y., ( Ihi- 
cago and I,. \.. with combined annual 
billings of SI 6 million. 






TURNABOUT — Colgate throws a party for hostess Bess Meyerson of 
tv's The Big Payoff, now in its seventh year. Shown here with her: Gor- 
don Cates (I), sr. v.p., L&N; Stuart Sherman, Colgate v.p., corp. mlctg. 




\ MEETING OF THE TV CODE REVIEW BOARD of the NAB 
rings these members together (I to r): Mrs. A. Bullitt, KING-TV, Seat- 
le; E. K. Hartenbower, KCMO-TV, Kansas City; Mrs. H. McClung, 
iHSL-TV, Chico, Cal.; Gaines Kelley, WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C. 





ROLL OUT THE BARREL: That's what WHK, Cleveland, did to intro- 
duce "Strat-O-Phonic" sound — with, of course, these models in them 



63 



New officers: Stanley Keyes, who 
was president of his agency, becomes 
chairman, headquartered in New 
York; Adams will continue as presi- 
dent and operate out of Atlanta: Ed- 
ward Hoffman, named executive v.p.; 
Alfred Anthony, senior v.p. and cre- 
ative director; Thomas Dixcy, senior 
v.p. and secretary and Jack Hard), 
senior v.p. and general manager. 

The Atlanta office of Burke Dow- 
ling Adams will continue under that 
name. 



New agencies: Lee Peer, formerly 

operations and programing consul- 
tant to KSHO-TV, Las Vegas, has 
formed a new agency: Adler, Peer 
& Associates, at 810 West Keno 
Lane, Las Vegas . . . Rich, Bryan 
& Curtis, at 50 East 42nd Street, 
New York, with Bill Bich as presi- 
dent . . . Wilhur-Ciangio and the 
H. E. Beekman Co.. both in New 
York, have merged to form Wilbur- 
Ciangio, Beekman & Packard, 
Inc. with Harry Beekman. chairman 
and Joseph Packard, president. 




5«ual8«3 



ostw 




uu 



Oscar Mayer's 

dollar buys more 

on WKOW 



". . . Our 75th Anniversary 
sales campaign on WKOW 
was made even more effec- 
tive by the complete and ag- 
gressive merchandising help 
provided by WKOW's Mer- 
chandising Director Jim Mil- 
ler. His calls on grocers, his 
success with display installa- 
tions and his thorough cov- 
erage of the trade with mer- 
chandising letters added im- 
measurably to the selling im- 
pact of the campaign." 

Clay Kent 

Sales Promotion Manager 

OSCAR MAYER & CO. 



We are proud of the part ive played 
in your 75th anniversary celebration. 
Thank you, Wherry, Baker & Tilden, 
Inc. for this opportunity to prove that 
WKOW -TV is first in selling a buying 
Madison and soatln rn \Vis( onsin. 
Ben I Eovel 

Gene) a I Manager 
Represented Nationally by Headley-Reed 



WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 



TV-Q 



RADIO- 10 KW- 1070 



Agency appointments: American 
Cynamid Co., for its institutional ad- 
vertising, to EWR&R . . . American 
Silicone Co., Denver, for its adver- 
tising and product development, to 
Cunningham & Walsh, San Fran- 
cisco . . . The Automotive Division 
of Gough Industries, to Carson- 
Roberts, Inc., Los Angeles . . . Os- 
row Products, for its new Wash 'N 
Wax auto detergent, to Smith- 
Greenland, New York. 

Winner: Jack Fennell, of William 
Esty awarded a vacation trip to Las 
Vegas and Hollywood for his win- 
ning slogan in the KBAK, Sacramen- 
to-Stockton contest. 






On the personnel front: Albert 
Petcavage, formerly assistant v.p. 
and media supervisor at Ted Bates, 
joins Doyle Dane Bernbach as media 
director . . . Ray Mauer, a v.p. and 
member of the board of Geyer. 
Morey, Madden & Ballard, appointed 
creative director . . . Norman 
Frank, director of radio and tv at 
Lynn Baker. Inc.. New York, named 
a v.p. . . . Pamela Wood, to v.p. 
and copv director of Silton Brothers. 
Callawav. Inc.. Boston . . . John 
Williams leaves Cunningham & 
Walsh, where he was senior v.p.. to 
join Henderson Advertising. Green- « 
ville, S. C. as v.p., creative director I 
and member of the executive com- 1 
niittee. 



FILM 



Months of negotiations between 
the Buckeye Corporation and 
Transfilm ended last week in suc- 
cessful arrangements for an ac- 
quisition by means of a stock 
transfer. 

It is reported that $700.<HMl in 
Buckeve stock went to Transfilm as 
its outlay for the acquisition. 

Buckeye's holdings in tv alreadv in- 
clude Flamingo Films. Pyramid Pro- 
ductions and some film property 
rights. 

Moves bolstering Buckeye holdings 
1 ;i-t week wiih broadcast veterans in- 
cluded tin' hiring of Alexander 
(Sandy) Stronach as sales v.p. m 
Flamingo. 

International sales: Fremantle of 
Canada reports ,i lo'O' , hillings in- 
crease l<>r I9."><> over the previous 



64 



M'oVM.Hi 



1 Al'KIL 1959 







.-■■^^-"'- 



Families in the WKY-TV coverage area 
buy 70% of all the food products sold 
in Oklahoma. 
(More people are sold on WKY-TV.) 





Oklahoma City NBC Channel 4 



The WKY Televiiion Syitem, Inc 
WKY Radio. Ok!«hom« City 

WTVT. T»mp«-St. Petersburg. FU. 
WSFA-TV. Montgomery. Ala. 






Hot Springs, Ark. 

Pop. 33,800 

is larger than 

Midland, Texas 
Pop. 64,700 

in General Merchandise Sales 

La Crosse, Wise. 

Pop. 79,700 

in Drug Store Sales 

Sheboygan, Wise. 
Pop. 91,900 

in Apparel Store Sales 

Ask Us "Why" 

KBHS 

5000 wafts at 590 kc 

113 Third St., Hot Springs, Ark. 



The Radio and Television 
Executives Society cor- 
dially invites you to a spe- 
cial benefit performance 
of the sure fire hit musical 

DESTRY RIDES 
AGAIN 

Starring Andy Griffith and 
Dolores Gray on Thurs- 
day evening, April 30. 
Proceeds go to support 
the many educational and 
service activities of the 

i; i ks. 

For your reservations 
write 

RTES 

Biltmorc Hotel 
New York 17, New York 



year; Fremantle now distributes 55 
half-hour series in 31 countries 
among which new territories include 
Poland and Brazil . . . Ziv's Bold 
Venture sold to markets in Mexico, 
Australia and England . . . ABC 
Films signed Meet McGraw to Aus- 
tralian stations and People's Choice 
to Japan . . . Sheldon Reynolds 
claims a one-slot price of $7,500 for 
Berlin sale of Berlin-produced pilot 
of Appointment With Fear. 

Domestic sales: Official Films" The 
Big Story sold to WNEW-TV, New 
York and WTTG-TV, Washington 
. . . Regis Films reports buys on cur- 
rent Crusader Rabbit series total $1,- 
450,000 with most recent pacts to 
WRCA-TV, New York; KRCA-TV, 
Los Angeles; WGAL-TV, Lancaster, 
and WTVD, Durham . . . ABC Films 
lists 16 new markets buying Anni- 
versary Package British feature films, 
plus the following sales on 26 Men: 
California Spray for KRON-TV, San 
Francisco; Rust-Oleum for \\ CkT. 
Miami and WDSU-TV, New Orleans; 
Purina Dealers, KTVO, Ottumvva: 
Thunder bird Carpets, KIVA-TV, 
Yuma: Sehomhurg Jewelers, WRBL- 
TV, Columbus, Ga., and to station 
KXII-TV, Ardmore . . . UAA re- 
ports feature film and cartoon sales 
to 18 stations. 

Programs: Bernard L. Schubert 
casting for Boy Pioneer . . . Mrs. 
Glenn Mann has formed a new radio- 
tv-film packaging house . . . Ted 
Lloyd has acquired broadcast and 
screen rights to Archie. 
Promotion: Commendation for 
CNP's Flight series have been re- 
ceived from U. S. Senator Barr\ 
Goldwater of Arizona . . . ABC Film> 
star Cleo of The People's Choice will 
appear on National Tuberculosis As- 
sociation posters this summer. 
#> 

Commercials: Sheldon \emeyer 

joins Depiclo Films as an executive 
producer . . . I l'\ proposals made 
to United Scenic Artists Local 829 
were rejected l»\ the union lasl week 
. . . Mitch Leigh, head ol Music 
Makers, earned a pei Eoi mance fee Eoi 
his special effects whistle in a I 'raise 
i ommercial sound hack thi ough 
K&E. 

StrictU personnel: Frederick Ja- 
cob! will head the radio press sec- 
tion "I the National Education Asso- 



ciation New York office . . . NT\ 
named Kurt Unger as European 
sales manager and Melvin J. Edel- 
stein as Latin American manager 
. . . Lawrence L. Wynn is national 
account executive for 1TC . . . Art 
Breecher named midwestern sales 
manager for Official Films . . . Leon 
Peck to post of N T\ assistant comp- 
troller . . . Mrs. Shirley van Sickle 
is ABC Films' new film traffic man- 
ager . . . Howard Kany appointed 
director of international business re- 
lations for CBS stations division. 



NETWORKS 



\\ hat might indicate that sports tele- 
casts tend to draw more people 
to a set than the average pro- 
gram is a study just completed in 
connection with the All Star Golf 
Show on ABC T\ . 

Ybout 1,000 known viewers of the 
show were polled h\ postcard on the 
number of people who, as a rule, 
watch it w ith them. 

The return was 75' i and the an- 
swers came out to an average of 4.0 
viewers per set — as contrasted 
with a 2.3 average for all types 
of programs. 

Another study revealed that the' 
show gels an audience of around 75 
viewers per-country-clnh-per-Sat- 
urday. There are approximately 
5.000 such clubs in the L. S. 

All Star Golf has been renewed h» 
next season b\ Reynolds and Miller 
High Life. 



Other sports notes: 

Arrow Shirts (Lennen \ Newell' 
will sponsor the nine coast-to-coast 
live NC\\ football games \ia N1H 
TV this Fall, calling for the largest 
ad budget in \iiow s histor) . . 
Phillies Cigars i Wcrinen \ Schorr] 
has one-hall of the weekend natiotui 
telecasts of Major League Basehal 
\ia NBC TV. while Anhanser 
Bnsch (Gardner) has one-half of tlv 
games in the Midwest region; M 
tional Brewing (W. l'>. Doner) f<> 
one-half in the Southeast; and Gen« 
see Brewing (Marshalk & Pratt) 
one-quai tei in New ^ ork Stale. 

VBC. TVs accumulation of No. 
places per half-hour bet wee 
7:30-10:30 p.m. seven nights 
week continues on the upswinj 

Here's how these 12 half-hoi 



C6 



>l'U\M>li 



4 APRIL 195 



number of lii-t- rack up according 
t.. the first March Nielsen: 

M I \\ (IKK \l Mil M l%9 m \k« M I" ""' 

\i;<: f\ L8 :: 

CBS l\ 12 L8 

m l\ 12 L6 



Network t\ business: Harold F. 
Ritchie i K\ I I, foi pari icipations, be. 
ginning this week, on \l>< l\ - < oil 
./.)... The Nestle Co. I Br) an I [ous- 
ton i . Standard Brands I Bates ' and 
I'lir Dixie ( !o. i Hicks & < rin-i I, foi 
da\time -In «\\ - \ ia \\\C. I\. t < >t a I i n ^ 
S2 million in gross billings. 

Network radio business: Pepsi- 
Cola (K&E), !"i House Part?) and 
the "Impact" plan ami Iveddi-W ij> 

D'Arc) I, for Arthur Godfrey, both 
mi CBS . . . Five new advertisers ilii- 
week, foi VBC: Ben-Mont Papers, 
Inc.. Pepsi-Cola, Perkins Division of 
General Foods, I he Scholl Mfg. < \o, 
and I . N . Pharmacal Co., plus 52- 
Acck renewals In Midas, Inc. and 
Jral Roberts K\angelistic Vssocia- 

ion. 

Network affiliations: W KIN-TV, 
{ockford. III., to \BC T\ as a pri- 

ai\ affiliate . . . \\ K.ST. New (Castle. 

a.-Youni:sto\Mi, 0., to ABC Radio. 

Tliisa *n* data: The Peter Lind 

l,t\e> ueekdax 11:30-12:30 show 
eaves \IU' T\ in V.pril, to be re- 
ilacd In the Buddy Deane Shou 
noon-1 :00 p.m. i . Another newcomer 
mi \BC TV's daytime lineup: The 
,dle Storm Show, to debut L3 \piil. 
-:iil-.! p.m. . . . kudo: Dick Clark. 
d \B(' I \ '- Imerican Bandstand, 
\ill receixe the 12th annual award of 
he Philadelphia (iuild of Advertising 
den for "distinguished achievement 
n the t\ field." 10 April at the Drake 

lotel. 

Mrictly personnel: Harold I)a>. 

ained director of daytime sales for 
\i:< l\ ... Charles Steinberg, to 
p. in charge of information services 
•] I BS T\ . . Edward Bleir ... 
oins \IH' TV a- an account execu- 
te . . . Newell Schwin, to the new 
losition o| director, production sales 
oi CBS l\ - operations department 
. Robert Grebe, trade news edi- 
■I for ABC since 1955, moves to 
vR 27 \pril a- director of public 
elation-. 



RADIO STATIONS 



The Saturday Evening Posl ran 
in three installments this month 

an article BerieS based on the 

Westinghouse stations" iutobi- 
ograph) : \l\ Road to Ci ime. 

I he SI P ni iic i i tilled bis matei ial 
from the tape ol the five hour!) 
show- w hii h i an on the stations be- 
tween 23-27 March. 

No plugs for the competition: 

KDAY, Santa Monica, Cal., re- 
moved from their record schedules 
the '"77 Sunset Strip," "Maverick 

and "Theme From Peter (iunn" rec- 
ords, because, according to general 
manage] li\ Phillips: 

"The station i- taking the leader- 
ship in foiling clever tv promo- 
tion men who are seeking to use 
radio to build their own shows 
lip." 

He asked: "Whj should radio do- 
nate tens of thousands ol dollars ev- 
ii \ month to build up a competitive 
media?" 

Here's how a Houston station is 
set to prove that not all teen- 
agers are delinquent: 

k\\Z will devote a newscast a 
da) to a teen organization: Teen 
News Association. Teen reporters 
will air News li\ Teens For Teens, a 
rundown of the headlines from the 
high school campuses, to be followed 
1>\ genera] news. 

Ideas at work: 

• \ bit of Ireland: The five win- 
ners of \^ BZ. Bostons "I rip to 
Ireland'" contest returned from the 
land of the shamrocks last week after 
spending -i\ days touring Dublin, 
viewing the St. Patrick's l)a\ parade. 
the Kailwax (up Matches and South- 
ern Inland. I he "w In I would like 

to spend St. Patrick - I )a \ in Ire- 
land" contest drew some 1 1.000 en- 
tries. 

• WCIM). Cincinnati, ha- a new 
idea for it- newscasts: Having the 
people actualh involved in the news 
give brief taped report- or reactions. 

fliese arc aired along with the regu- 
lar newscasts. 

• Itadio alert- a hospital: \\k^. 
Oklahoma City, offering $25 weekrj 
for news tip-, wa- the first to receive 
a call about a plant accident. Before 



WHEELING 

37; TV 

MARKET 



•Television Mi 1/58 



One Station Sells Big 
Booming Ohio Valley 



NO. 11 IN A SERIES 

ALUMINUM 




Right In the heart of the prosperous 36- 
county WTRF-TV area is the massive 
aluminum rolling mill of the Olin Mathie- 
son Chemical Corporation at Hannibal, 
Ohio. It will reach full production this 
year with a yearly capacity of 120,000.000 
pounds of rolled aluminum products, such 
as aluminum plate, sheet and coils. The 
thousand employees are a vital statistic 
for alert advertisers in the WTRF-TV area 
where 2 million people have an annual 
spendable income of 2'/2 billion dollars, 
an area where WTRF-TV influences buyers 
in 425, 196 homes. 

For complete merchandising service and 
availabilities, call Bob Ferguson, VP 
and General Mgr., at CEdar 2-7777. 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Company 



w trf t v 

Wheeling 7, West Vo. 

316,000 watts |N|B][C[ "•*"•* «•••» 



►NSOR 



4 april 1959 



67 



airing the details, station called the 
city hospital to alert them about it. 

D.j. tensers: In a move to proinoii- 
its new d.j., Ed Reilly, WTRY, Al- 
bany-Schenectady-Troy ran a satura- 
tion teaser campaign on its own sta- 
tion, and it;* competitor, \\ PTR, say- 
ing "Reilly is coining*' . . . KIOA, 
Des Moines, is going western: That's 
the teaser campaign used by the sta- 
tion via spots and sandwich man 
walking the streets to highlight the 
coming of its new d.j., Lee Western. 

Business notes: A. H. Morse Co., 
Boston food brokers, for 10-minutes 
dailj of Priscilla Fortesque Showcase, 
via WEEI, Boston . . . Zesta Saltine 
Crackers, the first client to present 
stereo announcements on Carnival in 
Stereo, via WSB, Atlanta. 

Station purchases: The Rochester 
Broadcasting Co., licensees of 
WRVM, to the State Broadcasting 
Co., for $350,000, brokered by Allen 

Kander & Co WHTB, Talladega, 

Ala., to Radio Alabama, Inc. for 
$25,000, brokered by Paul H. Chap- 
man Co. 

Kudo: WPTR, Albany-Schenectady- 

Troy, awarded by the National Head- 
liner Club for public service by a 
local radio station. 

Station staffers: Lionel Bnxter, 

v.p. and managing director of WIBC, 
Philadelphia, named director of radio 
operations of Storer Broadcasting Co. 
. . . Don Keyes, in addition to v.p. 



in charge of national programing, 
elected assistant t<> the president of 
the McLendon Corp. . . . Phil No- 
Inn, promoted to program director 
for KALL, Salt Lake City . . . Rich- 
ard Fellows, to operations manager 
in charge of programing at WPDO, 
Jacksonville . . . Larry Cooper, to 
program director and Paul Doug- 
lnss, sales development manager at 
KMOX, St. Louis . . . William 
Schwartz, to program manager of 
KDKA, Pittsburgh... Roy 
Schwnrtz, to the additional post of 
program manager at WIBG, Phila- 
delphia. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



CBS TV Spot Sales has a new nid 
for buyers seeking some quick 
way to figure cumulative audi- 
ences. 

Based on average ratings for three 
CBS stations, the rep firm has pub- 
lished nighttime and daytime cume 
charts. 

The former shows one-and-four 
week cumes for one to eight Class 
"AAA-AA" spots. The latter shows 
similar cumes for three to 36 spots in 
Class "C" time. 

Set up to advise unci administer: 
H-R Tv, Inc., and H-R Reps, Inc.. 

have organized a management com- 
mittee to devote time to planning, 
extra services to stations and adver- 
tisers, administration and review. 
Elected to the committee: Frank 



Headley, president; Frank Pellegrin, 
v.p.; Dwight Reed, v.p.; James Als- 
paugh. v.p.; John Bradley, midwest- 
em tv sales manager; Harold Lind- 
ley, v.p.; Hal Chase, San Francisco 
manager: and Avery Gibson, director 
of research. 

Appointment: WKMH, Detroit- ' 
Dearborn, to Edward Petry Co., ef- 
fective this week. 

Rep firms on the move: Broad- 
cast Time Sales, to new offices at The 
Penthouse. 509 .Madison Avenue, 
New York . . . Clarke Brown Co., to 
Suite 1507 Southland Center, Dallas. ! 

New personnel appointments at 
The Boiling Co.: G. Richard Swift, 
executive v.p. in charge of tv sales, to 
president of the tv division; Henry 
O'Neill, to New York sales manager 
for tv; G. William Boiling, III, to 
v.p. and assistant to the president, 
and president of the radio division; 
Lloyd Raskopf, to New York sales 
manager for radio. 

More about people on the move: 
Robert Hoffman, to director of 
marketing and research and Rodric 
Smith, to business manager of TvAR 
. . . Frank Beazley, to the Chicago 
office and Ralph Daniels to the San 
Francisco office as account executives 
for CBS Tv Spot Sales . . . Lon 
Nelles, account executive in the Chi- 
cago office of Harrington. Ri^hter & ' 
Parsons, Inc. . . . William Kelley 
and Nicholas Madonna, to the Ne« 
York office as account executives for 
Am Radio Sales . . . John Drago-, 



WROC-TV 



Selling the Rochester, JVexv York, market 



greater coverage in the thriving 13-county market surrounding Rochester, N. Y., is just one important reason 
why more and more advertisers select WROC-TV. Nielsen (NCS -3. Spring 1958) shows WROC-TV continues to 
provide advertisers with considerably greater coverage of this two-channel market than its competitor... 

WROC-TV COVERAGE ADVANTAGE 

Total Homes Reached Monthly +26.5% Daytime— Viewer Homes Daily +38.8% 

Total Homes Reached Once-a-week +20.8% Nighttime— Viewer Homes Daily +28.8% 

For further information about availabilities on WROC-TV, call Peters. Griffin. Woodward. 



mier. 


to account e 


xecu 


live i 


i the 


Chicago office "f Ve 


nard 


. Itinl 


ml & 


McConnell, Inc. . . . 


K. 


Allan 


Jar- 


rett. 


to the New ^ 


ork 


t\ Btl 


.IT ,,f 


PGW. 










TV STATIONS 



The KCC wants, and >*ill proba- 
:>ly get. an Appeal Courts green 
ight i<> begin hearings on wheth- 
er improper pressures were ap- 
> I ■«-! I on then-FCC Commissioner 
\i( li.uil A. Mark in the Orlando, 

haiinel 9 ease. 

Meanw hile the KCC lias dela\ ed for 

month oral arguments on special 
learing examiner lloraee Stern's ini- 
ial decision in the Miami Channel 10 
Me, .mil the record has heen closed 
■II the re-hearing ol the Boston Chan- 
el "i contest. 

: The Miami Channel ](• dela\ was 
equested by the court which is to 

\ Mark and Thunnan Whiteside on 

rihery and conspiracy charges, so 
lat the trial cannot he affected by 
,ie FCC proceeding. 

(See Washington Week, page -~>7. 
ir other Capital developments. 1 

'imes Square comes to Ft. 
Payne: WANE-AM & TV dedi- 
ited. last week, its news "telesign" 
t a ceremony featuring CMS nm- 
i-ter Douglas Edwards. The sign is 
te -'(ond in the country to be op- 
ated h\ a station — the other being 
ie CBS one in limes Square. 

leas at work: 

• WSM-TV. Nashville, hum, lied 
heavy barrage of promotional spots 
l its sister radio station and on 21 
idio stations in the surrounding 
ea to hypo interest in its new tv 
wer. The campaign, to sell the sta- 
in's more powerful signal and 
;arer picture, was kicked off with 

combination of spots over W SM 
id ads in local papers, followed up 
saturation spots on other stations 
to total 1.680 oxer two weeks. 

• The $20,000 idea is now bearing 
jit: Last year, WKRC-TY. Cin- 
lati. held opera auditions and sent 
:ht winners to Italy for lessons, un- 
r a "rant from Radio Cincinnati, 
e. One of them. Roald Beitan. has 
<t heen signed h\ the Metropolitan 

ra Co. So tlii- year, the IT,') 
pons for a similar enterprise is 
ing off to an enthusiastic start. 



• W ith their compliments: KET\ : 
Omaha, ia offering viewers again this 
sen an appreciation gifl a packet 
of gianl dahlia-flowered mixed-color 
zinnia seeds free, with tlii- note at- 
tached: "For your loyal viewing, here 
i- a summei Rower from us. 

Thisa 'n' data: WI.W -I). Dayton, 
marking it^ LOth anniversary this 
month . . . A. II. Christensen, ad- 
vertising and sales promotion man- 
ager for KI'IY San Francisco, the 
u inner in \K< T\ 's ""' rpei ation Da\ - 
break" promotion contest . . . Busi- 
ness note: Serta Mattress Co. (Reai b, 
McClinton & Pershall), for weekly 10 
p.m. newscast on WNBQ-TV, Chi- 
cago. 

Add random notes: 
KOCO-TV, Oklahoma City played 
host to some 300 tv technicians, dis- 
tributors and their families when they 
opened the doors of its Tv City for 
the Technicians Tv Fair last week . . . 
Another open house: At WCSH-AM 
& TV, for 200 guests, to celebate 
completion of renovations . . . Anni- 
versarv note: KFBB-TV, Great 
Falls. Mont., marking its fifth year 
this week with a special live telecast 
featuring salutes hy Congressional 
members, network personalities and 
public officials. 

Kudos: WSOC-TV, awarded the 
Allstate Safetv Crusade certificate of 
commendation . . . KMOX-TV, St. 
Louis, presented with the March of 
Dimes award for its Ui-hour telethon 
. . . WBRC-TY, Birmingham, cited 
with the Department of Arm) Ward 
for its work in "fostering better un- 
derstanding of the I . S. Army role in 
our national security." 

Strietly personnel: Lawrence Ca- 
rino, appointed acting manager of 
WWL-TV, New Orleans, during gen- 
eral manager Howard Summen die's 
leave of absence . . . Ted Kiclie- 
son. named national sales manager 
for KBFM-VM & TV, Spokane .'. . 
Jim Osborn. sales manager of 
W\l\. Milwaukee i which goes dark 
this week), rejoins WCBS-TV, New 
York as salesman . . . Sterling 
V^ right, to production manager and 
assistant program director oi WSOC- 
TV, Charlotte. \. C Jaek Dan- 
iels, to account executive l"r W \BC- 

T\ . New ^ elk. ^ 



Hoodoo Ski Aria in Oregon 



Nearly J/£ of Oregon's 
buying families watch 

KVAL-TV 

KPIC-TV 



The only clear-picture in the 
Eugene - Springfield - Roseburg 
market is on KVAL-KPIC. One 
order to your Hollingbery man 
or Art Moore and Associates 
( Portland-Seattle i covers both 
stations. 



KVAL-TV fogene 
NBC Affiliate Channel 



E 



KPIC-TV Roseburg • Channel 4 

Sotallile 




ONE BIG MARKET 
TWO BIG CITIES 
OMAHA-LINCOLN 
COVERED BY ONE 

BIG STATION: 

CHANNEL THREE 
ARB PROVES IT 
ASK PETRY ABOUT 



)NSOR 



4 April 1959 



69 




says Tom Garten, Sales Vice Pres. 

WSAZ-TV 

HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

How do you program a show to be 
best in its time slot? WSAZ-TV 
answers that with the Spinach 
Playhouse. The results they get 
with POPEYE and WARNER 
BROS. Cartoons are "fabulous", 
according to Sales V. P. Tom Garten . 
"Our Spinach Playhouse out- 
pulls both competitors in two 
time slots. We get ARB ratings 
like 29.7 vs. 7 5.0 and 8.0. Only 
recently our M.C. offered club 
cards and pulled 7,000 re- 
quests in just over 2 weeks.'' 

And WSAZ-TV finds that as high 
as 38% of the Spinach Playhouse 
audience are adults! No wonder all 
types of sponsors are enthusiastic 
about POPEYE and WARNER 
BROS. Cartoons. They build and 
hold program loyalty that quickly 
becomes product loyalty. 

Give your station a best-in-its-slot 
program with POPEYE and 
WARNER BROS. Cartoons. It's 
a sure-fire way to snag sponsors 
and keep them. 

I I I 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 

NEW YORK, 345 Madison Ave., MUrray Hill 6-2323 
CHICAGO, 75 E. Wacker Dr., DEarborn 2-2030 
DALLAS, 1511 Bryan St., Riverside 7-8553 
LOS ANGELES, 91 10 Sunset Blvd., CRestview 6-5886 



Tv and radio J 
NEWSMAKERS 



Richard C. Butler joins Lever Bros, this 
week as broadcast media manager. He i» 
presently an account executive with A. C. 
Nielsen Co., handling networks, advertis- 
ers and agencies. Butler has been with 
Nielsen since 1917, starting as an analyst 
^^^"^^P^t in the research firm's broadcast division. 

^^ tlS)^ ^ e obtained that position shortlx alter 

graduation from Dartmouth College. Also ji 
appointed: Joseph W. Daly, to assistant broadcast media manager. i| 
Daly has been with the Lever Bros. Co. since 1952, as a media buyer. J 




Thomas McDermort, v.p. in charge of 
radio and tv programing, and a member 
of the board of Benton \ Bowles, has been 
elected a senior v.p. He joined the agency 
in 1942, working in the radio department 
until the advent of tv. In 1948 he became 
production supervisor, and a year later, as- 
sistant to the director of tv and radio. 
McDermott was elected v.p. in charge of 

radio and tv programing in 1953, and became a member of the boar 
in 1958. He has bis B.A. and Masters decree from Manhattan Colled 






' 




clud 
fielc 



es WWLP-TV, 

. Mass.-Keene. 



James H. Ferguson, Jr., has been elected 
v.p. of sales for the Springfield Tv Broad' 
casting Corp. He previously was genei 
sales manager for the Massachusetts mm 
pany. Ferguson joined the group in 1953 
w ith the inception of WW LP. Prior to this, 
he was associated with several New Englatj 
radio stations. In his present position, 
Ferguson's over-all sales responsibility 
Springfield; WELP-TV, Brattleboro, Yt.-fi.ee 
N. II. and WWOR-TV, Worcester, Mass 






William C. Hunefeld, Jr., has been 

named manager of the Los \ngeles ollice of 

T\ Advertising Reps, [nc. He i> currentl] 

a sales account executive for \\ l'>(. - kl'IV 

San Francisco. Hunefeld is a native ol 

L. \. and an honor graduate of the College 

of the Pacific. He entered broadcasting in 

l'H7 ,i- a salesman Eoi kl.Y Oakland, He 

joined KSFO, San Francisco, as a salesman 

in 1952, and moved to KI'IX in IT).".. Hunefeld begin 

duties immediatelj with the establishment of compan) s 




. hi- 
LA. 



T\ AR 

ollice. 



7(i 



SPONSOR 



I M'KIL 1959 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA 



(AND WESTERN NEVADA) 




KOH O RENO 

KFBK ° Sacramento 

KBEE ° MODESTO 
KMJ O RESNO 



\ 



KERN ° BAKERSFIEIO 




Beeline radio covers 3 of the top farm income counties in the 

nation, including Fresno County, the national leader. If you're 

interested in cotton-picking, turkey-plucking counties, Fresno 

is number two in both. For an added fillip, there's Stanislaus 

County, number one in peaches, number two in dairy. 

Agriculture is a big business — and a very profitable 
one. Dip into this rich market with a message on Beeline 
radio. 

Purchased together, Beeline stations give you more 
radio homes than any combination of competitors . . . 
at by far the lowest cost per thousand. 

(SR&D & Nielsen) ., . 

flAeCAatcUAj Sf^cuiccLsUAA^ C^nupouM 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




Cotton combine 
harvests cotton 
the Fresno area 



I )NSOR 



■i APRIL 1959 



71 



SPONSOR 



Two different selling needs 

Out of all the meetings, speeches, panel discussions and 
corridor conversations at the NAB Convention one fact 
emerged very clearly; the two branches of the air media are 
laced today with two entirely different types of sales problems. 

Keynoter Robert W. Sarnoff outlined tv's major need as 
that of selling the public on the functions and services per- 
formed by tv. His proposals along these lines have been 
referred for further action to a special nine-man committee, 
headed by Corinthian pres. C. Wrede Petersmeyer. 

On the other hand it was clear to most Chicago observers 
that radio's real sales problem lies not with the general public 
but with those advertisers and agencies whose enthusiasm 
for the medium has dimmed in recent months. 

The sharp contrast between tv's need for building public 
confidence and appreciation and radio's need for boosting 
its reputation among those who pay the bills deserves serious 
consideration by all station and network operators. 

The two media cannot be approached in the same way or 
promoted with similar techniques. 

Needed: a stronger radio effort 

We wholeheartedly endorse the Sarnoff proposals for in- 
creasing tv's prestige, but we are unhappy to realize that no 
comparable radio plan was advanced at Chicago. 

Radio, too, needs a program of industry-wide promotion, 
aimed specifically and directly at its point of greatest weak- 
ness — its time sales to advertisers. 

I)e-|>ite the energetic efforts of RAB, SRA, the networks 
and leading representative firms, a look at radio's 1958 bill- 
ings in all classifications — network, spot, and local — shows 
clearly that present industry programs are inadequate. 

This is a fact which radio men must iaee honestl) and 
boldly. More must be done for radio than i- being done toda\ . 



this we fight for: / solid, fact-based 

inunction arnon^ national advertisers that radio 
has a place in the tmeriean home which neither 
Ir nor an | other medium can usurp or fill. 




10-SECOND SPOTS 

Life- must-go on dept. From an AP 
dispatch: "Long Beach, Cal. — Mrs. 
Virginia Smith delivered her own 
baby without help while watching 
television from a couch in her living- 
room. 'It was a good movie and I 
didn't want to turn it off,' Mrs. 
Smith, 38, explained today. . . ." 
Guess that answers the tv critics! 

Castle in the air: Imagine a rodeo 
on video with stereo radio for the 
audio! — Charles V. Mathis. 

Semantics: Start of a promotional 
letter from Terrytoons — 
"To me, rock is something that 
breaks the lawnmower blades. To my 
offspring, it's the onlx way to dance." 
To us, it's to pour scotch on. 

Banned: WKAP, Allentown, Pa., 
which had been playing a disk titled, 
"Leadfoot" (a parody song on speed 
and reckless driving I was asked by a 
local hot rod club to "cut it out." 
No hot foot for the hot rodders. 

Blue and grey: From an RAB re- 
lease — "To dramatize the Civil War 
theme of the presentation. Mr. Swee- 
ney appeared on the platform at one 
point wearing the uniform of a Fnion 
Army general while RAB Vice Presi- 
dent John F. Hardesty donned the 
uniform of a Confederate general." 
Careful! Don't burn Atlanta. 

Cumulative: When a third child was 
born to the Chris Christensens (he's 
with WJZ, WBC outlet in Baltimore) 
the birth announcement took the 
form of a ratings report listing one 
boy affiliate. KIP, and two girl affils, 
KANDY and KRIS. 

Misunderstanding: A teen-age iiirl 
in the studio audience to Rate The 
Record on WNTA-TV, New York, 
wanted to know after tv theme ) an- 
cey Derringer was sung — who the 
girl in the son- realh was. Nancy 
who? 

Add mottoes: \ couple more quota 

for t In >>c bare olfice walls — 

"If the solution is obvious, we'll find 

another way." 

"I never remember names, but I al- 

wax s forget faces." 



Heading: From V. ). Times 
G.I.'s to Be Spared T\ Ads. 
Stop pampering the Army! 






72 



SPONSOR • 4 APRIL 1959 




"Last time I ever try my hand in 
Kentucky without WAVE-TV 

The helpingest hand in advertising in Kentucky and 
Southern Indiana . . . that's us. The more you compare 
balanced programming, audience ratings, coverage, cost- 
per-thousand, or trustworthy operation, the more you'll 
prefer WAVE- TV. 
.V. Jack Paar gave us his blessing. 



}} 



w i " ■■-' ' 






WAVE -TV 

CHANNEL 3 • Maximum Power 
LOUISVILLE 

NBC SPOT SALES, Exclusive National Representatives 








INTO THE 

KANSAS CITY "GOLDMINE 
for '59! 

KMBC-TV 

CHANNEL 9 

LETS YOU DIG THIS.J 



America's 17th Market! 

1,055,000 people in Metropolitan Area! 

2 Billion, 49 Million DOLLARS effective buying income 

1 Billion, 400 Million DOLLARS annual retail sales! i 

"Third among all cities in America enjoying prosperou 
business conditions . . . the largest city showing outstanc 
ing gains over a year ago." 

(Forbes Business and Finance Magazine, December 1958) 



Strike *\th KMBC-TV ■ 

Most Popular and Most Powerful station — 
316,000 watts horn "tall town". 

i Reaches 31,1 12 more homes in metropolitan Kansas City 
with Class \ coverage than nearest competitor! 
Leads in program popularity . . . 

front 3 p.m. to 10 p.m., KMBC 1\ leads l>\ 9 .7' , over M, 
nearest competitor, 17. -' , ovei the third station' 

VRB metro-area studj las., 1959 Mon thru hi 
from 3 p.m. to p.m.. KMBC IV leads l>\ 9.6<^ ovel 
nearesl competitor, 10.6% over the third station! 

\ ii Im ii repot i. I cli.. 1959 Mon. thru In 
on Sunday, K\I1U l\ lead in share <>l audience in -i 



ol the 2 1 quartet hours betwei n 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.! 
i Nielsen report, I eb , 19 i9 

# Five ol the top ten TV shows in Kansas Cit\ are on 

KMBC-TV Nielsen, Feb., 1959 






7 / < KM BC"TV 



Kansas City's Most Popular and Most Powerful TV Station 



DON DAVIS, President 
JOHN SCHILLING. Eiecutive Vil 
GEORGE HIGGINS, Vice Pres. ll 
MORI GREINER. Manager of Tf I 



and in Radio, it's KMBC <U Kansas City — KFRM U% the State of Kansas 



11 APRIL 1»59 
40< a copy • SS ■ yaar 



* 



PONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



Successful trip . . . 




RECEIVED 

APR 1 195 

NBC GENERAL LIBRARY 



you 

can 
tell 



/ 



RADIO INDUSTRY 
DESERVES A 
SPANKING' 



where there's 
a Storz Station 
there's audience 



today's 

Radio for 

today's selling 

Todd Storz. President 
Home Office: Omaha 

WOGV. WHS. K0M4, WQAM 
'forestnted by John Blair I Co. 



So saj - 
keting \ 
the-recoi 

the state 


a leading niar- 
.p. in an off- 
(1 inten ieH on 
of radio today 


Page 31 







AMST: what the 
allocations fight 
means to sponsors 

Page 36 

How airtight 
planning can cut 
cost of tv tape 

Page 42 

TV basics: more 
one-hour shows on 
nighttime tv lists 

Page 45 





, Fact #1: Pulse shows more people 
listen to WTOP in the 20 counties which 
make up the Greater Washington 
area than any other radio station. Fact #2: 
Independent survey reveals more than 
76% of WTOP listeners are in income groups 
over $6,000 per year. Conclusion : in 
Washington, the important station is . . . 



WASHINGTON, D. C 

An Affiliate of the CBS Radio Network 
Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



operated by the Washington post broadcast division: 

WTOP Radio. Washington. DC. * WTOP-TV. Channel 9. Washington. D .C. • WJXT. Channel 4. Jacksonville H 




St. George made things happen in Macedonia . . . and 




WPEN 

RADIO 
MAKES 
THINGS 
HAPPEN 
IN 
PHILADELPHIA 

WPEN is the only radio station in Philadelphia 
broadcasting up-to-the-minute traffic re- 
ports directly from our own helicopter. These 
authoritative, on-the-spot reports of traffic 
conditions are broadcast by Philadelphia 
Police Department traffic experts. In Public 
Interest— and in Sales — WPEN Makes Things 
Happen In Philadelphia. 

WPEN 



Represented nationally by 
GILL— PERNA 



m„,. v„,i, ru;^-» i „,. a. 



D~-t~„ n.i..,i 



i Vol. 13, Vo. 15 • 11 April 1959 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



Radio deserves a spanking 

3X ^ n unexpurgated, off-the-record interview with a prominent marketing v.p. 
who feels that the radio industr) has been throwing away its birthright 



Necco sweetens sales with spot tv mix 

34 Sales rise foi \ih England Confectioner) Co.'s lmrs and boxed candy as 
it puts 90$ of SI million ad budget into spot tv in 28 major markets 



What the allocations fight means to sponsors 

36 A primer on video's growth is contained in the FCC testimony given by 
Maximum Service Telecasters, key defender- ol t\ spectrum against raids 



Andrea uses radio to sell quality market 

38 Radio's broad range from the highbrow to average man — enables elec- 
tronics manufacturer to reach market that will buy high-priced gear 



What's the answer to spot's paperwork jungle? 

40 ' >ar| luo ol ,i two-part series that explores feelings of paper-snarled 
admen and their suggestion* to indu-tr) for fewer spot complications 



How to cut video tape commercials costs 

42 BBDO gets Wr saving over live production b> taping 16 minutes of com- 
mercials in two da\s. Here's the- step-b\ -step acco-'iit of how it's done 



Season highlight: more hour shows 

45 Nielsen stud] of nighttime network n -how lengths tallies 95 one-hour 
shou- during a month in L959; 86 in L958. latest net tv Comparagraph 



sponsor asks: What constitutes a good man's show? 

62 With the male audience increasing in importance for main of today's 
advertisers, expert- examine the basic appeals for men in programing 



FEATURES 

1 ( ommercial ' mentar) 

78 I- il in v > ope 

24 19th and Madison 

74- News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker ol 1 1 1 . \\ eek 

74- Picture \\ rap I p 

80 Sponsoi Hears 

1 7 Sponsoi s ' ope 



96 Sponsor Speaks 

52 Spol Buys 

64 Telepulse 

96 I en-Second Spots 

2 2 I imebu) ei - ai \\ oi k 

94 l\ and Radio Newsmakers 

77 \\ ashington V eek 






Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMilltn 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Swen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 
Art Editor 

Mau^y Kurtz 
Production Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Visknlskki. Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiqqins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Dorris Bowers, Administrative Mqr. 

V P- Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Rov Meachum 

Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Peirv 

Sandra Lee Oncav Asst 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken. Office Mqr. 

Georqe Becker; Charles Eckert; Gilda 

Gomez; Priscilla Hoffman; Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



ESI 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circtt- 
l.ition and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th Si 
H9 & Madisonl New York 17, N. Y. Tek- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUpenor 7-9863 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham 
Fhonc: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 60*7 
Sunset Boulevard Phone: Hollywood 4-8089 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore II 
Md. Subscriptions: US S8 a year. Canada E 
other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a year 
Other Foreign Countries SI 1 per year. Singh 
copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all cor 
respondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y 
MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by SPON 
SOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid J 
Baltimore. Md. 

ell 959 Sponsor Publications Inc 



Now Your 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Can Get 
HIGHER VIEWING! 



Thanks to the fact that W'HO-TV has invested over 
?250,00O in top film packages* — and programs them 
n excellent time periods — you can buy one-minute 
participations, with FABULOUS ratings, at excep- 
tionally low cost! 

I WHO-TV particularly recommends these three ter- 
fic shows — all with vastly higher ratings than their 
mipetition, according to ARB for January 12 — 
ebruary 8, 1959: 



FAMILY THEATRE (12:00 NOON to 2 PM, MON. thru FRI.) 
Average ARB rating, Mon.-Fri. — 1 Week 4 Weeks 

WHO-TV 16.2 15.3 

ARB Cumulative Rating— 42.0% 

EARLY SHOW (4:30 PM to 6:05 PM, MON. thru FRI.) 
Average ARB rating, Mon.-Fri. — 
WHO-TV 23.1 20.4 

ARB Cumulative Rating— 47.9% 

LATE SHOW (10:30 PM to sign-off, MON. thru FRI.) 
Average ARB rating, Mon.-Fri. — 
WHO-TV 10.6 10.6 

ARB Cumulative Rating— 31.7% 

PGW has all the dope, including the list of top- 
ight advertisers who are now using these spectacular 
ferings. Make a note to ask vour Colonel! 

IGM — -Warner Bros. — STA "champagne" — ABC "Galaxy 
r—STA "Rocket 86"— STA "Big^ 50"— Flamingo 92 
'esterns — Popeye — Bugs Bunny — Betty Boop — etc. 



WHO-TV is part of 

Central Broadcasting Company, 

which also owns and operates 

WHO Radio. Des Moines 

WOC-TV, Davenport 



WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV* \ 

HO -TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-T 
W .O-T 
W -IO-T 
'V HO -TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
MO-T 
>-TV 
&-TV 
W!SO-TV 
V\^)-TV 
WT^TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 

WHO-TV 







Channel 13 • Des Moines 



41p 



Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., 
Sational Representatives 



jjfl 



Affiliate 



•ONSOR 



11 VI'KIL 1959 




...and he had a microphone." Ray Newby (right) in 1959 recalls how he, at the age of 16 
and Charles D. Herrold founded a radio station in San Jose, California fifty years ago. Credit 
to Herrold as the originator of broadcasting is many years overdue. While other experiment- 
ers were using their wireless equipment for point-to-point communication, Herrold thought of 
radio as an entertainment medium for a mass audience. Mr. Newby recounts, "Folks with 
crystal sets in San Jose and for miles around at first were amazed to hear voices instead 
of code. We'd go on Wednesday evenings and broadcast voice and music for a half hour. And 
sometimes we could run longer if the microphone and everything didn't get too hot." 

That 15-watt station which Herrold started back in 1909 has continued, through KQW, to the 
present 50,000 watt KCBS in San Francisco. And, Herrold's dream to "broadcast" to a mass 




'I bought a one in 



h coil... 




audience has become a striking reality. Today, KCBS is 
heard by eight out of ten Northern California families 
each week. 

11909 The first radio broadcasting station in the world. 
1959 The Bay Area's first station in the world of entertain- 
Iment. 

Historical data from "Broadcasting's Golden Anniversary" by 
Gordon Greb, Assistant Professor, San Jose State College and 
published in the Journal of Broadcasting University of South- 
ern California. Winter Edition, 1958-59. Reprints on request, i 





D 

< 
DC 



r 



50 YEARS OF BROADCASTING 



1909 
1959 






IN SOUTH GEORGIA 

AND 

NORTHWEST FLORIDA . . . 

A NEW 
MARKET 

since Alar. 19th! 

WALB-TV's new 

1,000 FOOT* 

TOWER 

has almost doubled 

the effective WALB-TV 

market in this area ! 



i Tallest in South Ceorgia 
and North Florida I 



• GRADE B POPULATION 
NOW IS: 



700,000 



• GRADE B TV HOMES 
NOW ARE: 



126,200 



Write for 

new coverage map! 

ALBANY, CA. CHANNEL 10 



WALB-TV 




Raymond E. Carow. General Manager 

Represented nationally by 

Venard. Rintoul & McConncll, Inc 

In the South by James S. Aycrs Co. 

One Rate Card 






NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



If J- W alter Thompson Agency had a fatted calf, then last 
Friday was the day for veal chops. After 10 years, the 
prodigal returned. Standard Brands'' Chase & Sanborn 
coffee, a pioneer sponsor of big variety shows in both tt 
and radio, came back to J\f T after a decade with Compton. 



The newsmaker: In his 30 \ears with JWT. Norman H. 
Strouse proved his talents in many areas — research, planning, art, 
copy and finance. Last week he demonstrated a new one — retrieving 
a strajed account. 

The Chase & Sanborn coffee account strayed awa) in 1949, six 
years before Strouse became JWT s president. Now it returns, a 
fatter, sleeker account billing between $6.5 and $8 million, and in- 
cludes not only the original Chase & Sanborn regular coffee but a 
full-grown offspring — instant cof- 
fee. When the account first left 
JWT for Compton. the instant cof- 
fee was an infant business, practi- 
cally in the development stage with 
almost all sales to the Armed 
Forces for ration kits. By today, 
instant brews have all but revolu- 
tionized the coffee business, and 
television was the force behind 
that revolution. 

Indeed admen look upon the 
shift back to JWT as still more 
evidence of tv's impact. I nder 
Strouse. the s.'>()0 million agenc\ of JWT lias had remarkable suc- 
cess in scoring with network t\ shows. Vdmen expect that the pres- 
entations which brought the account back to the fold certainh in- 
clude a bold thrust into nighttime network t\. 

That Chase \ Sanborn coffee has been out ol nighttime network 
for years seems incredible, lor here was an account that pioneered 
both radio and t\ network in its first alliance with JWT. It intro- 
duced to net radio the big varietx show concept. was the first big 

network \ariet\ show spons n l\ hack in I'M 6. In net radios 

hey-day, Hud\ Vallee, Eddie Cantor, Hob Burns. Rubinoff and his 
violin, Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy were synonymous with 
Chase & Sanborn or Standard Brands: the eompanx was the first to 

tie | lucl identit) to big Mar name- (no! to characters such as 

Pepsodent's Amos ami \ml\ I. In the same era. one of the first big 
marketing moves l>\ foods was introduced In J\\ I wilh the Chase 
\ Sanborn ""dated coffee. 

Ii was a happ) firsl union between J\\ I and the coffee account; 
air media watches for bis things from the Strouse reconciliation. ^ 




\ hi man If. Strom 



SPONSOR 



1 1 \i-kii. 1959 



potters 
Tobacco Co. 
eaters 



r It 

i Grocers Co. 
i Retailers Assn. 
erguson 
Louis 
Chewing Gum 
f's Super Mkts. 
ker Pizza 
ig Co. 
evrolet Co. 
> Cream 
rop. Assn. 
yer< r 



uoodyear service Mores 

Gordon Potato Chips 

Great A & P Tea 

Greater St. Louis Automotive Ass'n 

Griffin Shoe Polish 

Grove Laboratories 

Robert Hall, Inc. 

Hamilton Dryers 

Hardy Salt Company 

Henri's Food Products 

Herbert Tnreyton Cio"'- 

Hess & ChI"- 






V> 



<te # 



■t 









miarown morors 
MGM Pictures 
Milnot 

Minipoo Shampoo (Block Drug) 
Missouri Committee for 
Missouri State Fair 
Missouri Resources & Devel 
Commission 

Mogen David Wine 
John Morrell Meats 
Morton Mfg. (Chapstick) 
Motion Picture Theatre 
Owners of America 
Mounds — Candy Bars 
The Mulligan Company 
Mum Deodorant 
unicipal Opera Ass'n 
thur Murra 
*ual Secur 
T-Fine Pu 




. Scrui 

the 
Nati 
iccounts 



wevion s iiiKen nei 
Rold Gold Pretzels 
Roosevelt Federal Savings & loc 
Royal Typewriters 
Schenberg's Markets 



>any 



Scruggs Vandervoort & Barney 
st Dairy 
Roebuck 
H Green Stamps 
ell Oil Company 

erson Hotels 




ompany 










^*2 



%am 



\& 



$$& 



\w 



uga 
Pictu 1 
y Fed 

Foods 
| nical Co 1 
lotocopy 
argarine 
m i Shoppin 
/ax Paper 
[ Gasoline 
alers Ass'n 
ilty Company 

St. Louis Ass 

Laboratories, I 

rmelon Stand 

oration 

Park Jockey Clu 
rewing Company 
arr Company 
jme Savings & Loan 
Tire & Rubber Co. 

rs Assn. 
tevrolet 

surance Company 
lilts. Inc. 












* 



m 






W0 1 



ei\ 




Bus Service — Greyhounc 

bon Co. — 
oM Anti-Freeze) 
ood Stores 
•- Cigarettes 

& 'issues (Marathon Corp.) 
Chopping Center 
| °roducts 
of fee 
ngton Pear Bureau 

ttes (American Tobacco) 
ettes 

s 



I 



\S^ 



% \&\ 



0^ 



tf 



\tf 



% 



ti* 



)NS 









KB°* 



HE 



»> 



la 



|A" 




s 



V0& 



ion 
e Cigarettes 
ysol 

McCall's Magazine 
McMahon Pontiac Company 
Manor House Coffee 
Mars Oil Company 
Metro Motors — Dodge & Plymouth 



!pps Super Markets 
Raskas Dairy 
R-F Spaghetti 
Rayco Auto Seat Covers 
Ray Risman Dodge 
Reader's Digest 
R. B. Rice Sausage 
R.C.A. Victor 
R. C. Cola 
R. J. Reynolds 



Statler Hotel 

Sterling Silversmiths Guild of Ai 

Stix, Baer & Fuller 

St. Louis Blue Shield Plan 

St. Louis Federal Savings & Loa 

St. Louis Motors, Inc. 

St. Louis Plymouth Dealers 

St. Louis Public Service Co. 

Studebaker 

Tea Council 

Teamsters Joint Council #688 

Texaco 

T.V. Guide 

Ting 

Tippy Toy, Inc. 

Ted's Motors 

Union Electric Company 

United Fruit Company 

Vicks Chemical Company 

Vornado 

Vess Bottling Company 

Visinet Mills 

Vanish 

Charles E. Vatterott Company 

Von Der Ahe Lines 

Weil Clothing Company 

Winstons 

Worth Stores 

Wabash Railroad 

Wrigley Gum 

Zang Mercury 

Zephyr Gasoline 



VSMAKER STATION OF THE WEEK 




In tempo with the times 



BUY Radio when you buy media WIL 

BUY Balaban when you buy radio „_ _„ _ __ _ 

.,„„„ K f ox THE BALABAN STATIONS 

BUY WIL when you buy St. Louis 0al " 

WRIT John F Box. Jr . Managing Director 

and you BUY the people who BUY Whnut M Sold Nationally by Robert E East--- 



A : RATFS FOR I IKF RFRVIHFR 







Caught in the Act I 



\ ■ — i W 



&&&»'&&(£ 







iffi&&i? 



•*.':■<•: 






Thomas Mitchell "And He's Great As 

GLENCANNON 

Almost one billion reader Impressions 
via GLENCANNON stories In The 
Saturday Evening Post punctuate the 
powerful plus of pre-acceptance 
you get with this high-spirited, high 
seas half 'hour comedy series. You're 
In great company, too, because 
advertisers such as OLYMPIA BEER 
In 47 West Coast markets, as 
well as BLUE PLATE FOODS, HOLSUM 
BAKERIES and FISHER FOODS 
SUPERMARKETS are already cashing 
In on the fact that situation comedy 
such as GLENCANNON sets up a 
uniquely ideal commercial climate. 
It's a conclusive fact which Schwerin 
Research stated in no uncertain 
terms in a recent issue of Television 
Magazine. And here's another fact: 
Academy Award winner, "Tony" 
Award winner, "Emmy" Award winner, 
THOMAS MITCHELL is on deck to 
sell for you personally. That's right" 
THOMAS MITCHELL is all set to 
charm sales resistance out of existence 
for you. Want to catch him in the act? 
Just say the good word: GLENCANNON. 
For full details, phone, wire, write 

NTA Program Sales 

A Division of Natlonml Telefilm Associates, Inc., 

Coliseum Tower, #0 Columbus Circle, New York 19, W 2-7300 




Scoop! KBIG now broadcasts 
local news-in-the-rnaking as 
it happens . . . direct from the 
Los Angeles Herald-Express, 
the West's largest evening 
newspaper. Twice each hour 
top reporters join award- 
winning KBIG newscasters to 
broadcast the top stories 
that make the day's headlines. 
AP, UPI, City News Service, 
Dow-Jones and "Sigalert" 
make KBIG news complete. 
But the best news is that KBIG 
reaches 91% adult listeners 
in 234 Southern California 
markets ... for 71% less than 
other stations with 
comparable coverage. 



by John E. McMillin 



RED HOT 

NEWS TEAM 



X* 



HEMDwfiPRfSS 



We 



tmttnd 



ecurities 

©HA** f%*> 




JOHN POOLE 
BROADCASTING CO., INC. 

6540 Sunset Blvd. 
Los Angeles 28, Calif. 
HOllywood 3-3205 



MM POOL! il»OAOCAJTlNO CO , IMC. 






Ml 







Commercial 
commentary 



How those print boys do talk 

Whenever I get gloomy and discouraged about 
the state of tv and radio commercials, all I need 
to cheer me up is to look at the promotional 
efforts of the print media boys. 

For instance, this issue of sponsor carries 
I facing page 52 1 an extraordinary eight-page, 
four-color ad for the Saturday Evening Post. 

1 think it's fine that the Post feels that the 
hest \\a\ to promote magazines is to take space in a publication ad- 
dressed to radio and tv sponsors. And I know that many editors 
believe the first rule of publishing is "never speak ill of the dead — or 
your own advertisers." 

But at the risk of seeming ill-mannered and inhospitable to Ben 
Franklin's august weekly. I'd like to point out a few sillinesses in the 
Saturday Evening Post's '"apples and oranges" ad. 

Says the Post, "Now you can compare magazine ad pages with tv 
commercials . The new . . . study of Ad Page Exposure — conducted 
by Alfred Politz — actuallv measures the number of exposures to 
your ad page, gives you the first valid cost comparison of magazine 
and tv advertising exposure." 

A staggering achievement, if true. Comparable in fact to climb- 
ing Everest, splitting the atom, or inventing the wheel. But let's see 
how the Post, in its boyish pride, violates even the first principles of 
high school logic, in order to make such a claim. 

Wink-type research and the numbers racket 

The Politz Study apparent!) showed that "20 million times each 
issue someone turns to your ad page in the Post." Each of these 
page-turnings the Post calls an "advertising exposure." Well maybe. 

To me there's something essentiallj goof) about research thai sen 
out to measure page-turnings. That's not merel) estimating the num- 
ber of angels on the head of a pin bul the shoe sizes of each multi- 
plied l>\ the average heartbeat per angel. 15ul let's leave that lie. 

What is reall) absurd is the use the Post makes of this esoteric 
statistic. The Post maintains thai each of these page-turnings can be 
compare:! on a cost basis with a one-minute net t\ commercial. 

This is just giddy, confused and somewhat adolescent thinking. 

TVs "costs per-1,000 per commercial minute" are figured on the 
basis of people (audience). "Page-openings" are figured on the 
reactions of people. If you want a fair comparison, you might 1 1 y 
to find out the number of times the average viewer looks awav and 
back to his set during a commercial. 

When you have this figure, multipl) it b) the total number of 
viewers and you mighl (maybe) have a total of t\ "ad exposures. 

Or look at ii another way. Tv's CPMPMs arc figured on the basis 
of time (one minute'- duration. 1 To compare page-openings with 



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1 vpril 1959 




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rich market area it serves: Albany — Sche- 
nectady — Troy, plus Northeastern New York 
and Western New England. We can back 
this up with a file of sales success stories — 
for details, contact your local Henry I. Chris- 
tal man or call WGY, Schenectady, N. Y. 

J2-] 

50,000 Watts • NBC Affiliate • 810 Kilocycles 
A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 



I 





"Sunny" 
Knows 



. 



Commercial commentary continued 



"Sunny" knows WSUN de- 
livers more radio homes, at 
the lowest cost per home of 
any station in the heart of 
Florida.* 



WSUN is programed for 
service . . . and for sales, 
and has been making friends 
in Florida for 31 years. 




W# U N - - 

Tampa W St. Petersburg 

National Rep: 

VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL 

Southeastern Rep: 

|AMES S AYRES 

•NCS 2 



12 






one-minute commercials you must divide that 29-million total 1>\ 
"average page-openings per minute." Otherwise, you'll find yourself 
saying that a wink length exposure (maybe 1/5 of a second) is com- 
parable to a 60-second spot. 

These are only a couple of the ways in which the Post is befuddling 
the issue with dubious ((inclusions from research. And. of course, 
in doing so. it exhibits the typical "numbers hunger" most print 
media feel today. Faced with the overwhelming tv radio set owner 
ship and audience figures the Post is only human when it tries tc 
multiply its own statistics. 

Prearhing is more fun than thinking 

1 have no such warm folksy feeling, however, about the more direct 
print attacks on the air media such as Comptons "Doing beats View- 
ing" campaign for a group of national magazines. 

Recently a friend of mine sent me a Newsweek double-page spread 
from this campaign and I was fascinated to trace the anti-tv argument. 

It goes like this: 1) tv viewing is fun: 2 I but doing is more fun 
than viewing. 3) For people with "adult interests" reading is the 
most rewarding form of doing. 4 1 Newsweek readers as "well in- 
formed exercisers of their own judgments" second this statement. 
5) Newsweek has some dandv "puzzle-clarifying, crisis-analyzing' 
articles. 6 1 That's why advertising messages in Vewsweek gain 
greater power and attention value. 7) And therefore, "every week 
trade a few hours of viewing for extra hours of reading. ^ ou'll like 
yourself better." 

Now I submit that this is pretty torturous reasoning. It starts 
out in left field, detours via the goal posts, skates in over the blue line 
and arches a high mashie pitch to the basket at home plate. 

By the time you're through, you're not sure what you re trying to 
prove; you don't even know what game you're playing. Beyond that, 
though, the "doing is more fun than viewing" bit strikes me as a 
peculiarly pious form of hypocrisy. 

It reminds me of those dreadfully dishonest, self-serving arguments 
which parents use on teen-age kids *"I know you love baseball but 
you'll feel better inside if you mow the lawn" or "Mary is a nice girl 
but you'll have more fun if you take your sister to the party." 

Says who? As long as the print boys find it more fun to preach 
>lickv sermons to the public, than to try to improve their product, I 
don't think that t\ has much to worry about. 

In m\ opinion it would be a great thing for advertising if the 
"War between the Media" exploded in a nasty, hair-pulling, eye- 
gouging Donny brook. 

I'm not one of those mild-eyed, melancholy peacemakers, dedi- 
cated to the cau>e of business togetherne--. who thinks that news- 
papers and magazines and l\ and radio should love each other and 
live together, in one great happy, antiseptic family. Hut if we're 
going to have a light, let's make it a good one. The print boys aren't 
even hall trying. Vnd besides, they're losing their sense of humor. 

I'm really worried about that Compton copywriter who wrote the 
"Doing \s. viewing" ad. He's so solemn and circumspect. Can you 
imagine sitting down and writing, in all seriousness, this deathless 
line: "For people with 'adult interests reading i- the most rewarding 
form of doing"? 

Not if you're under 50, son. Not il you re under 50. ^ 



SI'ONSOIi 



I ummi. I')")') 




Czech This If You Dig Kolaches 

(A True Story About Iowa Radio With a Sol^ol Finish) 



Once upon a receni smiling noon hour Smiling 
Dean Landfear, M.C. oi our Voice of Iowa smiling 
audience participation show, gave 5,000-watt voice 
to a lady. She told the folks to hurry on down to 
aw upcoming 15. ike Sale and grab kolaches. 
(This could have been messy hut the distal! bakers 
had the foresight to protect said kolaches with smil- 
ing wax paper.) 



When the prune and apricot auA cherry pits had 
cleared away $,240 kolaches were missing. 
('I lm was good because people paid good money 
for them, which is more than we can s.i\ for the 
commercial.) 

Proceeds went to the local Sokol (a Czech gym- 
nastic association whose purpose is body And char- 
acter building. We don't know about character, 
but those kolaches sure build body). 





^ £S hh 



Do we have to spell it out You practical!; rant beat smiling 
VVMT when it conn's to -■ ilni- kolaches '"!>.<> they're the 
Czech national sweel roll made famous by Bohemian Gypsies 



who — especially on week-ends when tral ry— wouldn't 

Bet 1 table without a clutch of smiling kolaches. The middle 
is filled with popp] se< 1 and a] 



WMT 
CBS Radio for Eastern [ova 

"' Iddrest Cedar Rapids • K«j fed h„ n,, R, i . . ... .1 xv ith WMT-TV; K\\MI Fort 



'0NS0R 



1 1 \imui. 1959 



1 '• 




NO TWO 
RATINGS ARE 
EXACTLY ALIKE 



ABC Television, for example, doesn't always 
have five shows in Nielsen's top ten. Some- 
times it's four - or three. 

And it's not always the same shows. Mave- 
rick and Rifleman are consistently there. 
Wyatt Earp, The Real McCoys, Cheyenne, 
Sugarfoot are familiar names in the top ten 
listings . . . but they don't all make it all the 
time." 

( When they don't, though, they're not far 
behind.) 

We don't always dominate the same num- 
ber of time periods, either. One report will 
show us leading the field (No. 1 in 18 half 
hours) . Another will show us in second place 
(tops in 13 half hours). t 

Not every Nielsen will prove ABC to be 
No. 1 network four out of seven nights a 
week. Every once in a while, we're tops in 
only three. * * * 

But Nielsen after Nielsen, one thing is 
consistent. 

ABC is consistently going right to the top. 

Go right to the TOP... go ABC -TV 

ABC TELEVISION 



Source: National Nielsen Reports. Nov '58 — Feb. '59. *la1 Feb. Report. Average Audience Basis 
**TotaI Audience and or Average Audience Basis. ***Sun.-Sat. 7:30-10:30 PM all sponsored evening 
programs. "Nielsen 24-Market TV Reports, weeks ending Mar. 14 & 21, 1959. Sun-Sat. 7:30-10:30 I'M 



more selling power from 
your advertising dollars 



BOST< 
OFFICE 




The tremendous selling-power of Television is widely 
recognized— the unmatched power of sight plus sound 
plus motion. 

And the most efficient form of this tremendous 
power is Spot Television, hecause it permits you to 
concentrate your advertising precisely when and 
where you choose. 

Major question for management today is: how 
can our products take full advantage of this power? 

Helping advertisers and agencies find the right 
answers to that question is the husiness of Blair-TV. 
For in America's top markets, Blair-TV represents 
the stations that consistently lead in selling-power 
per dollar. 



Sound advertising decisions require up-to-the- 
minute data on each of these stations — data you 
can get at a phone-ring's notice through any of 
Blair-TV's ten offices. 

As television's first exclusive national representa- 
tive, Blair-TV was founded on the basic principle 
that alert informed representation is a service vital 
not alone to stations hut also to all Advertising, and 
to the businesses dependent on it for profit-produc- 
ing volume. 

In meeting this year's quotas, keep the power and 
flexibility of Spot Television in mind. And keep 
Blair-TV in mind for stations that do the top selling 
job in many of your best markets. 



A NATIONWIDE ORGANIZATION 



BLAIR-TV 



AT THE SERVICE OF ADVERTISING 



NEW YORK-TEmpleton 8-5800 • CHICAGO Superior 7-2300 • BOSTON- KEnmorc 6-1472 • DETROIT-WOodward 1-6030 • ST. LOUIS-CHestnut 1-5686 
DALLAS Riverside 1-4228 • JACKSONVILLE-ELgin 6-5770 • LOS ANGELES-DUn'*:'k 1-3811 • SAN FRANCISCO YUkon 2-7068 • SEATTLE-MAin 3-6270 



SPONSOR 



1 I VPRIL 1959 



Must significant tv and radio 

urn \ of the ;/<■<•/. with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



II APRIL 1959 

Oovyrlght I0S9 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Detroil should hand the air media a banner 1959-60 season. 

Indications are that both network and spot tv radio will find the introduction of the 
small cars by the big three a tri«i«r<*r for record outlays. In turn, thai mean* Ion-inn 
competitors will have to increase their budgets. 

Spot stands an especially strong chance of snagging a respectable share of Detroit out- 
lays because of this strategy which seems to be pervading the big three: Tie the network 
load to a string of specials and use substantial spot schedules in between. 

Meanwhile summer radio campaigns can be expected from Dodge car and truck. 
Chevrolet. CM Service, and Chrvsler. 

Information gathered by SPONSOR-SCOPF. from various knowledgeable sources, shows 
that network expenditures by the big three for 1959-60 are shaping up like this: 



DIVISION 

Ford 

Fdsel. Mercury 

Ford Family of Fine Cars 

Chevrolet 

Pontiac 

UMS-Delco 

Buick 

Oldsmobile 

Plymouth 

Dodge 

CM Institutional 

TOTAL 



TIME-TALENT fFST.) EMPHASIS 

$U'>.000.000 Expensive weekly hour. Wa?on Train 

7.000.000 Participation in above, specials 

1 .500.000 Specials 

1 0.000.000 Weekly series 

0.500.000 Specials 

3.500.000 Specials 

5.000.000 Special* 

0.000.000 Specials 

7.000.000 Weeklv series, specials 

6.000.000 Weeklv series 

1.500.000 Super-duper special 
S78.000.000 



The kid's section of the Kellogg tv plum is up for grabs again. 
Burnett alreadv has been getting pitches from all sides — reps and networks. Says the 
agency: "We haven't put the 1959-60 plans in the mill as yet." 



The proverbial paperhanger had a cinch compared to what the timebuying crew at 
Lambert & Feasley has just had to go through in connection with Fizzies. 

This 19-week campaign in about 160 tv markets had to get started b\ 21 \pril. and 
the decisions had to be made from among 500 different sets of availabilities. 



Don't be surprised if the package-goods giant. General Mills, winds up among 
the major spenders on tv network specials the coming season. 

The nub of BBDO's recommendation: The Betty Crocker image as the outstanding 
service figure in the food field has become fuzzy after being used constantly to sell the com- 
pany's cake mixes; so the way to return the image to its pristine glamour is to spot- 
light it in specials. 

As you'll recall, in the old days Bettv Crocker's pitch was confined to recipes and the 
ways of skilled baking (with an occasional good word re Cold Medal). 

P.S.: The other General Mills agency, D-F-S. didn't chime in with BBDO. 



ONSOR • 11 APRIL 1959 



17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



National spot tv not only is headed for a record spring but shows signs of g 
ting somewhat longer commitments. 



get- 



The buyers' accent still continues to be on one-minutes, but the reps say that their 
hoards show a gradually decreasing number of open nighttime 2(Ts and I.D.s. 

In both New York and Chicago, however, the trend of summer buying appears to be for 
late night minutes — on the theory that tv picks up its summer audience late in the 
evening. 

Here's a cross-section of how the spot tv buying has been going, by cities: 

MINNEAPOLIS: 20-week schedule for Wheaties (Knox Reeves). 

CHICAGO: Toni into 40 markets for 21 weeks; Rust-Oleum Corp. (O'Grady-A-G) 
into 70 markets, either news-weather or syndicated adventure shows. Alberto-Culver (Wade) 
in 25 markets for 10 to 20 one-minutes weekly for 52 weeks. Revere Camera (KM&J) is 
testing night-minutes in several markets. Kellogg (Rurnett) is introducing Coco Flavored 
Crispies in 25 markets this week. 

KANSAS CITY: D-X Sunray Oil (Potts-Woodbury) buying N. Y. Confidential in over 
100 markets for 52 weeks. 

NASHVILLE: National Life & Accident (Noble-Drury) minutes in top markets. 

CLEVELAND: Diamond Crystal Salt (Duffy, M&W) into 12 markets. Glidden Co. 
(Marcus) testing Southern markets for Instant Grip Glue. Patterson-Sargeant (D'Arcy) 
four-week schedule for spring painting pitch. 



Chicago reps continue to make a bid to get 7-Up back on the spot tv wagon. 

now that the account has departed from ARC TV's Zorro. 

Reports JWT: 7-Up will again have a network show and also use spot radio. 

Looks like Cannon Mills (Ayer) will be back this spring on a white-sales kick. 
The last two-week spot tv campaign Cannon underwrote was in May. with a schedule 
of 30 announcements in about 40 markets. 



A note out of Chicago this week indicates that there's a mounting preference foi 
weekend time among national spot radio accounts — probably due to Monitor's success 

Among the current week's national spot radio buys: 

VASELINE HAIR TONIC: 20-week schedules in well over 100 markets via McCann 
Erickson. 

ELGIN WATCH: Taking a four-week flight, starting 27 April, to supplement its nel 
work tv buys through J. Walter Thompson, Chicago. 

SCHLITZ: 95 markets (including New York for the first time) for 30-40 weeks, ou 
of JWT, Chicago. 



18 



Spot is due to get some benefits from the coffee price war that's broken out in tk 
Detroit area. 

Bon Jour, out of Cleveland, instigated it with its huge saturation blitz due t 
go to June, at least. 

Practically all the national and regional brands have countered with price cuti 

Something that may not have occurred to 5tation people: There are times when a 
agency actually welcomes the pressure from a station on a local distributor. 

Usually that happens when the timebuying department has to make selectioi 
from hundreds of availabilities in a raft of markets in a hurry. 

Insistence bv a distributor that a certain station in the market be given the schedu 
then become a ray of sunshine for the buyer. He's relieved of the decision, and if tl 
choice turns out bad he has an alibi. 

SPONSOR • 11 APRIL 19 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Ted It. iii-- was the No. I buyer of iv network time in 1958. 
NBC TV research, sifting through the network gross time billings compiled bj I'll!, 
found these to he the 10 top network agencic- for last \e.ir: 

RANK AGENCY 1958 CROSS T1M1 HUM' 

1. Ted Bates $52,331,000 

2. J. Walter Thompson 19,864,000 

3. Young & Ruhicam 19,439,000 

4. Benton & Bowles 36,880,000 

5. BBDO 35,055,000 

6. Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample .12.2S6.000 

7. McCann-Erickson 27.60S.OOO 

8. Leo Burnett 24.873.000 

9. William Esty 17.007.000 
10. Compton IS. 117.000 

Note: These figures, of course, can reflect a distorted picture of an agency's relative 
standing, since the ratio of program expenditures is much higher for some agencies 
than others. 

Sure sign that the goldrnsh is on for network tv's 19S0-60 season: The numher of 
peeves and recriminations voiced hy agencies and advertisers already is mounting. 
Latest hatch: 

• Burnett is huraed up at ABC TV for oustins Trouhleshootcrs fMarlhoro) on 
Monrlav night to accommodate Lorillarrl. ABC's version: Tt couldn't accept Burnett's con- 
ditions. 

• P&G is not hanpy ahout (TBS TV's failure to come no with some new periods. 
instead of lettine P&C sit pat with what it alreadv had on the network. 

• Firestone is fidgety over ABC TVs sussrestion that it surrender the Mondav 9-9:30 
p.m. period and alternate with Lawrence Welk 10 to 11 Thursdav nights. 

• Some agencies think CBS TV stalling too much, trvin? to firm up not onlv the 
nighttime schedule hut the pairing of alternate sponsors. 

The urge to duck stiff opposition in the fall alreadv is reflected in actions in- 
volving Loretta Young and Donna Beed. 

P&G didn't like the idea of eontendinjr with Jack Bennv at 10 p.m. Sunday (CBS 
TV) and let Miss Young go. fNBC TV now is offerin<r her in the same spot at $50,000 net 
for originals and $17,000 net for repeats.) 

Camphell Soup is swinjrins Donna Beed over to 8 p.m. Thursdav on \BC TV. 
to escape the Perry Como show on NBC TV. 

Note: There's a school of opinion that this rush to avoid competition is futile 
hecause of the even three-wav split of the audience now prevailing. Instead of troinrr into a 
panic over numhers. this school argues, the asrencv ousht to determine the objective of 
the client and act on the hasis of his hest interests in selling the product. 

Among the week's firm-ups of new ABC TV network shows is a Warner Bros. 
Carihhean detective series in the Wednesday to 10 span, sponsored hv the combination 
of Whitehall, American Chicle, and Carter Products via Bates. \n alternate minute is 
-till open. 

Involved is a special arrangement for the three accounts Checause of the part thev 
plaved last season in setting 77 Sunset Strip under way). 

A likelv renewal within the week is Kodak and Quaker Oats for fVzie & Harriet. 

Another ABC firm-up for affiliates to note: Bourhon Street Beat for Liggett & 
Myers. Monday 8:30-9:30 p.m. Balston-Purina meantime is considering Slezak v\ Son 
and a true adventure series m.c.'d hv John Gunther. 

Incidentally, as of earlv this week ABC TV's nighttime was 60^ sold out for 
1959-60. 

SPONSOR • 11 APRIL 1959 19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

General Foods probably will make its treasury of evening Maxwell House tv 
spots available again this summer to some other advertiser. 

The schedule runs in about 80 markets. ( Last year's Maxwell House spot tenant was 
Bristol-Myers for Ban via BBDO.) 

Greyhound (Grey) will ride NBC Radio for 13 weeks, starting 20 June, with a 
campaign that entails not only lots of local lie-in announcements but special editor- 
ial support. 

The strategy also includes using two of the personalities in the programing pack- 
age, Fibber McGee & Molly and Bob and Ray, for offbeat types of commercials. Editorial ma- 
terial will deal with the benefits of travel, places to go, etc. 

The network this week also got a reorder from Mogen David Wine (Weiss). 



Here's an approximation of what it will cost for a hookup in prime time this 
fall (gross time billings per single broadcast) : 



NETWORK 

ABC TV 
CBS TV 
NBC TV 

ABC TV 
CBS TV 
NBC TV 



MINIMUM LINEUP 
PER HR. 
$78,000 

97,000 
95,000 

PER y 2 HR. 

47,000 
58,000 
57,000 



MAXIMUM LINEUP 

PER HR. 

$ 90,000 

126,000 
128,000 

PER ^2 HR - 

54,000 
75,000 
77,000 



Looks like NBC TV will wind up with the 1959-60 Ford bonanza— Tv's Finest 
Hour— in the Tuesday 9:30-10:30 p.m. niche (time and talent will be $330,000 per week). 

CBS TV's firmups this week include the June Allyson show for duPont (Monday, 
10:30) and a half hour of Garry Moore for Noxzema. 



To show how fast you can move with radio: NBC Radio has on hand orders from 
two auto manufacturers — each conditional on victory in the Mobil Run. 
The schedule is to start as soon as news of the winner is flashed. 



Supermarkets slowly are getting around to the realization that more and more 
of their private labels are fighting a losing battle with advertisers' brands. 

The lower-priced private brand constantly is kept off balance by the fact that two or three 
competitive brands are offered via off-label deals — 10c 4 less, or an additional pack- 
age for a cent extra, or some other gimmick. 

In other words, the private label's posted price advantage is of little moment 
when it has to contend with the rising tide of bargains around it. 



Trendex gave the Motion Picture Academy Awards telecast on NBC TV this week 
iIk highest rating (58.8) and audience share (80.1) ever recorded by that service. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spol Buys, page ")2: News an.! Idea Wrap-Up, page 74; Washington Week, page 77: sponsor 
Hears, page 80; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 94: and Film-Scope, page 78. 



20 



SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 195 



A<?m&£, Mfa $&&*'! 



CampbellMithuruInc. e^d^U^f >££££"* 



March 23, 1959 



Mr Phil Hoffman 
General Manager 
Station WTCN-TV 
Minneapolis. Minnesota 



for 



n pa r Mr. Hoffman: 

Please accept our ^artiest con.ratuaUcn^fo 
, extremely well done on las it weeK^ icularl 



irol^basKftoLrtournaient ^ 
rappy with the way your staff^l 



We are particularly 
'handled every phase 

o a f P SLes L servIcrand^produc-" 

of sales fl awless programming 

of Us ryprrhaveTee^nTh^ Twin Cities 

The tournament ^f age technxcally^^ ^ 
product^n-w.se was excellent^ ^ & ^ 
Northwestern Ban* weic 
professional manner. 

appr eciaUrn\ P o 1 afl%;ofcefn S e^o-re re t hl s a top- 

flight sports presentation. 

:erely , 



Manager 

Radio-TV Production 

Department 



Richard L. 
dh 



Stevens 



Viewers agree, too. ARB Coincidental: 31.9 m . m —** mm 
Rating -43.7% Shore of Audience WTuN' 

Represented Nationally by KATZ Agency Minneapolis 



ABC-TV 

St. Paul 



• 



\M»K e 1 1 \,.|;|| p).V) 



21 



\\\l// 




oPener! 

A / ' N \ - v 
for TOTAL 
COVERAGE 

of the fabulous 

Charlotte Market 

the latest 

N.S.I. 

(NOVEMBER-DECEMBER '58) 

again 

PROVES 

cued 



THE 



best buy 

by far! 



For a revealing comparison of 
WIST's total audience with 
that of any other Charlotte 
station, check the November- 
December N.S.I., or call your 
nearest P-G-W Colonel. 



*£*&4tCL ■ ■ ■ according to Nielsen 

. . . WIST is also clearly the MOST 
POPULAR STATION in the Char- 
lotte Metropolitan Area. 

Peters. Griffin. Woodward, inc. 

I ■ ■ ...-.' Representative/ 

G3ED 

best radio buy 

in Charlotte 

A BROADCASTING COMPANY OF THE SOUTH STATION 










Timebuyers 
at work 




Bernard Rasmussen, Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc., New York, feel 
that TvB should carefully study the rate structure of tv stations 
establish some standard measures by which to determine price. "The 
basis on which stations decide their rates and rate increase* varies 
so tremendously from market to market that it is impossible for ad- 
vertisers to estimate their budgets 
with any kind of accuracy before- 
hand," Bernie says. "Some com- 
parable markets differ as much as 
50% in rates in certain time clas- 
sifications. Yet in today's com- 
petitive market it is important that 
advertisers know on what a station 
bases its rates and rate increase. 
Even a campaign costing IV, 
more than calculated can create a 
difficult situation for most adver- 
tisers. This additional monev is 
bound to cut severer) into the profits when it is not allowed for." 
Bernie thinks that unless definite steps are taken to correct the pres- 
ent rate situation, advertisers may well reduce their expenditures in 
many markets throughout the country in the next few years. "Every 
healthy industry." he says, "is rooted in a sound rate structure. 

Blanche Graham, Reach. MeClinton & Co.. Inc., Los Angeles 
thinks that because of Southern California's unique geographic 
pattern, the Inner is often confronted with a coverage problem 
"\\ hen I need coverage the ke\ stations in Los Angeles are Un- 
economical buys," Blanche says. "These stations are powerfully 

beamed and reach main outKin. 
areas far beyond Los Angela 
county. 1 am not minimizing tlv 
\alue of the smaller stations. Thev 
too. have their place in this com 
plex market. Concentration on 
specific area i- often as importan 
as coverage, and mam of tli 
smaller stations do an excellent jo 
for our advertisers in their low 
communities. I have found the« 
stations indispensable in reachin 
the Spanish-speaking and Negr 
markets." Blanche usuall) buys individual sp<>i> at specific tim< 
rather than packages. Package deals, she feels, are not alwij 
timed right for the product. "Purchasing individual announcemCB 
Is mil onl) a convenience for the client he know- when to listen 
lmi j| enables me to select the best potential audience for him 




22 






SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 19. C 




^^,^7, 



lite watching ]$Mj-TV 

iH- FRESNO (California) 



FIRST TV STATION IN FRESNO 

For example: 

FIRST CHOICE OF WOMEN 
VIEWERS IN THE DAYTIME. 
More women watch KMJ-TV from 
7 a.m. to 5 p.m. than both other 
Fresno stations combined* And 
you reach them with KMJ-TV at 
the lowest cost per thousand. 

•ARB, Oct. 15 - Nov. 11. 1958 



KMJ-TV . . . 

first station in 

The Billion-Dollar 

Valley of the Bees 





THE KATZ AGENCY, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



' INSOR 



1 ipril L959 



23 



RANKS 




1 

where it 
counts* 

No.l 



ST 






cssSSto 



74' 



6:00 AM 

TO 

6:00 PM 

MONDAY 

thru 

FRIDAY 

ELSEN — Dec, 1958 



PLUS . . . 

K-NUZ HAS 

THE HIGHEST 

RATING FOR 

ADULT 

AUDIENCE 

WITH 

SPENDABLE 

INCOME! 



of K-NUZ Audience is Middle & 




Upper Income 

'Special Pulse Survey (Apr. -May, 1958) 

847c of this Audience is ADULT Men 

and Women 

'Nielsen (June, 1958) 

Still the Lowest Cost Per Thousand 
Buy! 



etud 



Houston's' 24-Hour 
-Music andJfews. 



National Reps.: 

FORJOE b CO.— 

New York • Chicago 

Los Angeles • San Francisco 

Philadelphia • Seattle 

Southern Reps.: 
CLARKE BROWN CO. 

Dallas • New Orleans • Atlanta 

In Houston: 

Call Dave Morris 

JA 3-2581 



4-9 th am 
Madisoi? 



24 



Our beer gets a glass 

EDITOR 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS, INC. 
40 EAST 49TH ST.. NEW YORK 
REQUEST PERMISSION TO RE- 
PRINT -BEER— BIG BUSINESS IN 
FERMENT."' FROM YOUR JANO] 
\in 31 ISSUE IN GLASS HORI- 
ZON. OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
OF THE GLASS BOTTLE BLOW- 
ERS ASSOCIATION 

J M RAGSDALE 
RANSDELL INC. 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 

• SPONSOR is always plad lo cooperate whk 
other trade publications with regard to matter! 
affecting the use of tv or radio advertising. 

Good cup of coffee 

Thank you very much for the very 
fine way you treated our Fine Cup 
Coffee story ! And I can certainly tell 
vou this: You are read! Lots of in- 
quiries ahead) as to when we're 
going to hreak open in other areas. 
Needless to tell you our friends at 
Hafner were very much impressed! 

Phil Katz 

Goldman and Shoop, Inc. 

Pittsburgh 

Baseball listening 

We were gratified that you reported a 
few of the findings that resulted from 
the baseball listener study PAIR did 
for KMPC. But. we feel that i 
should set the record straight. 

It was reported in "Sponsor 
Speaks" that ". . . the average listen 
er can anticipate with a high degree 
of certainty, the possibility of am 
play on the field and thus gratify hif 
desire for participation." At the on 
set of our stud) we. too. supposec 
that a desire for participation woulf 
be one of the chief factors involvet 
in baseball radio listening. How< \. - 
the results proved conclusively tha 
such was not the case. Se\entv-nv 
percent of the baseball listeners wer 
found lacking in their ability i 
"identify" with cither a team 
Tins finding caused us t 
further for the underlyin 



piaj er 
search 



i Please turn to page 261 



Sl'ONSOK 



I I \imui. 195 



FARM GALS EYE NEW PASTURES 

But they've been warneaVDy^fceir Mot L 

to stay off Madison Avenue! 

Seriously, this picture is merely to show that 

our farm families of today, here in the Land 

of Milk and Money, look and act just like 

their City Cousins . . . except the farnwr, 

of course, has more money. 

Eye our market: 42% rural and 58% urban 

. . . more than 1,350,000 folks spending 

$1,750,000,000 in retail sales yearly . . . 



bYT^T^^E? IVIwH ilf if .^H i*Ti i 



2-CBS Television. 
Makes a pretty pi 







. 



STEVENS PT 
WIS RAPIDS 



I I VI 
\/^y i s c o rvj s i r-j 

APPLETON 




STURCEON /\ 
^BAY 



OSHKOSH 

FOND DU LAC 

WEST BE* 



MANITOWOC 



SHEBOYGAN 







HAYDN R. EVANS, GEN. MGR. 



THE LAND 
OF MILK 
AND J%)NEY 

WBAY ch. 2 
GREEN BAY 



ONSOR • 1 1 M'KII. 10.V) 



25 




The very air in the presto plant is washed with water pumped at 250 gallons a 
minute from our own private well. The technicians who inspect each PRESTO disc 
have been on the job for a minimum of 15 years, and have the keen eyes that insure 
perfection on a scale no mechanical equipment can match. Ask for presto when 
you order. You'll always know that your discs are PRESTO-perfect. 
bogen-presto CO., Paramus, New Jersey. A Division of The Siegler Corporation. 



r^/ Since 1934 the world' s most carefully made recording discs and equipment. 



CHICAGO? HOUSTON? 
DAYTON? 




NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 



Drug Sales 
Automotive Sales 
General Merchandise 

I'otal Retail s.ilcv 



$ 40,355,000 
$ 299,539,000 
$ 148,789,000 
11,286,255.000 



Population I. "'20, 100 

Households 423,600 

( onsumei Spendable Income 

$1,761,169,000 
Food Sales < ion.isti.iMKi 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 79.4° SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to December 1958 ARB we average 79.4% of audience from Sign On to Sign Off 7 days a 
week. During 363 weekly quarter hours it runs 80° o to 98%. 



KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 

Photo The Johns Manville Products Corporation 1 Watcher, Mississippi, 
manufacturing insulating board and hardboard products from u d fibre. 



CBS • A B C 

A James A. Noc Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



49th & MADISON 

I Cont'd from page 2 J I 
dynamics of the baseball listener. Ad- 
ditional probing showed the baseball 
listener to be a security -oriented in- 
dividual who derives satisfaction 
from the uniqueness of the game. 
Frank J. Bates 
PAIR, Inc. 
Beverly Hills. Cal. 

Public kudos 

On 21 February 1959, our good 
friend Jack Sandler of WQAM, Mi- 
ami, toted up his stations public 
service programing to some stagger- 
ing figures . . . more than 41.000 free 
announcements and 259 hours of free 
programs, valued over-all at about a 
half million. 

We just want to add our kudos on 
behalf of Jack. Our Philadelphia 
client. The Bible Study Hour, broad- 
casts on 128 radio stations in the 
United States. Canada, the Philip- 
pines. Bermuda. Africa and Central 
America. Although it doesn't exactly 
fall in the category of "public service 
programing," Jack has spent a lot 
of free time money in our behalf, and 
we'd like to thank him in a way that s 
more public than a personal letter. 

Liz Vosberg 

mgr., Paul Locke Advtsg., Inc. 

Philadelphia 

Whoops! 

I want to take particular exception 
to a sentence used in your 28 March. 
L959 issue (Film-Scope section I. 

Page 58. second paragraph, slates 
"so far Huckleberry Hound is tht 
onl\ cartoon series to have been fully 
created and produced expressly foi 
television." While I full\ realize da 
vou cannot be expected to verify ever 
printed word, ibis particular state 
n if tit is too broad to be overlooked 

Our Crusader Rabbit was the pio 
neer in the field and has been on fo 
more than eight years. In the sain |j 
issue of sponsor page 66 you B 
ported (correctlj i thai sales of th 
new Rabbit series are over $1.4 mi 
lion to date. 

One very important ke\ to ou 
sales campaign i> Crusader s longW 
it\ and I'm sure you can understan 
our \er\ sincere exception to yon 
statement on Huckleberry Hound. 
talented newcomet to l\ animation. 
R. L Nunn 
;-./>. of mdsg. T if In 
Los Ineeles 



SPONSOR 



I 1 \n;ii. 195 




BALTIMORE IS A WJZ TOWN! 



Baltimore, city of "group" homes ... a city where, 
la most folks know, WJZ-TV has been a leader in 
elevision for more than a year and a half. Why? 

Because WJZ-TV has not lost touch with the 
ommunity it serves. Prime time public service 
•rogramming, editorial comment on important local 
sues, documentary news treatment of civic prob- 



?eb. & March ARB Reports continue to reflect WJZ's long- 
me oivrwhelming dominance in Baltimore; WJZ leads Station 
by 29'-]. Station C by 33%. 



lems, more local live programming than the other 
stations combined . . . these are the reasons why 
WJZ-TV is ABC's top affiliate in 3-station major 
markets and why most people in Baltimore spend 
more time with WJZ-TV than with any other 
station.* Baltimore is a WJZ Town! 

®0® Westinghouse Broadcasting Company. I 



nc. 



'ONSOR 



11 April 1959 



MOST 
HONORED 




OFTEN 
i 



An important measure of the performance of a 
television network is the recognition accorded its 
programming by responsible independent groups 
with varied interests. NBC has just received seven 
Peabody Awards for distinguished achievement 
and meritorious public service - more than the 
other two networks combined. 

So far this year, NBC has also won: 

13 out of 20 Sylvania Awards 

15 out of 22 Radio -Television Daily Awards 

7 out of 14 Look Magazine Awards 

15 out of 30 first places in Television 
Today's poll for Fame Magazine 

10 out of 15 Freedoms Foundation Awards 

4 out of 9 Christopher Awards 

the only Alfred I. DuPont Network Award 
(for a news commentator). 

Thus 1959 is following the pattern set in 1958 
when NBC, its programs and personalities, re- 
ceived more awards than any other network. 

These awards span the full spectrum of NBC's 
programming: drama, news, public service, enter- 
tainment, education, music, variety, sports, reli- 
gion and comedy. In their breadth and diversity 
they illustrate the basic philosophy of America's 
first television network: totality of program serv- 
ice, rewarding television for every program taste. 

NBC TELEVISION NETWORK 




Matter 

How You 

Survey 

The 

Memphis 

Market.., 




It's Channel 3 First By All Surveys 



In Memphis they say "There's more 
to see on Channel 3." That's 
because more people enjoy WREC- 
TV's combination of superior local 
programming and the great shows 
of the CBS Television network. It's 
the right combination for your 
advertising message. See your Katz 
man soon. 



Here are the latest Memphis Surveys showing 
leads in competitively rated quarter hours, 
sign-on to sign-off, Sunday thru Saturday: 





A.R.B. 


Pulse 


Nielsen 




Jan. 12-Fb. 8 '59 


Feb. '59 


Dec. 7-Jan. 19 '59 




I Metro Areal 


1 Metro Area! 


(Station Area' 


WREC-TV 


223 


251 


259 


Sta. B 


110 


109 


71 


Sta. C 


57 


19 


81 



WREC-TV 

Channel 3 Memphis 



Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 




30 



sim^soi; 



11 APRIL 195' 



SPONSOR 



APRIL 



"I THINK 

THE 

RADIO INDUSTRY 

OUGHT 

TO BE 

SPANKED" 



Frequently the most pungent, pointed, and valuable remarks which 
^POySOR hears about air media problems are M not for publication." 
Here are some outspoken comments about the current state of radio 
hy a marketing executive who insists that his name and identity be 
kept confidential. His company, a multi-million dollar advertiser, is 
i long-time user of radio (and other media). He. himself, came tip 
through advertising and brand n-ork. 

Onr first question: "W hat do you think of radio today?" 



\. I think that radio, as a national 
idvertising medium, is in lousy 
hape. \nd I think the industr) 
lUght to be spanked for letting itself 
:et into this position. 

Q. Why spanked? 

\ Because there is absolutely uo 
eason for the abnormally low vol- 
ime of national advertising dollars 

pent toda\ in radio — exeept the lack 
if imagination, integration, and lead- 
> ship within the industry. 

Q. \S hat do you mean by ab- 
lorniallv low volume? 



\. Look at the 1958 figures. When 
you squeeze out the water and pub- 
licit) puffs, you'll find that lasl vear 
national advertisers spent less than 
$200 million for radio in network 
and national spot combined. That's 
a disgraceful total. Less, I suspect 
than the\ spent in trade papers. 

Q. Don't you think the chief 
reason for low railio volume is 
the rise of l\ i 

\. 1 certainly don't. 1 think the 
chief reason i~ that radio men have 
been throwing awa\ their birthright. 




PONSOR 



11 APRIL 1959 



31 



Q. Hut surely lv has hurt. 

A. Tv was hound to take business 
awaj from '/// media. But there was 
no reason for il to hurl radio more 
than the others and that's what's 
happened. Il is inexcusable. 

<^. How do you figure that? 

A. In get a clear picture of the 
stupidit) of the present situation, 
go back in the days before tv. Over 
a L5-year period — between, sa\ . \ ( >'.'>\ 
and I ' > 10 — radio proved conclusively 
that it was a better selling medium 
for man) big national advertisers 
than either newspapers or magazines. 
Yet along came tv. and radio began 
running like a scared chicken. It has 
-lipped far worse than print. 

Q. What sort of advertisers 
proved radio better? 

A. The big ones — P&G, Colgate. 
Lever, General Foods. Standard 
Brands, American Home, the tobacco 
companies, the oil companies. Corn- 
panic- like mine that are close-fisted 
with an advertising buck. 

Q. But radio doesn't have 
sight, or color or pictures. 

A. Radio proved, in the '30's, that 
it has something better than pictures, 
type, color. It proved that the hu- 
man voice has more personal sales 
wallop for most products than any 
form of print advertising. That's 
what the boys seem to be forgetting. 

Q. Hut how about complicated 
things like demonstrations, con- 
tests, promotions. Don't you 
need visualization? 

A. I'm not saying it doesn't help. 
But I am saying that 15 years ago 
P&G got more mileage <nit of a con- 
test or a promotion or a deal pro- 
moted on radio than they ever got 
out of print. Before tv. radio was 
the most effective advertising medium 
ever devised. Today, however, it's 
running a miserable fourth with 
both newspapers and magazines wa) 
ahead ol it. There's no sense in this 
situation. 

Q. Yes, but radio audiences 
are not what they were. 

A. If you're talking about audi- 
ences t>> individual shows, you're 
right. \nd you can'l buy radio as 
\nu mice did. Bui Mm can reach 
even biggei radio audiences. Todaj 
.ni\ -in. hi agenc) timebuyei can fig- 
ure a spot schedule thai will delivei 



12 



as main homes in the course of a 
week as libber McGee or Bob Hope 
ever did in their heyday. No you 

can I blame radio's decline on smaller 



audiences. 



y. Where then does the fault 
lie? 

A. With the people in the radio 
industry. They have no one to blame 
but themselves? 

{). All right, what people? 

A. I d say the networks, the sta- 
tions, the reps, the trade associations, 
everyone. You can make the list as 
long as you like. 

y. Where do you think they're 
wrong? 

A. I don't think any of them seem 
to have an idea of how big the radio 
industry can and should be. I think 
all of them are too concerned with 
some small segment of the business. 
And 1 don't see any constructive over- 
all industry planning or promotion 
coming from anyone. 

Q. How about the agencies and 



advertisers? Don't they have 
some responsibilities too? 

A. I've heard that question before 
and 1 think it's a sillv one. Agencies 
and advertisers, of course have an 
interest in the medium. But the re- 
sponsibility for radio's welfare and 
growth lies with the people who are 
in it. And the sooner they accept 
this responsbilit) — and stop blaming 
others for their predicaments — the 
better off thev II be. 

(^. ^ mi don't think they're ac- 
cepting this responsibility? 

A. No 1 don't. In the past three 
vears I have not seen a convincing 
presentation, from any source, on the 
over-all values of radio as an adver- 
tising medium. I've seen a lot of 
little half-hearted, two-hit pitches or 
whv networks are less foolish than 
spot, or whv indies are smarter than 
old line stations. I've seen a lot of 
chicaner) and razzle dazzle — yes and 
charlatanism with research statistics, 
and jargon. But I haven't seen any 
real radio sellin". 



IllllllllUllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllillllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllliillllU 



DO YOU AGREE WITH THESE FOUR 

1. LACK OF INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP, ifnong 

agencies and advertisers ( in addition to the interview quoted 
here) sponsor has heard, in recent weeks, an increasing 
amount of comment to the effect that radio is a "leaderless" 
industry; that one of the chief reasons for its present position 
is that it has no individuals or organizations to speak for the 
entire business. Instead. sa\ critics, it is bedeviled l>\ man\ 
conflicting interests, and l>\ a lack oj industry focus. 

2. LACK OF BUSINESS PLANNING, lecording n 

mam high-level marketing men. radio is an industry withom 
any sort of constructive, long-range business plan for self 
improvement. Though a number of observers, including SPON 
SOR in its $500 Million Plan for Spot Radio, have elearh 
pointed out long overdue improvements in radio's operating 
methods, the industry has taken no constructive steps to ge 
these improvements made. 

-rn\ SOH « ill H eli on ' .erne 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllillllllllllllll 

SPONSOR • 1 I V1MUI. 195 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiinni 

I VIMUL 195. 



g. Have you seen SPONSOR'S 
1500 Million Plan for Spot Ra- 
tio? What Ho you think of it? 

A. I think \ ou people did a good 

oh of anal) zing w hat's w rong. Bui 

rank!) I in skeptical as lit -I I whether 

he industr) is ~in.ni enough or cares 

h In ili> anj thing about it. 

o What do you think the in- 

lu-n\ needs most right now? 

\ First of all a recognition that 

must have an entirelj new type >>f 

nlii-ii\ machinery. None of the 

resent organizations are satisfac- 

n\. tin- \ \H has neither the char- 

•r. the franchise, or the personnel 

i promote radio actively. Ix \l> rep- 

esents onlj the sales end ol the busi- 

u .iinl operates, to m\ mind, on a 

hum league level. It i- bound up by 

icmber-non-member jealousies, and 

>y a limited, close-to-the-vesl idea of 

>hat the job is. SK \ is too small a 

art ot the total picture to function 

>r the industry. \nd the networks 

:re so harassed b) their own prob- 

•in- the\ can't -peak for radio as a 



vt hole. \\ hat radio must ha> e is a 

new . -tl nirj 0] uani/al inn. 

Q, Musi this organization Im* 
divorced from t> ? 

\. Definitely yes. In mj < >| >i n i • > r > 
the best thing thai could happen to 
radio would be for Congress to pass 
a law making ii illegal foi radio and 
t\ properties to be held bj the same 

ownership. The i :lose association 

w ilh l\ has hurl radio Iri i ibl) . 

< t ». How about the problem of 

reconciling the interests of m>t- 
work and spot radio? Can this 
ever be solved? 

\. It can be solved once the net- 
work- recognize what ever\l>od\ else 
seems to know: thai radio li.dax has 
become a local medium. That's its 
strength, that's its appeal to an ad- 
vertiser. Network and national spot 
are merer) two dillerenl ways for the 
national advertiser to bu) the tre- 
mendous local power, the community 
|iower of radio itself. Each has its 
place, but it> the local appeal of the 
medium that provides the reason for 



4 



/lilllillllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIilllli:. lllll!!i!!IIIIIIIl!llllll!!l!llllllli 



iERIOUS CHARGES AGAINST RADIO? 
J. LACK OF CREATIVE PROGRAMING. The pro- 

ram side of radio. sa\ sonic ol its severest critics, has fallen 
hto the hands ol men who neither care about the medium, nor 
arc an.) ahdit\ to create new, imaginative patterns oj pro- 
ranting. Is a result, radio is being "formularized" to death. 
ometimes these formulas arise simply out ol a desire to make 
quick dollar. More often than not. however, they're mercl\ 
'ie result oj ignorance <>/■ lack oj imagination. 



k LACK OF CREATIVE SELLING. Both agencies 

nd advertisers hare complained to sponsoh about the t\pe oj 
lies presentations the 1 ) hare been getting from radio people. 
he\ say that practically none contain am sound, compelling 
rguments for the medium itself; instead most are built around 
\icayune, insignificant points for complex and dubious re- 
h. Is a result, they are getting no help in selling the idea 
f radio to their own people and their own clients. 

ith th.> state of radio todnj and would likr to n improve nt in radio • 



■whiii:iiii;-!!i„ HiiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin;.;: 1 

PONSOR • 11 A PHIL 1959 



both types "I sales. \nd both 
work and spol should promob this 
local imagi 

Q, Suppose radio bad a strong 
centra] industry organization* 

\\ bat BOrl ot work -boubl it un- 

dertake? 

\. I \b\ iousl) there ar< two kinds 
ol pi oblems. Firsl i" i lean up all thi 
inside-the-industr) things thai 
w rong with radio too much papei 
work. n\ ii complicated i ate i ards, 
unfair rate differentials, all the me- 
chanics. Second, to create .1 1 ontinu- 
inu. strong, ami successful promo- 
tional efforl thai will increase ii- 
share "I national business. One joh 
i- cot rective, the second creative. 

<,» W bat do yon think it would 
take to create a radio Organiza- 
tion that could accomplish this? 

\. \ lot more raw, red, old fash- 
ioned desire than most radio people 
seem to feel toda) . 

Q. How would such an organi- 
zation differ from those now in 
existence? 

A. To make any sense at all it 
would have lo be a planning, and 
operating body, headed bj men who 
were capable of mapping out and 
executing broad scale industry -trate- 
gies. Ii would have to speak for the 
whole industry — at least in the na- 
tional advertising held. Vnd it would 
probabh need a budget at least 
double anything evei sel up for a 
radio trade organization. 

i). \\ hat Mould such an or- 
ganization of tin- radio industry 
mean to a national advertiser — 
to a company like yours. 

A. W11I expeel such an organiza- 
tion to show u- new wa\- to use radio 
for greater sales and profit-. We'd 
expeel it to help us sell 1 adio to our 
own management and people, and 
keep it sold. We'd expect it to build 
prestige values inl u radio pur- 
chases l'\ upgrading the whole in- 
dustrj . \nd we'd l"ok to ii t" opei 
ate, with 11-. on a high policy level 
in all our radio advertising. 

Q. Beyond all this, whal do 
you personally think of radio'.' 

\. I personally believe it is one 
of the greatest advertising mediums 
ever dei ised. It i- nol a health} med- 
ium toda) . Bui I love 1 adio t"i w hat 

I kimw it can and -limild be. ^^ 



33 




MARKETERS BLUEPRINT advertising, merchandising strategy at Necco: (from I), Richard M. Drown, adv. mgr.; Gordon P. Henti, dir. of mktg 

Necco sweetens sales with spot 



^ Progressive candy maker pushes branded bar and 
box candy with 90% of $1 million budget in spot tv 



™«n 112 \ears, the New England 
Confectionery Co. lias been selling 
\ rt >< ■ i jeans notorious knoshers and 
nibblers on knoshing and nibbling 
on it- 360 \ ai ieties of cand) items. 
Rut the fastest sell in all (his time 
has come in the six years since L953, 
u lien the compam used telc\ ision ad- 
\ ei tising for the In si lime. 

< and) items, pai ticularl) the •"><• 
ami In,- bars which rack up most of 
the sales, olid a -mall margin of 
profit to both produce! and retailer. 
For either to see those sought-after 

34 



ss s i litis in li onl ol In- eyes. he needs 
to have high volume moving fast. 
Thai s what t\ has done for New I. up- 
land Confectionery Co. in Cambridge, 
Mass., says Adverti-im: Manager 
Richard \l. Drown. 

Necco is currentK putting some 

8093 lo 90ft of its total annual 

advertising budgel ol >l million into 
spol television with the remaindei 
going into point-of-sale pieces and 
printed promotional matei ial. I Ids 
$900,000 appropriation foi a section- 
al, non-national advertiser is a sig- 



nificant Mini in an) kind of businefl 
Rut in cand) manufacturing, \sliei 
so much of the product is sold ui 
branded and then packaged by foo 
chain- and supers themselves, this ii 
vestment is rivaled onl) l>\ sue 
giants as M & M. Sweets Co. (Too 
sie Roll I and ( ihunk) Chocolate. 

Proctor A. Coffin, general merchai 
dising manager, has the responsibilil 
of mo\ ing those 360 indi\ idual cand 
item-. Fortunately, there's nowha 
near thi- number to cope with in coi 
sumer advertising and the spot ' 
schedules. The two major cand) I i in 
the Necco line and the Cand) Cll 
hoard line are radically different i 
content and price and therefore I 
quire ver\ differenl merehandisil 



SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 19f 



i 



V 






roctor A. Coffin, gen. mdse. mgr. 



it 



v mix 



ales and advertising techniques. 
1 In- four leaders in the Necco line 

re bar items — Sky Bar. a 22-year- 

ld chocolate product which was the 
rsl to he advertised with tv in L953 

ad which sells for a nickel: Necco 
afers, a candy staple since 1885 
hit li debuted on tv last fall and sells 
>r 5c: Rolo, a hot-selling item (ran- 

bised originally from a British firm 

ith a chocolate base and a 10c 1 price 

1 anada Mints, another KV item 

irst featured tv advertising last fall. 

The Necco line of inexpensive bars 
s sold to jobbers and to food chains, 
tut the Candy Cupboard line of ex- 
tensive ($1.40 per pound and up) 
oxed chocolates is sold only to re- 
aders directly. 



Chocolate items in the Nec< o line, 
of course, sell best in coolei weather; 
in i ti t - in the warm months. I hi- is 
wli\ there is a seasonal variation in 
the Necco advertising period from 
Septembei through Ma) . w itli choco- 
late i\ [ n-- stressed in the firsl half, 
mints in the latter. 

Sk) Bai sales, aftei a t\ momen- 
tum of six years, continue to move 
upward al a good pace. But Rolo, 
introduced for the first time last fall, 
caught like wildfire with the public 
and lias -ecn phenomenal increases. 
Specific sales gains were reported for 
Baltimore whereWMAR-T\ tarried 
a schedule typical of the 2!! markets 
in which Necco Inns >pot announce- 
ments l>\ Chris. S. Briel, Necco 

salt s ic; n>. Mitati\r llin e. 

Lasl December, after the launching 
campaign which started in Septem- 
ber, he told \\ MAR-TV management: 
"I have spenl considerable time work- 
ing out an analysis ol -ales on Rolo 
and Sk) Bar to our 57 direct buying 
accounts who distribute in Baltimore. 
Analysis was based on September 
through December '57 (when do t\ 
ua> used i and September through 
December of '58 i when the \\ MAR- 
TV schedule was on the air)."' 

In this period, sales on Rolo 
"showed a phenomenal increase of 
KK).68% and Sk\ Bar went up 
37.01%," Mr. Briel reported. Sk) 
Bar was already established in the 
market and therefore "not expected 
to show a markedly heavy sales in- 
crease" as was the case with the 
comparatively new Rolo. 

Necco's pattern is to buy minutes 
from 5 to 7 p.m. in 2!! major market 
areas centering in it> distribution 
area — the New England and North- 
east sections. Middle and South At- 
lantic. Midwest through Ohio and 
Indiana, the West Coast. The) have 
direct sales representation in these 
areas, use brokers at points in be- 
tween. 

The average frequency of commer- 
cials per market is nine one-minute 
— 1 > < • t — pel week, aimed at an all-fam- 
ilv audience but concentrating more 
heavily mi youngsters and teens. 
Mom and pop are nibblers through- 
out the day. too, even though young- 
sters seem to average a bit more total 
consumption «>f goodies. 

Spot's flexibility is what attracted 
the client and the agency, C J. La- 



Ro( In- in New York, to t\ in the In si 
plai e and the) use ii i" maximum 
a<l\ antage. I he) rotate pi odu< i- di 
pending on bui Ii fa< tors as the ' om 
munity, rising "i falling sales, the 
Beason. Bui evei \ minute i ommei 
cial has a major product and a minoi 
in oducl allotted, respo tivel) . some 
10 se < •!!■ I- .mil 18} 2 bo onds "I i om 
men i.il time. 

I lie flexibilitj "I Bpol i«b-\ ision 
enables Nei co t" maintain the ad 
balance eat h mai ket requires bal- 
ance in term- of majoi -minoi i om- 
mercial mention, weight "I frequenc) 

and audience. Because each m.iikel 
bin i- based largeh on month-to- 

miiiitli sales, a revised t\ schedule is 
made up monthl) and senl t" each 
station in the lineup a month in 
rib ance "I ail ing. 

The prefei red pi oduction to h- 
nique which has paid olf in getting 
\i ivei attention and enhancing appe- 
tite appeal is a combination of ani- 
mation and live-action with differenl 
opens and closes. Thus the basic 
stock of two different commercials 
for each nf the four main bai items at 
an) given time is expanded with three 
variations of opens and i loses to a 
total of five different presentations. 

Necco wants to reach an all-family 
audience for another reason: both 
men and women, frequently accom- 
panied b) youngsters, have the super- 
market shopping habit. And candy, 
often an impulse item, is picked up 
from a shelf by brand because of a 
carryover "f the visual l\ picture. 

Each Necco product carries an 
identifying Necco label, and man) 
of the items are specially packaged 
for the supermarket trade I now ac- 
counting for some 20'~r to 30% <>f 
{Please turn to pnge ''2 i 



FOOD STORE DISPLAY racks get about 
one-fourth of Necco's manufactured volume 
and indicate variety of 360 different items 






•I'ONsmR 



11 APRIL 1959 




What the allocations fight means 



^ FCC testimony by Maximum Service Telecasters 
stresses losses in coverage if vhf band is dumped 

^ MST's material will likely provide useful ammo to 
counterattacks directed at television's spectrum space 

^ Public's vested interest in vhf channels via huge 
investment in receivers is pointed up by broadcasters 



I 



n the brief span of its existence tv 
has struck deep roots into the Ameri- 
can scene. Yet no ad medium has 
been under attack on so many fronts. 

Last week two developments re- 
minded the ad fraternity that the 
technological base of the present tele- 
vision structure is also subject so 
assault. The FCC resumed discussions 
on the tv allocations headache and 
the deadline passed for filing of 
petitions on the broader but related 
problem of whether (or how) to 
reapportion the "non-government" 
portion of the vhf-uhf spectrum. 

The spectrum stud) harbors a 
strong potential threat to video. Im- 
portant groups, including the mili- 



tary, railroad and trucking interests, 
electronic firms, etc., are hungrily 
eyeing the wide frequency band cur- 
rently allocated to tv. Tv's vulner- 
ability stems from the fact that more 
than half of the spectrum being stud- 
ied ( 25-890 megacycles I is now set 
aside for telecasting. 

In the forefront of those defending 
the video band from being undercut 
is the Association of Maximum 
Service Telecasters. The group con- 
sists of 120 vhf stations I it had two 
uhf members at one time) operating 
at the maximum effective power per- 
mitted by the FCC. AMST filed com- 
ments at deadline urging (1) reten- 
tion of the present vhf channels, (2) 



^;iniJ!!fN'f! , ::, i 1 iii,;; l -;n' ! '- ,, iiim ;,-, ,. ;:..[im .^ ;. : j.. .:.; i : : ,-iiii:- u: : ..mmm. mm 'in. :.,n m. .ii!::':i:h ; .m. ;!,. 

NEARLY 1,000 TV STATIONS ARE AUTHORIZED 

Number of tv stations as of 21 February, 1959 

Channels 2-13 Channels 14-83 Total 

Stations On tli«- Air: ^^__ —- ___^^_^^ - _^^_^^_i^^^^^_«^^^^— 
( ommercial 414 68 482 

Educational 29 8 37 

Commercial Satellite 20 7 27 

Translator 162 162 

Total On the Air 463 245 70« 

Authorized, Not on Air ; 

Commercial 32 111 1 13 

Educational . 8 16 24 

Commercial Satellite .. 6 2 8 

Translator 11 11 

Total Authorized 46 170 216 

Total 509 415 924 

T\ station fjrowth has been fast, figures gathered In Association oj Maximum 
Service Telecasters show, iftei II years there are 11 authorized ii stations 
pei channel. It tooh standard broadcasting 2f> years to reach that level oj 
frequ in \ loading. < Imris on pages 37, 38, 70 and 72 m. from IMST group 

.iiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii! iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiin 




Jock Harris, general manager, KPRC-TV, 
Houston, is president of Maximum Service 
Telecasters, deep in the tv spectrum battle 

the addition of more vhf channels. 
(3) a swapping of uhf spectrum 
space for the additional vhf channels 
and warning that any "degrading'' 
of the current high technical stand- 
ards would deprive rural America of 
adequate tv service. 

Also filing at deadline was the 
1XAB, whose chief. Harold E. Fellows, 
warned that an adequate tv service 
must be assured in the future to aid 
advertisers in creating demands foi 
goods to satisf\ America's rapidly 
increasing population. Fellows fore 
saw the need for main smaller tv sta- 
tions, comparable to standard broad 
castings 250-watters. 

On the technical front. Fellow* 
called for the status quo until I 1 i the 
recently-released studies conducted b\ 
the Television Allocations Study Or 
ganization (TASO) are digested anc 
(2) some allocations solution bt 
worked out vis-a-\is the go\ernmen 
and non-government services. 

Included with the VMS T comment! 
1>\ the group's executive director 
l.estei \\ I in. low . u ,i- ,i compn 
hensive exhibit of facts and figures 
Involving a year's work to gather 
these will likeh provide \aluablt 
ammunition to broadcasters in th< 
coming battle for spectrum space 
Specifically, the) spell out some o 
the basic economic facts of life abou 
t\ and the firm place occupied by t* 
in the American home. They alsi 
delineate the consequences foreseei 
b\ WIST in the even! of a shift t< 
an all-uhf t\ service. Onh a smal 
part ol these facts and figures touchet 
on advertising per se. but the imp]] 



36 



SPONSOR • 1 I \PRIL 195* 



to admen 



PI 1(1.14 II VS INVESTED 125 BILLION IN T\ 



Estimated public expenditure for t\ 



cations foi the business were obvious. 
I bese are the highlights of the Lin- 
don testimony : 

• The Vmerican public has i"- 
Lrested more than $25 billion in n 
sets, components and repairs. 

• In spending $600 million on 
thysical equipment, broadcasters 
iave brought t\ service to 99% of 

Unerican families and serve 90' - 
if these families with network pro- 
graming from at least three stations. 

• The average l\ station costs 8.7 
urn - as much to construct as a radio 

Station and ().'i times as much to 
iperate. 

• \- of 21 Februar) 1959 a total 
tj 1,015 t\ stations l commercial, ed- 
jcational and translator) were either 
in the air. authorized or the subject 
»f pending applications. After 14 
ears there are twice as many tv sta- 
ll m- authorized as there were radio 
stations after the same length of time. 

• The average \iewei spends 20' < 

• I !ii- waking life watching tv and 
spends more time with tv than with 
radio, newspapers, magazines and 
■no\ ies combined. 

• The •")() million tv sets in use is 
'II times what it was 10 years ago 
ind twice as main as five years ago. 

• Although tv occupies three- 
piarters of the non-government spec- 
rum space between 25-890 mc. it 
ias onlj 3.5^? of the total number 
>f channels assigned in this space. 

• \ switch to uhf would deprive 
it least 25', ,,|" the land area of the 

v I "service of consistently good 
jualitv.* In actual practice the area 
\ould actualK be larger. This would 
larticularl) affecl the I 1 million per- 
■ -us living on farms who now enjov 

[\ as well as non-farm resident- in 

rural areas. 

• TASO studies show that when it 
otnes to good quality service, low- 
land vhf channels 1 2 to 6) get out 
wire as far as high-band uhf ehan- 
i'-is ill to 83) and cover five times 
is much area. 

In urging a swap of uhf for vhf 
pectrum space. AMST could look 
orward to some official discussions 
Jong this line- though with no as- 



Year 


Retail value 
of receivers lOOO) 


Antennas components. 
servicing, etc 1 000 1 


Total public 
expc mlilur 000) 


1946-54 


$10,684,500 


14,453 .no 


- 1 , i 18,000 


1 «>.->.-> 


1,788,800 


1,050,000 


2,838,800 


1 956 


1,457.11)0 


1.21 II I.I 10(1 


2,657,100 


1 or,: 


1. -.111.1110 


1,300,000 


2,604,100 


1958 


1,150,300 


1,350,000 


■. 100,300 


Total 
1946-1958 


$16,384,800 


$9,353,500 


$25,738,300 



liillillllllll! 



Consumer spending data for t> receivers, 
parts and repairs includes sets ol .ill kind-. 
including color. Sources of data include 
Electrical Merchandising. Ti Digest a- well 
as Sylvania Electric's F. W. Mansfield 



FCC annual summaries up through 1957 
are the source i>f figures at right. The 1958 
figure is an WIST estimate. Excluded are 
costs of translators. Replacement value 

of broad, a-t pmpert\ i- much higher 



Tv ba> become a billion dollar business 
in 10 years. Figures are from FCC, cover, 
like chart at right, network* and stations. 
Note leveling off in rate of increase of 
both revenues and expenses in recent years 



TVS BROADCASTING 
INVESTMENT IS LARGE 

Original cosl of tangible tv 
broadcast property 



Year 


Original cost 




195» 


-MMI.OIIII. 1 


est.) 


1957 


Mi,. UK,. ill iii 




1 956 


129,680,000 




1955 


364,748,000 




1954 


315, '.in >" 




1953 


233,134,1 




1952 


121.129.000 




1951 


92,982,000 




1 950 


70,260,000 




1949 


.V>.o75,000 





Him 






i 


BROADCAST REVENUES ARK 

Total broadcast Percent 
Year revenues (000> increase 


AROIM) SI 

Total broadcast 
expenses < 000' 


BILLION 

Percent 
increase 




1957 


$943,200 5.2', 


$783,200 


10.7', 




1 '»5o 


896,900 20.4% 


707,300 


19.0', 




1955 


744,700 25.6% 


594,500 


18.3% 




1951 


592,937 37.3% 


502,637 


39.4% 




1953 


431,777 33.4% 


300.514 


34.6', 




1952 


323,594 37.3% 


267,902 


38.0% 




1951 


235,684 122.5% 


194,086 


68.6% 




1950 


105,914 208.5% 


115,128 


93.2% 




1949 


34,329 294.6% 


59,591 


152.5% 




1918 


(..Tim 358.8% 


23,600 






aillllllillll 


■Willi. 


_ ' M. 







SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 1959 



3? 



J 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiw 

TV ADVERTISING HAS DOUBLED IN FIVE YEARS 
Tv's share of all advertising. 1919-58 



Year 


Total 
advertising 


Total tv 
advertising 


Percent tv 
is of total 


1 958 


$10,196,000,000 


$1,360,000,000 


13.3% 


1957 


10.310,600,000 


1,273,400,000 


12.4% 


1956 


'^.90 1.700.000 


1,206,700,000 


12.2% 


1955 


9,194,400,000 


1.025.300.000 


11.2% 


1954 


8,164,100,000 


809.200.000 


9.9% 


1953 


7,755,300,000 


606,100,000 


7.8', 


1952 


7,156,200,000 


453,900,000 


6.3% 


i »r> i 


6,426,100,000 


332,300,000 


5.2', 


1950 


:>.: io.ooo.ooo 


170,800,000 


3.0% 



1949 5,202,200,000 57,800.000 1.1% 

Ill|||||llllll!llllllllllllilllllllllllllllll!llW 

McCann-Erickson figures prepared for Printers Ink is the source of chart above. Besides 
tv, media include radio, newspapers, magazines, outdoor, business papers, direct mail, miscel- 
laneous. Tv figures include all client spending: time, talent, production and commercials 



iiiLMiiiii;!.;'!!!; 1 .;:!!!!!; ...i,ML...ii,:' ..;i:i.. ..i:.: :..iL jm: 11 ^r: :.;iu- ...in...!iiii , :...iii!' :i!iir ..ii;ii];;ii!':- .m;: .■" .:!! , ^;:ll!■!'.,; 
SWITCH TO UHF WOULD AFFECT FARM HOMES 
Television set ownership of farm households 





Total Farm 
Households 


Farm House- 
holds with tv 


Farm House- 
holds with tv 


Tv population 
on Farms 


Jan . 58 


5,300.000 


3,611,000 


68.17c 


14,082,900 


Apr. 57 


5,320.000 


3,323,000 


62.5% 


12,860,000 


Aug. 56 


5,642,000 


3,207,000 


56.8% 


12,218,760 


Feb. 56 


5,649,000 


2.966.000 


52.5% 


11,300,460 



June 55 5,694,000 2,407,000 42.3% 9,411,370 

IllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW 

Farm figures here include households actually located on farms and do not cover small town 

families which would also be affected by reduced service, according to AMST estimates 



surance anything would come out of 
it. Reportedly because of public pres- 
sure, the Defense Department has 
agreed to sit down with the FCC to 
discuss swapping of frequencies. 

AMST made no specific proposals 
as to how many additional vhf chan- 
nels should be assigned to telecasting 
or in what part of the spectrum the 
new channels should be placed. One 
proposal would be to add 38 addi- 
tional vhf channels so as to make a 
continuous band of 50. There is cur- 
rently room for 14 vhf channels in 
lielw ceii the |>i .-<i il ehannels (> and 7 
— assuming other services (including 
fm) are displaced. If the other 24 
are allocated spectrum space fol- 
lowing channel L3, it would carry the 
additional "vhf" channels into the 
lower reaches of the uhf band — 
which arbitrarily begins at 300 mc. 
If all 38 were inserted in the band 



.;:: 



above channel 13 (216 mc. and up I 
the highest frequency channel would 
brush against the beginning of the 
current uhf television band — which 
begins at 470 mc. Obviously, getting 
38 new "vhf" channels in the strict 
sense of the term is no cinch. 

The big problem in adding tv 
channels is the heavy demands video 
makes on the spectrum. Each tv 
channel requires a 6 mc. (million 
cycles) band and, as AMST pointed 
out, each channel needs every bit of 
the space. But, as AMST also pointed 
out. the actual number of tv channels 
allocated is relatively small. 

An analysis prepared by AMST 
showed that there were a total of 
2,346 channels assigned in the non- 
government portion of the 25-800 mc. 
band. Only 82 are set aside for tv. 
In the vhf part of the spectrum, the 
(Please turn to page 70) 



Getting 

^ Enthusiasts for expensive 
audio-video gear cover wide 
economic range, Andrea 
finds. Radio blankets 'em al' 



/%sk Frank A. D. Andrea, veteran 
tv and stereo manufacturer, what a 
"quality market" is and in the light 
of his latest marketing experiences 
he'll give you this broad concept: 

• It's basically a conglomeration 
of people who choose to spend their 
money on quality merchandise. 

• They needn't necessarily be mil- 
lionaires nor have Phi Beta Kappa 
keys; the big point is that they should 
act that way — either because of their 
own compulsions or because they 
"want to keep up with the Joneses." 
In short, it's the manner in which 
people choose to spend their money 
that counts. 

From this observation Andrea 
logically has proceeded to the next: 

• To sell quality merchandise, a 
fairly broad media base is desirable. 
It has to go bevond just the "high- 
brow." 

• Radio is a medium that defi- 
nitely gives this kind of all-purpose 
coverage economically. 

A pioneer in the electronics indus- 
try Andrea only recently got com- 
pletely back into consumer merchan- 
dise after a run of government work. 
His distribution areas are highly- 
competitive metropolitan New N ork. 
New Jersey, and New England : his 
products are tv sets and a qualitv line 
of stereo and hi-fi equipment. 

An 85% sales increase in the first 
quarter of this year over the same 
quarter of last year now is in the hap. 
But first Andrea had to choose his 
strategy from two alternatives open 
to him last summer: 

1) He could either introduce hi* 
new models in a flashy explosion 
i the usual industry practice), or 2) 
he could introduce the new iteia 
gradually during the \ear as the mar- 
ket was ready for them. 

The second course was by far the 
more prudent, but it required a close! 



SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 1955 



radio to select 'Quality Buyers' 



check on consumer reactions, \dded 
to thi> was a distribution problem: 
In order to maintain price stability 
i the onlj wa) a qualit) line usually 
can survive), a limited dealer fran- 
, blse policj had to he observed. 
rhere are about 300 active dealers. 
Ihii> the product isn't likel) tn be 
found in the first store a buyer 



stumbles into. I In* poses a problem. 

When Donei \ Peck iimk over the 
account lii-i summer, this factoi 
loomed large in it- media recom- 
mendations to Vndrea. 

"The buyer had to be conditioned 
to the fact that it would lake some 
looking around to find an Andrea. 

says account supervisor and agencj 



v.p. Sanford I.. Hirschberg. " \\ ho - 
more, a desire t" keep looking bad i" 
In- instilled. I In- mean) more im 
pressions aftei thai first lun< h-houi 
browsing foi an Vndrea had proved 
to be fruitless. 

" \t the same I ime, I lii si hbej g 
-a\-. "the initial impact baa i" be 
i Please turn to page 6 1 I 



HAND-MADE CONCEFT (here illustrated by Anc'rc.i) can best be emphasized via personal appeal of radio to quality conscious" prospects 




PART TWO 
OF A TWO- 
PART SERIES 



What is the answer to 



SPOT'S PAPERWORK JUNGLE? 



^ How to hack away at the paper tanglewood that makes 
spot five to 30 times harder to buy than other media 

^ In this installment, two methods are explored — a 
simplified rate card and billing for the station by reps 



^9 omething for nothing is always 
paid for," goes an old saying that 
gets proved daily in the paper laby- 
rinths of spot. For those frequency 
discounts given away to advertisers, 
agencies pay in bookkeeping and 
estimating manhours. 

Most admen agree that it is the 
complex pricing of both spot tv and 
spot radio which is the taproot of 
the medium's troubles. From this 
root, stem estimating headaches, bud- 
get confusion, invoice errors, exten- 
sive checking and re-checking time, 
billing disagreements and delayed 
payments. 

"There's no hope for the whole 



business," an agency financial execu- 
tive told sponsor, "unless stations 
start using something other than 
prices to sell." 

Newspapers, at least five times 
easier to buy than spot, can attribute 
much of this simplicity to having 
pretty well eliminated the old "sliding 
scale ' rates. About 100 papers are 
reported to still use them, although 
in the case of some large metro pa- 
pers the frequency needed to earn a 
substantial discount is so great that 
for most advertisers it is out of the 
question anyway. However, sponsor 
learned in checking with admen that 
of late there is the beginning of a 



mysterious trend among newspapers 
back to sliding scales. "Since the) "n 
out to compete with spot on all other 
fronts," mused one adman, "it may 
be they want to compete in compli- 
cations, too." 

The chart on page 41 compares 
the steps needed to put a spot cam- 
paign on the air with the steps needed 
to put a comparable newspaper buy 
on the presses. Some of the reasons 
for spot's greater number of steps are 
organic and not curable, unless the 
medium ever finds a way to sell by 
circulation rather than ratings — 
which is highb unlikely. \nother 
organic complication is that spot 
sells time instead of space: you can 
add pages to a newspaper, but vou 
can't add minutes to a broadcast day. 
So there will always be checking on 
avails. (Actually, a lot of progress 
in speeding up this operation has 
been effected by streamlining at rep 
offices and stations, bv introduction 



One answer: The Katz Agency handles billing for its stations. Here is the billing and estimating section at Katz. Standing are (I to r) H. J. 
Grenthot, assistant treasurer and director; Emily Horton, billing department head; S. T. Jones, assistant to Grenthot. Details in text 




i standard confii mation-conti a< I 
,,iih, b) SR \ and I \ -. 

I>ut a lot of the buying time in 
poJ i- -[ >*-i ii wrestling with rate 
tructures, and this could be cured. 
be answer: simplified rate cards. 
t the answer ever i> supplied, it w ill 
u a long waj i" soh ing the othei 
najor area of spol advertising. Be- 
ause the major paper thunderbolts 
li.il now plague it arc: 

• Complicated rate structures. 

• Billing and checking tangles, re- 
lilting in great | >art from rate struc- 
ires. 

Since these are the principal 
nafii-. what i- being done about 
iem; and what remains to be done? 

Rates: Last week's installment 

1. 1 of sonic of the movements to- 
ard ridding spot of the national 
s. local rates problem. Even il this 

h i- licked through genera] adop- 
ion of a single rate, there still re- 
tains the problem of individual sta- 
on rate structures based on complex 
ic.|iicnc\ discounts and package 
I. in-. 

5H \ and R \B have Keen working 
■ ward sonic solution. The 1 \ -. 
l!D v even \\\ have been study- 
tg the subject. I lie latest move in 
ie direction of rate card simplifica- 
ion. however, has come from a sta- 
lon representative Richard O'Con- 
ell Here is ( )'( .onnells formula for 

streamlined rate card: 

1 1 i Elimination of nil frequency 
iscounts, therebj eliminating all 
liort rating and rebating. 

(2) Flat rating of all time seg- 
tents, starting with the half hour 
own to one minute. 

Institute weekly announcement 
lackages, covering all spot needs 
i.e. 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 50 week- 

■ : each package to be less expen- 
\c than the preceding, hut all in 
ound dollar figures. 

I I stablish 20- and 30-second 
Dnouncement costs at 75$ of com- 
arable minute rate-: LO-second spots 
i 50 

\llow multi-product client- to 
oinhine announcements for better 
-•ckl\ rale-. 

\- a i oncession to adv ertisers who 
ave become so accustomed to "re- 

ards" for frequency that they 
ouldn't do without them (regardless 

"\-OR • 11 APRIL 1959 



LESS PAPER IN PRINT THAN SPOT 

Here's ti step-by-step comparison <>l what is involved m <i t^nnu- 
ket Inn in 1'iini mill in s\itit. In case oj print, "costing <>ui >i<il.- 
inu. prices uml individual media to client i has been don* before 
step \i>. I. This often is done on neu rpapei Inn: not with tpot 

NEWSPAPER 

- When campaign has been approved, buyei advises 1 1 n ■ estima- 
tor (usuall) l>\ memo). traffic and forwarding are also alerted 

2 Estimate goes to traffic department. Prioi "costing out was 
tnade eas) because papers -ell on circulation, have simple rates 

2 rraffic department next i>-ue> authorization for the campaign 
to the forwarding departmenl so thai orders ma\ he sent oul 

4. Forwarding issues orders to publications. I nless bu) was in 
a hurry, buyei ma\ never have to phone a rep or new-pap< i 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 

6 
7 
8 



SPOT 

Assuming budget is approved, buyei calls in the rep- of all 
stations in the .">() market-, a-k- fm li-i of availabilities 

Hu\er notitie- Irallic department of general nature of campaign 

SO that lhc\ can ucl read\ to -end out eop\. tran-c liption-. etc 

Buyer receives avails from various stations. Now he checks 
ratings, package deals, prices, power, frequency, programing 

Timebuyer contacts the station reps and order- his schedules 

Buyer notific- traffic department now of specific schedules 

"■Mime of the schedules that were ordered cant be confirmed b\ 
station-. Now the timebuyer must go through re-ordering them 

Confirmations of schedules come in from reps, and the time- 
Inner must check to see that they are as ordered, rates correct 

After all the schedules have been checked against rates, pack- 
age deal-, times. the\ are pui on estimate against latei billing 



of the cost of paperwork to check up 
on them i. O'Connell suggests that 
stations give free extra spots. \n 
example: for e\er\ 2d weeks of con- 
tinuous advertising, one week -ehed- 
ule gratis. O'Connell threw in this 
concession because about IV < of the 
buyers he had contacted made known 
their desires Eoi long-term discounts; 
his personal feeling, however, i- that 
a client i- on the air for a longer time 
nol for a "reward"" from the station, 
hut because his campaign need- a 
longer airing for besl results. 

"Station operators," O'Connell 
maintains, "are guilt) of nol keeping 
pace with their customers' problems. 
i Vmong agency problems: how to 
stretch the IV, commission to cover 
such new services as marketing and 
merchandising and -till meet the 
high cost of spot paperwork). "Fre- 



quency discount has been the culprit."" 
says O'Connell, "along with short 
rate and rebate. All three are a 
hangover from the ver\ earl) days 
when most stations inherited their 
rates from newspaper ownership." 

Billing: If and when rates are 
simplified, it will go a long wa) 
toward straightening out the Chinese 
puzzle that i- now an accepted pari 
of agenc) checking and accounting 
departments. Here is how agency- 
men view present station procedures 
and invoicing systems: 

" I'he hiu problem," -a\ - I . Paul 
Mullei. assistant treasurer at Y&R, 
"is thai there i- no uniformity in the 
method of hilling among the stat 
Some bill gross; then th< agenc) 
must deduct. Others bill net. I 
discounts are allowed b) some sta- 
i Please turn to page 661 



41 



HOW TO CUT TV TAPE COSTS 



^ BBDO saves 40% over live production expenses in 
taping of Westelox commercials for new campaigns 

^ Trick lies in consolidating schedules, avoiding mul- 
tiple labor charges, eliminating costs of special repeats 



W 



hen CBS TV announced this 
week that tv tape commercials made 
on its facilities would no longer bear 
a $15 per-splice editing charge, it 
marked one more step in the long 
path to get tape costs down. 

\< tuallv. progress to date has been 
little short of spectacular. Last week 
BBDO told sponsor that the new 
tape commercials it is making for 
Westelox will cost 40% less than il 
the whole batch had been done live. 

And — what is almost unbelievable 
— BBDO was able to wrap up a total 
of 15 minutes of Westelox plugs for 
only a few dollars more than six 
minutes' worth cost the same client 
just a half a year ago. 

The answer, according to BBDO 
live production head Al Cantwell. 
lies in getting the know-how of sharp 
housekeeping. When the agency taped 



six minutes of Westelox commercials 
for the Wonderful Town special last 
fall, the client immediately saw that 
— properly used — tape needn't be a 
cost orgy. So it didn't take much per- 
suading to get him to give the nod to 
a bold cost-saving experiment for the 
spring push. 

The plan this time: Don't confine 
the taping to the six minutes of com- 
mercials that would be needed for the 
26 April Meet Me in St. Louis special 
the watch company is underwriting. 
At the same time, the agency sug- 
gested, pick off the nine commercials 
that would be needed for a six-week 
alternate sponsorship stint on Name 
That Tune beginning 13 April on 
CBS TV. In short, do two jobs at 
once. 

This meant a total of 12 commer- 
cials. "Right off the bat," says Cant- 




AIRTIGHT PLANNING enabled BBDO to turn out 10 tape commercials with nine major set 
areas in two shooting days. Pre-planning: (I to r) BBDO art dir. Alphonse Normandia (seated), 
prod. Bill Jackson, live production head Al Cantwell, Rotondo scenic designer Willis Knighton 



well, "we could see it was impossibl 
to do this in the two days of actua 
taping that the job would have t- 
be held to for cost efficiem v." 

The solution: Repeat two of tli 
nine Name That Tune commercial 
making a total of seven 60-secom 
commercials and three two-minut 
St. Louis commercials. "We could se< 
our way clear to bringing that pack 
age home in a two-dav time limit.' 
Cantwell says. 

Mutually agreeable shooting date 
were the next consideration. Bets\ 
Palmer, slated to do the St. Loui 
commercials, wasn't available unti 
Sunday, 12 April. George DeWitt 
Name That Tune emcee, slated fol 
three commercials for that show 
could not tape them till 13 April. th( 
day the first commercial was to hreal 
on the air. This meant firming up i 
Sunday-Monday taping schedule w itl 
Saturday for setting up and lighting 
"Fortunately." says Cantwell. "the 
studio we wanted at CBS was avail 
able for those three davs." 

Willis Knighton of the P. J. Ro 
tondo design firm was put on the job 
of fitting 26 set areas within a desig 
nated space. There were nine majoi 
set areas. 17 minor >els i many of 
them display areas I to squeeze in. 
Knighton's specifications called for 
the sets to be placed around the walls 
— as in a live dramatic show — with a 
major set area in the middle. One 
major set. comprising three areas, 
covered one entire wall Isee photo). 

Incidentally, Cantwell emphasizes 
the extreme importance of getting all 
basic lighting out of the way the da\ 
before. "This is win it takes at least 
a 12-hour day," he savs. "if you're 
luek\ ." 

The trick, obviously, is to make 
every minute of the total three days 
count to the maximum. Note, in the 
actual schedules shown on the oppo- 
site page, how not a moment i- idlfc 

Moreover, this squeeze-play tech- 
nique extends to other areas. Foi el 
ample, Cantwell cites the example of 
how he gladh spent $90 in editing 
costs to save a far heftier talent fee 
Here's what he did: Bather than have 
an actor appear on two days to df> 



12 



SPONSOR 



1 1 vpril 1959 



leparate commercials, Cantwell taped 

ill the actor's chorea at once: later lie 
plit the tape up and spliced the 

where the) belonged. 

This shortcul "Id hat in film— is 
tow full) possible with tape. Previ- 
,u-\\ technical difficulties prevented 
widespread use of it. W henever you 
pliced tape heretofore, you either 
rot 1 ' a roll-over of the pit lure, or 
' seven seconds of blackout, i In a 
BBDO special for DuPont a year ago 

The Red Mill the agenc) chose 
., use roll-over as the lesser of two 

\ik I 

llui now, Cantwell explains, roll- 
iver has been eliminated. Ml you get 
oda) i- "glitch" wherever splicing 
.. curs. 

"Glitch" is slang for the "momen- 
BTJ jiggle" that occurs at the edit- 
nii point if the sync pulses don't 
natch exactl) in the splice. ("Glitch" 
irobabl) comes from a German or 
*1 iddi-h word meaning a slide, a glide 
br a slip, i "Even if it occurs," says 
Cantwell. "it isn't bothersome to the 
newer unless lie knows it's there." 

BBDO had a prett) fair chance to 
\oik out the law of averages on the 
Kxurrence of "glitch" with produc- 
ion of Hamlet for DuPont. which 
V88 taped in sections and put togeth- 
er mi the editing machine. Out of 73 
plices, Cantwell reports, 10 con- 
ained some "glitch. This l-in-7 
lossibilit) is a negligible factor, he 
eels, for something you can't see un- 
esa you're specificall) watching for 
t. There are four points, then, in 
me of the St. Louis commercials 
khere this "momentary jiggle"' may 
>ccur. hut the agency isn't worried. 

Consolidation of client's time, 
% hilt* not a below-the-line technical 
ost. is important, too. The Westclox 
icople lieu in over the weekend, sat 
n on the tapings, and client approval 
in longer became a thing to ponder. 

Major cost-saving areas for tape 
omniercials. summarized in the box 
>n the next page, set forth details in 
low BBDO saved IO r c of what twelve 
westclox commercials would have 
ost live. 

\ -mailer, but equally significant 
laving, was made in rental of prompt- 
ing devices. These are rented on a 
paily basis at roughly $125 a piece 
her day. Here, the agency saved a 
good 75' i of what it would have cost 
I Article concludes next page I 



TAPING lO COMMERCIALS IN 3 DAYS 



SATURDAY, 11 APRIL 

9:00 a. m. -9:00 p.m. Scenic and lighting setup 






■A**?* 



V**H 



SUNDAY, 12 APRIL 

8:30 a.m. Betsy Palmer in makeup. E.S.U.* 
9:30-10:15 FAX*— "Floral" (S.L.*) 

10:15-10:45 T.P.* 

10:45-11:30 VTR*— "Floral" 

11:30-12:15 FAX- -"Greeting Card" (S.L.) 
12:15- 1:00 

1:00- 2:00 

2:00- 2:30 

2:30- 2:45 

2:45- 3:15 

3:15- 4:00 

4:00- 4:30 

4:30- 5:00 

5:00- 5:30 

5:30- 6:00 

6:00- 6:30 




VTR— "Greeting Card" 

Lunch 

FAX-Intro & close— "2 men" (S.L.) V> ^P* 

T.P. 

VTR-Intro & close— "2 men" 

FAX— "Coquette" (T*) 

VTR— "Coquette" 

FAX— "Plug" (T) 

VTR— "Plug" 

FAX— "Ballet" (T) 

VTR— "Ballet" 



** 



c*s . 



MONDAY, 13 APRIL 



7:30 a.m. 
8:30- 9:00 
9:00- 9:30 
9:30-10:00 
10:00-11:00 
11:00-11:30 
11:30-11:45 
11:45-12:15 
12:15-12:45 
12:45- 1:00 
1:00- 1:30 
1:30- 2:00 
2:00- 2:30 
2:30- 3:00 



E.S.U. 

FAX— "2 Men" (S.L.) 

T.P. 

VTR— "2 Men" 

Lunch 

FAX— "2 Men" (T) 

T.P. 

VTR— "2 men" 

FAX— "Album" (T) 

VTR— ■ 'A 1 bu m" 

FAX— 'Travel" (T) 

VTR— "Travel" 

FAX— "Bedroom" (T) 

VTR— "Bedroom" 



s 



7* 



jJX *> d*<( • 







3 / +fi +-C*iJ 






•PoN-.ni; 



11 APRIL 1959 



♦E.S.U. (Engineering Htap), FAX ( Camera rehearsal), T.P. (Teal pattern), VTR 
(Record), S.L. (2f««l kh 'm St. I ■■ ■■■ C ffam* rAot IHitM) 



43 



if the prompters (one for each of 
three cameras) had been re-rented for 
each commercial. 

Trucking, a major saving, was a 
big factor in effecting economies for 
another client — Campbell Soups — in 
a series of daytime commercials. 
Normally, Cantwell points out, BBDO 
does not tape commercials for day- 
time fare because here the savings 
are usually greater in sticking with 
less elaborate live techniques right 
in the studio. But a series of 11 
commercials for Campbell in the 
Peter Lind Hayes Show on ABC TV 
required an elaborate kitchen setup. 

The cost of these commercials 
would have been $900 a piece. But 
by moving the equipment only once 
and taping the whole series of com- 
mercials at once, it was possible to 
do them for $500 each. 

By and large, however, BBDO does 
not recommend taping daytime pro- 
gram except under unusual circum- 
stances. For this reason, a break- 
down of BBDO commercials follows 









m^ / 1 , 



« 



f/ii "' ti 



TRUE TONES are big advantage of tape 
over live. In shot above, hasty lighting 
could have made gold watches look black 

roughly this pattern: Tape — 40%, 
live— 10%, film— 50%. 

Nighttime commercials, being more 
elaborate than their daytime counter- 
parts, suffer more from having to be 
lighted and rehearsed in the sched- 
ule of a live program, Cantwell be- 
lieves. Greater refinements of light- 
ing, scenic effects and product dis- 
play are possible, he says, when sev- 
eral commercials are done at once, 
the crew has warmed to the job and 
technicians become familiar with 
product setups. 

Added to this, he says, are the ad- 
vantages of group planning in ad- 
vance — and during taping sessions — 



at a saving of time to all concerned 
Editing refinements give copvwrit 
ers greater leeway, he says. Copy- 
writers at BBDO are advised to keej 
live techniques in mind, but they cai 
inject shots calling for cuts if the\ 
first bring the problem to Cant well 
and his staff. This procedure \\;i 
followed with a remote commercii 
for Pittsburgh Plate Glass taped la r 
Wednesdays (8 April) for the Gam 
Moore Show. Cantwell sees the edit 
ing breakthrough as a big stimulus 
to doing tape remotes hitherto i in 
possible. He cites automobile com- 
mercials as one example where com 
plicated running action can be pieced' 
together with sections of tape. 

With editing and other technical 
problems no longer the hazards they! 
were but a year ago, the present and 
future of cutting tape costs hinges on 
your ability to tuck as many loose 
ends as possible into one neat pack- 
age. In short, the faster and neater 
your housekeeping job is, the more 
money vou save. ^ 



glllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

6 WAYS BBDO SAVED ON TAPE COMMERCIALS 



1 REPEATS: Live commercials usually can 
be repealed successfully only by doing 
much of the basic job all over again — live. 
Savings: 20% when tape is used. Two of BBDO's 
nine Name That Tune commercials were planned 
for repeats right from the start, required no fuss- 
ing and re-doing later on. 

2 STAGEHANDS: Frequent assembling and 
re-assembling of crew burns up a lot of 
extra money in live commercial production. 
Savings: 50% on this item when BBDO tele- 
scoped 12 commercials {counting two repeats) in- 
to two continuous sessions, plus a day for setting 
up and lighting all areas. 



4 



3 



LIGHTING: Individual setups for live 
commercials multiply technical fees and 
costs of studio and camera facilities. 
Savings: 60% when BBDO concentrated 10 com- 
menials in 2(> set areas and put up all the neces- 
sary basic lights 21 hours in advance. I Ins elimi- 
nated rhubarbs when actual taping began. 



TRUCKINC: It costs $200 to move a sin- 
gle truckload of equipment to the studio and 
bach to the warehouse, a big budget item. 
Savings: 70% when nine Name That Tune and 
three Meet Me in St. Louis commercials were 
trucked for $600: for live production, the job 
would have cost around $2,200. 

5 CAMERAS: Camera facilities {"fax") 
time for live commercials is based on hour- 
ly rate. Three cameras were needed. 
Savings: 35% for tape versions, due to 1) better 
teamwork on a continuous job, 2) fewer test pat- 
terns, 3) various other consolidations. 



6 SETTINGS: Design cost for two commer- 
cials runs ; $250-300. Mailing commercials in 
small batches involves more specifications. 
Savings: 25% when specifications and design 
time arc wrapped into one bundle. Cost for 10 
commercials: $1,200 — a saving of $300. {Set con- 
struction costs sta\ about the same.) 









r^iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



illlllllllllllll 



nwiiiiiii 



44 



SI'ONSOK 



1 1 u'ltii. 1959 



/• 



TV BASICS/APR. -MAY 



Season highlight: more hour shows 



V Ni«'l>«*n stud) of p.m. aetwork iv show lengths ialli«'> 
)."> one-hour shows (luring a month in 1959; JW> in 1 *).>}{ 

* Comparagraph changes include hough Line replacing 
lehind Closed Doors; Ccdifornians for George Burns 



■ w itli the network t\ programing 
neup enter in i: its third 13-week c\cle 
Sr this season, the general picture of 
irviving show lengths looks like 
lis: 

The 60-minute programs came 
rough strongly, as compared with 
-t season, while the number ol half- 
mi shows were reduced. 

This was highlighted in a Nielsen 
iid \ for sponsor on a three-season 
imparison of sponsored nighttime 



network -how lengths, based on the 
second lelnuarv and lir-t March re- 
ports each year. 

\lthough the number of hour 
shows are up over la.-t year and about 
the same as two seasons auo. their 
format has changed considerably : the 
live dramas are ju-t about dead, with 
western and mystery-adventure hours 
replacing them. 

This increase cut the number of 
half-hour show- hack to I ">."). 



Mm \l| study, 
houi - pei month : 

Hl<>\\ TYPE L959 

I.Vmin. .".' L . 

30-min. 155 

60-min. 95 
90-min. 9 

fotalhours: 267V 2 



|v;,;; 

7 

172 

86 

9 

274 



total 

it,: 

I,., 

L50y 2 
96 

21 

_';;!' | 



The neiwoi k i ..iii|i.ii.cji.i|ili. on the 

following pages, -how- these changes: 
NBC l\. Pete Kelly's Blue's, Eoi L&M 
follows the half-hour-earlier Steve 
Allen: The CaHfornians replaces 
Geor Burns 'for Colgate). Laugh 
Line, for American Home, replaces 
Behind Closed Doors. 

On CBS TV. Ran hide moves back 
replacing } our Hit Parade and fol- 
lowed b) Pharmaceutical's Amateur 
Hour. ^ 



L. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 



letwork Sales Status Week Ending 11 April 

Daytime 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiifli 
SPONSORED HOURS 



m 



■mi 



Nighttime 

IIIHg pm»l!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIN^ 

SPONSORED HOURS 



milium ii Jimiiiiiiiiiii. 

Exrludlni pirtlrlpttlon ihowi 



ABCt 
CBSt 
NBC 



■23:50 
■28:10 



127 :30 



ABCt 

CBSt 
NBC 



124:20 



123 :45 



Average cost of network sponsored programing 



,! ■! 



Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Half-hour comedy-var. 
$51,250 4 

Half-hour mystery 
$36,500 8 


Half-hour drama 
$40,333 6 

Half-hour adventure 
$30,188 8 


Situation comedy 
$39,643 14 


Hour music-variety 
$111,875 4 

Half-hour western 
$38,165 17 


Quiz-Panel 
$27,250 9 



Averages ar 



nlBhtt iho 



>\-ur; 



II w>i;ii. 1959 



IS 




NIGHTTIME 



C O 







P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS 



NBC 



The World 

of Ideas 

Bust 



tifleet The Press 

BUBt 

Tournament of 
Champions 

ayuk (Wermpn 
& Schorr) 
(6-7; 4/26) 
Sp-L $160,000 



I 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Twentieth 
Century 

prudential 
(R-McC) 



Chet Huntley 
Reporting 



■Jo net service 



D Edwards 

Amer Home 
(Bates) 



News 
Bulova (Mc-E) 
-L $6,500tt 



D Edwards 

BAH (DDB) 

rtuPont (BBDO) 



News 

sust 

«-L J6.500tt 



fou Asked for It 
Skippy Peanut 

I Butter (GBB) 
f-F $24,000 



Lassie 

Campbell Soup 

(BBDO) 
.-F $37,000 



Mark Saber 
3t«rlin« (DFS) 
F $50,000 



No net service 



'Jo net service 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 
Amer Home 
(repeat feed) 



News 

Bulova 

(repeat feed) 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 

enson & Hedges 

DuPont 

( r e p ea t l ead) 



News 
Kemper 

sust 
(repeat feed) 



A 



Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 
Caiser Co (Y&R) 
Tackett (Y&R) 
r-F $70,000 






aehelor Father 

m Tob (Oumb.) 
F $42,000 

alt uks 

Jack Benny 

m Tob (BBDO) 

!-L $65,0(HI 



"Steve Allen 

RCA (K&E) 

(7:30-8:30) 

uPont (BBDO) 

H. Curtis 

(Weiss) 

-L $108,000 



Tales of The 
Texas Rangers 
(7:30-8:30) 
Sweets Co. 
(H. Eisen) 
F $11,000 



Maverick 



Ed Sullivan 

(8-9) 
Mercury (K&E) 
It Kodak (JWT) 
T-\j $79,500 



Dean Martin 

Timex 
Doner & Peck) 
(8-9; 5/3) 
L $250,000 



hirley Temple's 

Storybook 
7:30-8:30 every 

third week) 
J. H. Breck 

(Ayer) 
ir-F $65.000 



The Texan 

Brown & Wmsn 
(Bates) 

'V-F $37,000 



Name That 
Tune 

American Home 

(Bates) 
|-L $23,000 



Buckskin 
P&G (B*B) 
'-F $24,000 



Restless Cun 

Sterling Drug 

(DFS) alt 

P&G (Compton) 

-F $37,500 



Cheyenne 

(alt ivks 

7:30-8:30) 

Harold Ritchie 

(K&E) 
ohnson & .Tohnson 

(Y&R) 
.rmour (FC&B) 
1 y"^ f\nn 



tars in Action 

sust 



Dragnet 

Mennen (N&L) 

alt 

P&G (B&B) 

Hy-F $35,000 



Tfu 



Law fr 

lymf 

rui 



Sugarfoot 

(alt wks 

7:30-8:30) 

Am Chicle 

(Bates) 

R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

F $78.000 



Playhouse of 
Mystery 



Steve Canyon 
L&M (Mc-E) 
<l-F $44,000 



Pl>n 
L, 



Law Man 

| R. J. Reynolds 

(Bsty) 

General Mills 

(DFS) 
-F $41,000 



Ed Sullivan 



Pete Kelly's 
Blues 

L&M (Mc-E) 
. ,-F $54,500t 



Bold journey 
Ralston-Purlna 

(GBB) 
,-F $9,500 



Father Knows 
Best 

x:ver (JWT) alt 

Scott (JWT) 
!c-F $38,000 



Wells Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 

(SSC&B) 

alt Buick 

(Mc-E) 

V-F $43,800 



Wyatt Earp 
Sen Mills (DFS) 
alt P&G 
(Compton) 
V-F $38,000 



To Tell the 

Truth 

Carter (Bates) 

Marlboro 

(Burnett) 

L $22,000 



)immy Rogers 
L&M (DFS) 
-L $35,000 



)zzi« 
Kod* 

r- 



Colt .45 

Colgate 

Harold Ritchie 

(K&E) 

Beech-Nut 

(Y&R) 

iV-F $13,800 



C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 

(liliDO) 

Or-F $51,000 



"Dinah Shore 

Chevy Show 

(9-10) 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 
-I, $150,000 



Voice of 

Firestone 

Firestone 

(Sweeney & 

James) 

lu-L $32,000 



Danny Thomas 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

fcc-F $47,500 



Peter Cunn 

Bristol-Myers 

(DCS&S) 
fy-F $38,000 



The Rifleman 

Miles Lab 

(Wade) 

P&G (B&B) 

Ralston 

(Gardner) 

V-F $36,000 



Arthur Codfrey 
Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 
-L $31,000 



George Burns 
Show (L 4/14) 
Colgate (Bates) 
3c-F $40,000 

The Californians 
Colgate (Mi B] 
jit sust (4 21 si 

O-L %v,m 



Do 



Deadline For 
Action 

(9:30-10:30) 
sust 



Hitchcock 

Brist.-M. (Y&R) 
Vly-F $39,000 
Meet Me In 
St. Louis 
Wstclx (BBDO) 
Pliilco (BBDO) 

(9-11; 4/26) 
Mu-L $525.000 



Dinah Shore 
Chevy Show 



Top Pro Coif 

(9:30-10:30) 

sust 



Ann Sothern 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

3c-F $40,000 



Mcoa-Coodyear 

Theater 
Mcoa (FSR) alt 
5oodyear (Y&R) 
Or-F $39,000 



Naked City 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

Brown & Wmsn 

(Bates) 
Hy-F $37,000 



•Red Skelton 

l'et Milk 

(Gardner) 

S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) 
-F $52,000 



Bob Cummings 
Reynolds (Esty) 
alt 
11 Bishop 
Spector) 
Sc-F $36,000 



h 



Deadline For 
Action 



Richard 
Diamond 

Lorlllar.l l.*N 
$36,000 



Loretta Young 
P&G (B&B) 
r-F $42,500 



Top Pro Coif 



Desilu 

Playhouse 

(10-11) 

Westinghouse 

(Mc-E) 

Dr-F $82,000 

(average) 



Arthur Murray 

Party 

P. LoTillard 

(L&N) alt 

Pharmaceutical 

(Parkson) 
r-L $30,000 



Alcoa Presents 
Alcoa (FSR) 
r-F $35,000 



Carry Moore 
(10-11) 
tevlon (LaRoche) 
L $59,000 

(M hr i 



David Niven 

Singer (YAH) 

alt BU8t 

Hr-F $:i2.»00 



trow 



Meet McCraw 

Alberto Culver 

(Wide) 

IA-F $9,500 



-L 



What's My Line 
Kellogg 
(Burnett) 

alt Sunbeam 

Q-L $32,000 



"Sid Cacscr O 

Art Carney 
Kcxall (BBDO) 

3/3) 

L $250,000 



ohn Daly News 

.orlllard (L&N) 

L $6,000 



No net service 



Lucille Bill 
Desi Arnaz 

Show 
Westinghouse 

(Mc-E) 
(10-11; 4/13) 



No net service 



|ohn Daly News 
Lorillard (L&N) 
N-L $6,000 



No net service 



Carry Moore 

KellofT 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Pittsburg Plate 

(Maxon) 



Hall of Fame 

Hallmark 

re&B) 

in 30 n : 1 IB] 

Dr I. ■" 



*Oolor show, ttCost is per segment. Prices do not include sustaining, par- They do not include commercials or tame charges. This chart covers period 
tieipating or co-op programs. Costs refer to average show costs including 11 Apr. -8 May. Program types arc indicate! as follows \i AdvenUM 
talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency commission) . (Au) Audience Participation. (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, ( Dr) 



If, 



SI'ONSOli 



11 M'HIl. 1 ( )59 



-- 



GRAPH 



11 APR. -8 MAY 



CNESDAY 

NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



News 
Drug Ri 



D Edwards 
Whttehill 

(Hates) 
N-L $9. 500ft 



News 

Norelco 

(La Roche) 

Sterling il> t Si 

K-L $6.500tt 



D Edwards 

Equitable Life 

(FCJkB) 

Fit. Cltnit 

N-L $9.50ttt 



News 

Norelco 
(LtRoohe) 



No net service 



No net service 



No net service 



News 

Druf Research 

(repeat feed) 



ABC News 
sust 



D Edwards 
Whitehall 



wagon I rain 
S:30> 
Ford (Tar. hour) 

IJWT) 

National Biscuit 

(var. H hr.) 

(Me-B) 

W-F $35,500 

(H hr.) 



News 

Norelco 

alt Sterling 

(repeat feed) 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 

Equitable Life 

Fla. Cltrui 

(repeat feed) 



News 

N ■■rtlco 
(repeat feed) 



Leave It To 

Beaver 

Miles Lab 

(Wade) 

Ralston 

(Gtrdner) 

Sc-F $36,000 



I Love Lucy 

Pillsbury 

(Burnett) 

tit 

Clalrol (FCAB) 

Se-F $35,000 



efferson Drum 

Sweets Co. 

(Henry Eiseti) 

tit sust (L 4/23) 

W-F $18,500 

Texas Rodeo 

sust (4/30 S) 



Rin Tin Tin 
Nabisco (KAE) 
A F $36.00< 



Your Hit Parade 

Ann Tobacco 

(BBDO) 

Mu-L $12,500 

(Last 4/24) 

Rawhide 

morei to 7:30- 

8:30. 5/1 



Northwest 
Passage 



Dick Clark 

Show 

Beech Nut 

Life Savers 

i YAK) 

Mu-L $14,500 



Perry Mason 

(7.30-8:S0) 

II C Moores 

I 1:4 It 

Parliament 

(BAB) 

My-F $25.70« 

(20 mln. 



People Are 

Funny 

Tonl (North) al 

R. J. Reynolds 

(Eaty) 

Au-F $24,000 



■aha 

DOS) 



Wagon Train 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
various H hrs) 



Zorro 

AC Spark 

(Brother) 

f-Up (JWT) 

A-F $37,000 



Dec Bride 
Gee Ptji ibabi 

Se-F $32,000 

Show of Month 
DuPont (BBDO) 
(8-0:30; 4/23) 
I>r I. 



Lawless Years 



Walt Disney 

Presents 

S B 

Quakir Oats 

iWBT) 

M-F $47.00( 



Rawhide 

(8-9) 

Lever (JWT) 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkion) 
W V $80,000 

(1 hour) 



Further Advent 
of Ellery Queen 
I • 
RCA KAE1 
I/IT * 3/1 only 
My-F $27,500 
(H hr.) 



Jubilee. U.S.A. 
(8-9) 
Wmsn i 
(Evans A l 
Hill Bm. i 

Carter (Bates) 
Mu-L $1!.50C 
(4 hr. 



Perry Mason 

Sterling [DFS 

Oulf (YAR) 

Hamm I U 

Colgate 
Van Heusen 



"Perry Como 

(8-9) 

Klmberley Clark 

( FCAB) 
RCA A Whirlpool 

(KAK) 
Chmatmd (DDB) 
V-L $120. 0»« 



Price Is Right 

Lever (JWT) 
Speldel (NOJfcK) 
Q L $21,500 



The Real 
McCoys 

Sylvania (JWT) 
PAG (Compton) 
Sc-F $36,000 



Derringer 

S. C Johnson 

I NUB) 

W-F $4*.»»0 



Oldsmobile 
Music Theater 
OldimobllelBro ) 
V-F $40,000 



Walt Disney 

Hill Bros. (Ayer) 

' Pulp 

N CftK) 

Reynolds Metal 

( Lennon A 

Newell) 



Rawhide 

Gulf OAK 
Allied Vans 

. \1 

Amateur Hour 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 

(5/1 S) 



Ellery Queen 



(ubilee. USA 

I Vrguson 
(NLAB) 



Wanted Dead 

or Alive 
Urn A Wmson 

ilea) 
Bristol -Myers 
(DCSA3) 
W P $S9.00< 



Polaroid (DDB) 

Sunbeam 

(IVrrln Paus) 

Notzema 

SSCcUB) 

Am Dairy (C-M) 



« 



000 



Milton Berle 
Kraft (JWT) 

CL $50,000 

Bob Hope 

Bulck i Mo E> 

(9-10; 4/15) 

V-L $250,000 



Pat Boone 

Chevy 

Showroom 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

V-L $45,000 



Zane Cray 
S. C. Johnson 

■N"I,AI!> alt 

General Foods 

(BAB) 

W-F $45,000 



Laugh Line 

(4/16 S) 

Amer Home 

(Bates) 

Q-L $21,000 



Tombstone 
Territory 

(YAR) 
\l .irrls 
(Burnett) 
W-F 



Phil Silvers 
R J. ReynoJM 

Behlck i BAB) 
Sc-F $42,000 



M Squad 

Amer. Tobac. 

9SCAB) 

Bulova (Mc-E) 
My F $31,000 



Lawrence Wclk 

(9-10) 
Dodge (Grant) 
Mu-L $17,500 
(H hr.) 



Cale Storm 
(L 4/11) 

Houston) 

Lever (JWT) 

Sc-F $39,50C 

Face of Dangei 

sust (4/18 S) 



Black Saddle 

I. A U 

alt 
Colgate Mc-Ki 
« r $37.0<K 



Bat Masterson 

Kraft IT WD 
Saaltest I JUT) 
W-F $38,000 



Rough Riders 

P Ixirlllard 

(LAN) 

W-F $47.000t 



Playhouse 90 

(9:30-11) 

Amer Gas 

LAN) alt 

Kimberly-Clark 

(FCAB) 
Dr-LAF $45,000 
(H hr.) 



Ford Show 

Ford (JWT) 

CV-L $38,000 



77 Sunset Stri( 

(9:30-10:30) 

Amer. Chicle 

(Bates) 

My F $72.00( 



Playhouse 

Lux (JWT) alt 

ScbUU (JWT) 

Dr-F $38,000 



The Thin Man 

Colgate 

(Bates) 
My-F $40,000 



Lawrence Wclk 



Have Cun. Wil 

Travel 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

alt Lever 1WT 

W V $38,001 



Cimarron City 
(9:30-10 301 
Mennen iWAL 
PAO 

\\ I' $30.00< 

(H hr.l 



This Is Your 

Life 

PAO (BAB) 

D-L $52,000 



This Is Music 
sust 



Playhouse 90 

Allstate 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Ansco (BAB) 



You Bet Your 
Life 

Tonl (North) 
Lever (JWT) 
l-L $51,750 



77 Sunset Stri| 

Carter Prod. 

i Bates) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

Harold Ritchie 

(KAE) 



The Line Up 

PAO lYAUi 

My-F $34,000 

Cene Kelly 

Pontile M.J A \ 

(9:30-10:30; 

4/24) 

Mil, $125,000 



Cavalcade of 

Sports 

Gillette (Maxon) 

(10-concl) 
Sp-L $45,000 



Sammy Kaye 

Show 

Manhattan Shin 

(Peck) 



Cunsmoke 

I.AM DFS) all 

Sperry Rind 

i YAR) 

« f $46.00) 



Cimarron City 
Bulova 

'Hind 

H. Curtis (Weiss 
Cons. Clgirs 

LAN 



Emmy Awards 

PAG (YAR) 
Benrus (Gray) 
(10-11:30; 5/6) 



John Daly News 
Lorllltrd (LAN) 
N-L $6,000 



No net service 



Playhouse 90 

R 1 Reynolds 

(E«ty) 

Elgin (JWT) 

L 4 IT) 

II Curtis 

1/23 S 



Masquerade 

Party 

Lorllltrd (LAN) 

• It 

Hizel Bishop 

(Specter) 

Q-L SI* "in 



John Daly 

Lorillard 

N-L 



New: 
LAN) 
$6.00( 



No net service 



Person to 

Person 

P. Lorillard 

(LAN) 

alt Revlon 

(WarAL) 

I-L $38,000 



Phillies Jackpot 

Bowling 
Bayuk (Wermen 

A Schorr) 
Sp-L $3,000 



Markham 

I * - 

schiitz rwn 

My-F $39.00( 



DA's Man 

' A V Mc-E) 

A I" S3J 004 



A, (P) Film. (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile. (I,) Live. (M) Misc, 

Music. (My) Mystery \ | News. (Q) Quiz-Panel. (Sc) Situation 

dy. (Sp) Sports. (V) Variety. ,W) Western. tNo charge for repeats 



L preceding date means last date on air. S following date means starting 
date for new show or sponsor in time slot. 



■ Nm>K 



11 APRIL l ( ).i«) 



i: 



summertradio goes 







y^g^s wR/vf feg» 






where the family goes 




SPOT RADIO is the most effective 
summer medium you can use because 
Radio goes where the family goes. 

Reach people- wherever they are, 
at home or on vacation -with SPOT 
RADIO. 




SPONSORED BY MEMBER FIRMS OF 



Avery-Knodel Inc. — John Blair & Company — Broadcast Time Sales 

Thomas F. Clark Co. Inc. — Harry E. Cummings — Robert E Eastman & Co. Inc. 

H-R Representatives Inc. — The Katz Agency Inc. — McGavren-Quinn Company 

The Meeker Company Inc. — Art Moore Associates Inc. — Richard O'Connell Inc. 

Peters. Griffin. Woodward. Inc. — William J. Reilly Inc. 

Radio-TV Representatives Inc. — Weed Radio Corporation — Adam Young Inc. 



10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 
11:00 
11:15 
11:30 



11:45 



12:15 
12:30 
12:45 



DAYTIME 



C O 




P A I 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Lamp Unto My 
Feet 



Look Up & Live 
sust 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS NBC 



Arthur Codfrey 
Standard Brands 



Morning 
Playhouse 

sust 
On The Co 

sust (4/27 S) 



Dough Re Mi 

Congoleum Nairn 



Treasure Hunt 



P&G alt 

Lever 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS 



NBC 



Arthur Codfrey 

Hover alt 
Gem Mills 



Morning 
Playhouse 

sust 
On The Co 
ust [4/28 S] 



Lib by alt sust 



Dough Re Mi 
sust 



Treasure Hunt 
Culver all 
Gold Seal 



Frlgidaire alt 
Armour 






Eye On 
New York 



Love Lucy 
Lever alt 

■ust 
Gen Foods 
(L 3/23) 



Price Is Right 

Lever 

alt Ponds 

Sterling 

alt Whitehall 



Love Lucy 
Lever 



sust 
alt Gen Foods 



Price Is Right 
Lever alt 
Sunshine 



Stand Brands 



Camera Three 

sust 



Top Dollar 
Colgate 



Concentration 
Culver alt 

Lever 



Armour 

alt Lever 



Top Dollar 
Colgate 



Concentration 



- 



Lever alt 
Alberto Culver 



Bishop Pike 

sust 



The Last Word 

sust 



George Hamil- 
ton IV 



Love of Life 

sust 

Amer Home Prod 

alt Block Drug 



Tic Tac Dough 
Ponds alt 
Golds eel 



George Hamil- 
ton IV 
partic 



Love of Life 

Toni ill 



Tic Tac Dough 
Stand Brands 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



Amer Home 



Saarrh Fnr 



George . 
ton 

i 



I I Cuu l U i i 
You 

Culver alt 
sust 
Armour alt P&G 



|ohns Hopkins 
File 7 



Face the 

Nation 

sust 



Play Your 
Hunch 

partic 



It Could Be You 
Whitehall 



Cuiding Light 
P&G 



Ponds alt P&G 



Play Your 
Hunch 

partic 



Tomorrow 
P&G 



Al. 



Guiding Light 
P&G 



"nV 



College News 
Conference 

sust 



Frontiers of 
Faith 



Music Bingo 
partic 



No net service 



News 
(1:25-1:30) 

sust 



No net service 



Music Bingo 
partic 



No net service 



News 
(1:25-1:30) sust 



No net service 



World Turns 
P&G 



Leo Durocher's 
Warmup 

sust 



No net service 



World Turns 
P&G 



Sterling alt 
Miles 



No net service 



I 



Baseball Game 
of the Week 

(2 to concl.) 

various sponsors 

(4/12 S) 



Major League 
Baseball 

Phillies Cigars 

(V2 network) 
Anheuser-Busch 



Day In Court 

partic 



|immy Dean 

sust 



Queen for a 
Day 

Congoleum Nairi 



Day In Court 

partic 



Jimmy Dean 

Llbby alt sust 

Mtlw 

alt Tonl 



Queen for a 

Day 

sust 

Culver 

it 28 S) 



Day If 







I ' \ regional) 
National Brewini 

{Va regional) 

Genesee Brewin 

[% New York) 



Cale Storm 
Show 

partic 



aft Linkiener 

Stand Brands 
alt Lever 



Haggis Baggis 

sust 



Art 



Standard Brands 
Van Camp 



Gale Storm 
Show 
parti 




Haggis Baggis 
sust 



Open Hearing 

sust 



Beat The Clock 

partic 



Big Payoff 

Colgate 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



Beat The Clock 
pai I Lc 



Big Payoff 

sust 



Varrfirt Is Ynun 



Young 

Dr. Malone 

T&G alt Nabisco 



fceat 7i l 



No net servic 



Who Do You 
Trust? 



Verdict is toui 
Stand Brands 

Amer Home 
alt Lever 



From These 
Roots 
P&G 



Who Do You 
Trust? 
parti 



Gen Mills 

alt Carnation 

Swift 

alt Tonl 

B righter Pay 



From These 
Roots 
P&G 



Who I 
Tn 



No net servic 



Wisdom 

sust 



American 
Bandstand 

Lever 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 
Amer Home Pro< 



1 ruth 6r 

Consequences 

Ponds 

alt Sterling 

P&G 



American 
Bandstand 

Lever. Carter 



P&G 



Secret Storm 
Gen MlUs 
alt Quaker 



Truth or 

Consequences 

Standard Brands 



No net service 



Behind The 
News 



American 

Bandstand 

Gaylord Prod 



Edge of Night 
P&G 



County Fair 

sust 

Sterling 

alt Lever 



American 

Bandstand 

Hollywood Candy 

Gillette 



Edge of Night 
PAG 

Sterling 

alt Miles 



County Fair 



art alt 
Lever 



Am 
Bia« 

am 
nit* 



Paul Winche 

II. ,ii/. nit 

Ceil Mill 



Came of 

Politics 

sust 



Omnibus 
(5-6 alt wks) 

-list 



Amirican 

Bandstadn 

co-op 



American 

Bandstand 

co-op 



Lone Ranger 
Gen Mills 

Cracker Jack 
Kritos Co. 



MM 

Kaleidoscope 
(5-0 alt wks) 
Polai 
alt sust 



Mickey Mouse 

Club 

Sweets Co. 

Bristol-Myers 



a 



M*h» 



Walt Disney's 
Adventure Time 



NOTE: At prcsstimc, ABC TV had not rescheduled Operation Daybreak clients following a number of program revisions 



HOW TO USE SPONSORS 
NETWORK TELEVISION 

COM PARAGRAPH 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages I 16, 47) 
includes regularly scheduled programing 11 \pr. to 
8 May, inclusive (with possible exception of changes 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sclied- 



1 


G 


R 


A 


P 


H 


11 APR.- 


8 MAY. 


INESDAY 

F NBC 


THURSDAY 

^fi£ crs NRr. 


FRIDAY 

^BC ms nbc 


SATURDAY 


■ 

• 
kCo 

l SI 


Dough Re Mi 

fUlt 




Morning 
Playhouse 

suit 

On The Co 

lull . 1 90 8) 


Dough Re Mi 

• Ull 

i 

ni\ 




Morning 
Playhouse 

On The Co 
mil .1 8) 


Dough Re Mi 
suit 

Armour 
ililsro 




Captain 
Kangaroo 
Hint 


Howdy Doody 

<*ital 
Baking 


Cfrey 
•» 1 


Treasure Hunt 

suit 

ill n-iu.> 

Corn Prod 

til P&G 




Arthur Codfrcy 

■ usl 

Standard Brtnds 


Treasure Hunt 

• 

-Ulalre 
I'&G 
alt Heinz 




Arthur Godfrey 

I s Steal 

tit luit 

•Ult 


Treasure Hunt 
Gen Mills ilt 

lull 
Whitehall all 

Sterling 




Eighty Mouse 

Gen Poodi all 

Colgate 


Ruff & Reddy 

Oen Foods 
alt Man 




Price Is Right 
Krlgldalre 

Sterling 
II. in/, tit 
I* roil 




1 Love Lucy 
Lever 


Price Is Right 

Al. Culver 
alt \xnm Itrt.s 

MIlesTlf 
B E 1 




1 Love Lucy 

1 . . i alt 
s C -Inhnson 


Price Is Right 
Lever alt 
Corn Prod 

Stand B 

Gen Mills 


Jncli Al Showl 

(11-121 
Cailonal Biscuit 


leckle & leckle 
Swift alt iuil 

Gen Mllli 


Fury 
Borden 

Poodi 




Soil t 




■11 1 >. m 


1 4r 

m 


Concentration 

Helnx >lt MIIm 

Nabisco alt 

Armour 




Top Dollar 
Colette 


Concentration 

alt I. ever 
Heinz tit 
Whitehall 




Top Dollar 
Colgate 


Concentration 
Pondi alt 

It-iuer & Black 
Lever alt 
Gold s,-ul 


Jncle Al Show 


Adventures of 
Robin Hood 

■ Ult 


Circus Boy 
Man all 

lull 




Colgate alt luit 


Aft 

*roJ 


Tic Tac Dough 

llelnz alt 
'Ollgolein 

P&Q 


Ccorgc Hamil- 
ton IV 
partlc 


Love of Life 
Scott tit sust 
Amer Hume 


Tic Tac Dough 

Al. Culver 

alt Heinz 

P&Q 


Ceorgc Hamil- 
ton IV 


Love of Life 
Atlantis 
all sust 


Tic Tac Dough 
Gen Mllli all 

Sunshine 
P&G 






True Story 

iuil 


Lever alt 
Gen Mllli 


Sterling Drug 


« 


Could Be You 

Whitehall alt 

\. ille 

Cbrn Prod 

■It Brlllo 


Play Your 
Hunch 
panic 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 

Cuiding Light 

P&G 


It Could Be 
You 
Miles alt 
Nabli 

P&G 


Play Your 
Hunch 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 

Cuiding Light 

P&G 


Could Be You 

Stand ltraa.il 

ait Pondi 

P&G alt 

Corn Prod 






)etective Diary 
Sterling Drug 


luit 


ice 

• 


No net service 


Music Bingo 
partlc 


No net service 


No net service 


Music Bingo 


No net service 

News 
(1 :25-l:30> sust 


No net service 






Mr. Wizard 


News 

(1:25-1:30) sust 


No net service 




As the World 

Turns 

PAG 

Pillsbury 


No net service 




World Turns 

i\m; 


No net service 






Leo Durochcr's 
Warmup 


Swift 

alt Sterling 




L 


Queen for a 
Day 
nut 


Day In Court 
partlc 


limmy Dean 
Ijever tit 
Van Camp 


Queen tor a 
Day 

-ii-i 


Day In Court 
partic 


Jimmy Dean 
Lever alt BUil 

Gerber 
alt Sen Mills 


Queen for a 
Day 
aust 




Baseball Came 

of the Week 

various sponsors 

(2 to concl.) 


Major League 

Baseball 
Phillies Cigars 
at work) 


Brn & Wmsn 
alt Lever 


sust 


Klt'inert alt sust 


lit sust 


ter 


Haggis Baggis 
nut 


Calc Storm 
Show 
partlc 


Art Linkletter 
Kellogg 
Pillsbury 


Haggis Baggis 

sust 


Cale Storm 
Show 


Art Linkletter 

I>ever Bros 

Swift alt 

Sttley 


Haggis Baggis 
sust 

sust 






Anhruser-Busch 
i 'i regional) 


sust 


sust 


* 


Young 

Dr. Malone 

P&Q 

sust 


Beat The Clock 
partlc 


Big Payoff 
sust 


Young 

Dr. Malone 

P&G alt sust 

sust alt E.E.I. 


Beat The Clock 


Big Payoff 
Colgate 


Young 

Dr. Malone 

P&G 

V E I 








r 


From These 

Roots 
P&G tit sust 

sust 


Who Do You 
Trust? 


Verdict Is Yours 
Sterling alt Scott 

I.ibnv 
tit Scott 


From These 
Roots 
P&c, 
sust 


Who Do You 
Trust? 


Verdict Is Yours 

Gen Mills tit 

AllintlB 

Gen Mills 

alt Lever 


From These 

Roots 

P&G 

alt sust 










sust 


rav 


Truth or 
Consequences 
Corn Prod tit 

P&G 


American 

Bandstand 

5th Ave Candy 

Wrick 


brighter Day 
P&G 


Truth or 

Consequences 
P&G 

Culver a. i I'm; 


American 
Bandstand 


Brighter Day 
P&G 

Secret Storm 

Amer Home Prod 

tit Gen Mills 


Truth or 

Con-equenccs 

Whitehall alt 

Corn Prod 




Race of the 
Week 

Mil. • 






Secret Storm 

Scott tit 

Amer Home 


'im 


• ™l 


P&G 


F 


County Fair 
Frtgtdaire 

alt Gen Mills 
Heinz tit 
Sterling 


American 

Bandstand 

Gillette 

1 - 1 


Edge of Night 
i'.tn 

PuTsbury 


County Fair 

Heinz alt 

E.E.I. 

Lever 


American 
Bandstand 
Gen Mills 


Edge of Night 
P&G 

Amer Home 

tit 

Sterling 


County Fair 
Dixie 

alt sust 










i -alt 

9i 






American 

Bandstand 

co-op 






American 

Bandstand 

co-op 
















Walt Disney's 
Adventure Time 
Miles 
Interna- 






Mickey Mouse 

Club 

Gen Mllli 

Sweets P&G 






All-Star Coif 


Lone Ranger 
Nestle al; 
Gen Mllli 




Hi 

w 

an 
n.. 


programs 
ell. with air 
s not liste 

Monday F 


appear di 

dates. The 

d are: To 

riday, parti 


ring this 
■ only regul 
light. NBC 
cipating sp 


period art 
arly schedu 
. 11:15 p 
onsorship: 


! listed 
ed p ru- 
in. -1:00 
Sunday 


\ews Spec 
\\ lutehalli . 
partiripatin 
a.m.. Mi. ni ; 


al. CBS, S 

Today, M 

g : \fii j (' 

a\ -Fridaj . 


inila\ . 11-1 
$C, 7:00-9 :C 
BS, 7:45-8: 
All limes a 


1:1") p.m. 
II a.m.. M< 
00 a.m. ar 
e 1 astei n 


i arter and 

nday-Friila\ . 
id 8:45-9:00 
Standard. 



Topeka has 

1 TV Station 

WIBW-TVisit 



52 




WIBW-TV 




That's Why 

NOBODY FROM NOWHERE 

Can Saturate 

TOPEKA 

like 

WIBW-TV 

SATURATES TOPEKA 




ALL DAY- 
ANY DAY 

survey- proved WIBW-TV 
tops all competition! 

• WIBW-TV is the ONLY station in 
Topeka — the 2nd largest market in 
Kansas; 

• Serves 38 rich rural and urban 
counties (NCS//3) with 349,300 set 
count; 

Share of Audience 

In Area (NCS 3) 

7:45 am 12 N- 6 pm.- 

-12 N 6 00 p.m. Mid 

57.0% 50.3% 51.1% 

In Topeka (Nov. '58 ARB) 
33 9% 42.5% 38.0% 

• From sign-on to sign-off WIBW-TV 
has practically TWICE the audience 
of either the second or third sta 
tion that can be seen in metro- 
politan Topeka; (Nov. '58 ARB). 

• In the top 15 Once-A-We?k Shows, 
WIBW-TV had an avert ge rating 
of 37 69%. 

WIBW-TV 

CBS - NBC - ABC 

Channel 13 Topeka, Kansas 

Represented by 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 













National and regional buys 
in work now or recently complet 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, is prcpat ing schedules in 
top markets for its Lilt home permanent. The schedules start late this 
month for an indefinite run. I.D.'s during nighttime segments are 
being purchased; frequencies depend upon the market. The buyer is 
Dorothy Houghey; the agency is Grey Advertising Agency, Inc.. \. 



General Foods Corp., Jell-0 Division. White Plains. N. Y., is ent 
ing major markets for its Calumet Baking Powder. The schedul 
begin this month for six to eight weck>. depending upon the market 
Minutes during daytime periods are being placed; frequencies vd 
from market to market. The buyer is Bill Croke: the agency is Fool 
Cone & Belding, New York. 



et. 

: 

or 



Carter Products, Inc., New York, is lining up schedules in maj 
markets for its Arrid Whirbln deodorant. The campaign starts this 
month, runs for 26 weeks. Minutes during daytime segments are be- 
ing placed; frequencies depend upon the market. The Inner is Gr 
Sullivan; the agency is Ted Bates & Co.. New York. 

The Pharma-Craft Corp., Sub. of Jos. Seagram \ Son. Cranbui 
N. J., is planning a campaign in about 40 markets for its Fresh 
cream deodorant. The 15-week schedule begins 20 April. Minute 
and 20-second announcements during both daytime and nighttime 
slots are being purchased. The buyers are Mario Kircher and Carrie 
Senatore: the agency is J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

Esso Standard Oil Co., New York, is going into top markets will 

pre-sununer push lor its Ksso gasoline and oils. The schedules a 
short-term, begin 16 April. Minutes during traffic periods and \wvk 
ends are being used: frequencies \ar\ from market to market. I he 
buyer is Sy Goldis; the agem \ i- McCann-Eriekson. Inc.. New ^ " 



: 



Gerber Products Co., Fremont, Mich., is kicking nil a campaign 
maj oi markets for its Gerber's bab\ foods. The 10-week campaign 
starts this month. Minutes during daytime segments arc hci 
placed: frequencies depend upon the market. The Inner is 1 ran 
Velthuys; the agencj i> D'Arcj Advertising Co., New ^ ork 

General Foods Corp., Birds Eye l>i\.. While Plains, N. ^ .. is u 

tialing new schedules in major markets for it- Birds Eye fruits and 
vegetables. The schedules start tin- month, run for eight weeks. 
Minute- and 1. 1).'- during daytime segments arc being slotted; fre 
quencies van from market to market. The Inner is Lorraine I 
gicro: the agenc\ i- ^ <>ung \ Kubicam. Inc.. New York. 



MMINsdl! 



II \h;ii 191 




This is an apple 




This is an orange . . . 




They are different and cannot 
be compared. (Some people say 
the same thing about TV com- 
mercials and magazine ad pages.) 



Applesauce ! 




T 




Now you can compare 
magazine ad pages with 
TV commercials ! The new 
Saturday Evening Post 
study of Ad Page Exposure 
-conducted by Alfred 
Politz - actually measures 
the number of exposures 
to your ad page, gives you 
the first valid cost compar- 
ison of magazine and TV 
advertising exposures! 



One juicy comparison (for instance) 




Cost per thousand 
exposures to a black and 
white ad page in the 




9Qc 




Cost per thousand exposures 

(viewers) per minute commercial 

on the average nighttime 

network TV program: $1.96** 

Sticky corrolaries: 

What happens to your cost per thousand if your"top banana"slips? 
What if the viewer you buy goes out of the room for a kumquat 
during your commercial? 

'Based on the onetime cost of a full page, black and white, and exposures to readers 15 years of 
age and older. 

"Based on average net cost and homes reached for all nighttime network programs of $3.54 per 
thousand homes and an estimate of 1.8 viewers per set 16 years of age and older. 



sure as the good Lord 

made little green apples 

this much is a fact*: 




...yes, 29 million times 

each issue someone turns 

to your ad page in the rS j^^j 



*It's a fact and documented by age, by sex, by income, 

by education, by city-size, by geographic location, by 
all the health-giving information that allows you to 
plan for the most succulent return on your ad dollar. 











Ad Page Exposure 

goes smack to the core of your 
advertising effectiveness ! 
See it! Study it ! It will do things 
for your advertising campaigns! 



S M AC AZ1NE 



Ad Page Exposure 
. . . pioneered by 




I 



ANDREA 

i Cont'd from page 39) 

strong enough to keep him <m the 
1 1 ack w hile he - looking. 

" li umpeting a qualit} -im v alone 
won' I work. \ml conditioning is a 
subtle thing, too. I p to this point. 
Andrea's advertising had been en- 
lin-lv in print, hut t\ set claims sound 
too much the same in print. The con- 
viction and persona] enthusiasm of 
tin spoken voice have a better condi- 
tioning effect. I hcv also create a 
mail and phone response which helps 
guage tin 1 market and ii> receptive- 
iit- — quickl) .' 

In working mil a broadcast sched- 
ule (after radio was picked to do the 
major jol>i another consideration 
had to be weighed. Sa\s Hirschberg, 
\\ i had a feeling that the so-called 
qualit) market exists elsewhere than 
in higher-income or meticuloush 
educated groups. ITiere's a strong 
imitative factor in the market for 
pialilv products, and a dixerse sched- 
ule i- called for." 

Account executive David A. Neu- 
maii outlines the buj - and the balance 
of appeals: 

• For the "good music lover": 

n QXR, Vew York. Fifteen 60- 

BKond spot- per week immediately 
preceding and following the Neivs 
on The Hour. 

The ('oncer! \ clitoris. Twelve 60- 
second spots per week on WNCN. 
New York; WBCN, Boston: WHCN. 
Hartford: \\\CY Providence— all 
fm station-. 

// CRB, Boston (AM & FM). Two 
half hour musical programs per week: 
Ihursday, 8-8:30 p.m.; Saturday. 
|p:15-ll p.m. Six (>0's. scheduled one 
per afternoon. Mon. through Sat. 

• For that segment of the quality 
market in the "upgrading" throes: 

1* Ml. A. Vew York: harry Gray 
mow, one five-minute newscast, five 



nights a week, at I I :30 p.m. \n 

opening and closing lag phi- (ill 5© 

onds of commercial in the middle ol 

the new-. 

Meanwhile in the print media 

Esquire was allotted one column pei 
month; the Vea )<>//, Times \faga 
tine, 3 5 page black-and-white once 
a month. 

Hie quality, custom-made, perform- 
ance and pleasure copj points were 
i ommon to all copj . Telephone aw\ 
postcard requests i" the factor) for 

dealer lists were suggested. \ 50-60 
card response was noted at the out- 
set, continuing for some time. 

On radio, dealer- were able to 
lake advantage of dealer tags at the 
cm\ ol the -pots, \lioiii 25 dealers in 
New A oik and a like number in 

Boston are doing llii-. Monev i- co- 
oped with the sales manager in each 
distribution area. 

\l tii-i eop\ balance was almost 

>(i-~>il for stereo and l\. Neunian re- 
ports, luii when the response showed 
an overwhelming stereo preference, 
the stereo emphasis was cut hack to 

1(>' ! until production could catch up. 
I his immediate reaction showed 

\ndrea lie could not <>nl\ step-up 

stereo production but could safelv 

introduce a second stereo model as 
well. Since the beginning of the 
campaign last September, he has in- 
troduced two new stereo models and 
one new Iv model. 

In all. \ndrca feels he has been 
able to: 

• Maintain price stability. 

• Maintain parallel sales and vol- 
ume increase-. 

• Condition consumers to his fran- 
chise setup. 

• Give dealers a tool for measur- 
ing response. 

Frank \. I). Vndrea chose to spe- 
i Please turn to page 66 I 



POST AD STIRS TV CRITICISM 

The Satunla\ Kvcning Post <id <tt left {and on preceding 
pages) is challenged 63 many tv men. Rend rebuttal l>\ 
exec. 1 .p. George Huntington of TvB in next neck's issue 
oj SPONSOR, and turn to page 10 in this issue for <i dis- 
cussion in Commercial Commentary. 



SPONSOR • 11 APRIL 1959 






"JAXIE" says... 
LESTOIL 

C'lo.lllS up willi Spots 

lib 




I.esloil has joined the Honoi Roll 

of \dvei h-n - u ho i hose WFGA- 
T\ to earrv it- sales messages to 
more than a quai in -million Flori- 
da-( Georgia I \ homes. 

Ileavv -pol -aliiralioii i- being 
used to introduce I estoil in this 
new market and these spots 
combined with WFGA-TV's top 
programming will pro\ ide 

strong selling power for Lestoil - 
fine all-purpose liquid detergent. 

"Jaxie" is proud to have Lestoil 
and the Jack-on Vssoi iates, Inc. 
advertising agencv on its growing 
list of prestige ailv ei ti-ei -. 

NBC and ABC Programming 
Represented nationally by Peters. 
Griffin, Woodward. Inc. 



WFGA-TV 

Channel 12 

Jacksonville, Florida 



FLORIDA'S 
COLORFUL STATION 



01 



With more stress on male preferences, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What constitutes a good man's 



With male audiences increasing 
in importance for many of to- 
day's advertisers, experts examine 
basic appeals for men's programs. 

Tom Villante, sports director. Batten, 
Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc., New York 

The best way to reach and sell 
men through the medium of television 
is by buying sports shows and action 
shows. This has been true since the 
innovation of television. 

An advertiser can buy full or half 
sponsorship of a top sporting event 
and get excellent male exposure, a 
fair cost efficiency, and prestige. He 
also establishes an important asso- 
ciation for his product which creates 
a loyaltj influence among his male 
viewers. And don't sell this loyalty 
factor short! This is the intangible 
which always has made sports shows 
a good television buy. It was treason 
for a Dodger fan to smoke any other 
cigarette but Lucky Strike or drink 
anything but Schaefer beer! 



Excellent 
exposure 
through sports 
shows 



The most popular method of reach- 
ing today's male market is with the 
combination form, namely, buying 
into sports shows | >l u> good action 
shows — usually of the western or pri- 
vate eye types. Another approach is 
the television spot campaign in and 
around sports and action shows. 

To sum up, all action shows are 
good but sports are a particularly 
good wa) of motivating the male 
audience. Sports shows generally 
pull large audiences, so you get good 
exposure. 

The cost efficiency is nol as good 
as it was. hut possibb film buys 



62 




would tend to mitigate this difficulty. 
And finally, and this is extremely 
important, sports shows have a strong 
prestige factor. The sponsor's prod- 
uct is intimately associated with the 
nation's greatest contemporary heroes. 
What better implied endorsement or 
testimonial can a sponsor ask for? 

Harry Wismer, sports broadcaster, 
Sport Thrills (if the Century show, 
New York 

Naturally, it is well known that 
men, by and large, prefer action 
shows. However, in my experience, 
one type of action show looms head 
and broad shoulders above any other 
kind. Men prefer the type of action 
that they themselves can identify 
with. In other words, real action, 
not the fictionalized variety. 

Western action is fiction, and so 
are detective dramas. This is not to 
say that they do not offer many 
solid entertaining values. But all fic- 
tion that the man cannot deeply iden- 
tify with is quickly forgotten. West- 
erns don't produce the impact and 
empathj that is the result of real 
action. 

What is real action? 

Sports action, of course. Sports 
action is out of real life. It is con- 
temporary. It concerns real people 
whom the man has known or known 
about for years, whose lives he's fol- 
lowed in the newspapers, magazines 
and on radio and t\ sports shows. 

The average man cannot identif\ 
with motion picture or l\ stars. Their 
li\es arc too different ; thej live in 
dilferent worlds. But spoil* are close 
to the lives ol almost everj man. He 
has participated in a varietj of sports 
a~ a boy, and main still engage in 
some sports when the) are older. 

Sports and sporl heroes arc w ithin 
the realm ol any mans projection of 

himself. 

These athletes are the true heroes 
of the average man: the men he has 

most identified with both as child and 




Emphasis on 

sports action 
and sports 
heroes 









man; the kind of heroes most men 
daydream of being. 

My current sports series, Harry 
Wismer' s Sports Thrills of the Cen- 
tury is an interesting case in point. 
Each week I introduce films of the 
greatest and most unusual events in 
sport history, covering every phase 
in the recent history of athletic con- 
tests. Actually, this series is a dis- 
tillation of the greatest moments in 
sports, and the producers and imself 
edited thousands of feet of sponj 
films and newsreels. 

These films invoke another ingre- 
dient of a good man's show : Nos- 
talgia. Some of the films like the 
Walter Johnson Story, the Red 
Grange story, the 1920 Olympiog 
bring back pleasant memories and 
associations to the male audience. 
They turn the man's thoughts to the 
happy days of his \ outh, when he 
was free of care and worries. A 
man's first ideals — the sports heroes 
of his youth — are among the most 
pleasant subjects for an action show- 
imaginable. 

While men enjo) all good action 
shows, it is sports action that pro- 
duces the most enduring values for 
-ponsors. 



Raymond K. Maneval, ' ■/'• '" charge 
ol methodology; Scherwin Research Corp.. 
Veto ) ork 
The stead) urbanization of the 
American male, and the gradual 
womanization of American culture, 
are necessarih reflected in entertain- 
ment. Entertainment of all types has 
.hanged in keeping with this pattern, 
and toda\ the gulf between what a 



SI'ONSOlt 



1 I VPRIL 1959 



show? 



THANKS 






man might want to see mi television 
ami the actual choices available is a 
wide one. 

I nder these conditions, it would 
Mem thai the ad\ertiser seeking a 
male audience should not go half- 
wax. He should present entertain* 
Bent that is Franklj male and nol 
make the mistake of neutralizing it. 
If he wants a strict!) male audience. 

In this was he will gain the honest 
byaltj of the viewers to both the 
program and product. 

Spmts programs are the only kind 
(it entertainment that are much better 
liked l>\ men than women, and rep- 
resent a good cost-circulation *'l>u\." 
Straight dramatic and mysterj shows 
(especiall) those of the private-eye 

type) tend to sit well with male view- 
8rs, but often are not as boldly male 
a- the) should be. Westerns have a 
dual appeal, attracting, on the aver- 
age. both men and women about 
equally. 

Sponsors who wish a mixed audi- 



Programing 

that is 
frankh mule 



ence often lose male viewers with an 
entertainment slant thai i- too femi- 
nine. Situation comedies, with their 
emphasis on women, do not do as 
well as a class as the more strenuous 
t\pc of show. There are naturalK 
exceptions to the rule. Uso, ipii/ 
-how- tested bj Schwerin Research 
Corp. were consistently better liked 
Bj women. The least appealing to 
men- tastes is the musical variety 
show, though, again, there are ex- 
ception-. 

In general. I'd sa) the best t\pe of 
male programing is that which is 
strong and dominant!) masculine.^ 









'4R/ETY 



March 18, 1959 



*j.ome 

ibutions 

avy hail 

orth on 

yet u»- 

. $50,000 

A\of... Ken 

.heir "Dee- 

.tests for do- 



nm&nds cor- 

is going on 

•fi, io run for 

move from 

to the air- 

wiU break 

-,e to Mrs. 

tati radio 

rp. An- 

K-ords in 

rai Man- 

arrange- 



L?e at ABC- 

> Freddie" 

e account 

mage re- 

umer-up 



' : Zorrcs' : 



PROFILES IN CRIME 

With Joe Julian, Mason Adams, 

narrators, others 
Director: Howard Phillips 
Writer: Walter Wager 
2r> Mins., Mon., 10:.'J."> p.m. 
WMCA, N.Y. 

Walter Wager, formerly with 
CBS Public Affairs, has come up 
with a very good radio series on 

U.S. racketeers, their methods and 
their history. 

Profile on Frank Costello was to 
the point, provocative and terrible 
in some of its implications, espe- 
cially Costello's tieup with politi- 
cians. The Wager package broad- 
cast by N.Y Indie WMCA consists 
of 13 episodes, each segment con- 
centrating on a particular hood, 
Lucky Luciano, Frankie Carbo, et 
al. Judging from the Costello 
episode, series is in the best tradi- 
tion of public service. 

Joe Julian narrated the Costello 
segment ably. He and Mason 
Adams alternate in the narration 
chores. Sen. Kefauver, a racket- 
buster of distinction, came in for 
an effective "beep" interview. 

Horo. 



for giving wmca's 
Public Affairs 
Department a pat on 
the back . . . 



the atav. 1 
torled ru 
/iewer. 



\ 

Local upj 
Skillful can 
Ington teiev 
act of over' 
caused a 
here to i 
ation to 
tices. 

"We 
Powell, 
against 
founded, 
ting s bl. 

The ass* 
eial board 
customers 
lion." hes 
aboul 75? 
pair indu 

Those 
firsl mes 
trtct o* 
contrr 
prad 



wmca 



570 KC-The Voice of New York 



SPONSOR • 11 vi'KIL 1959 



63 




RATINGS: TOP SPO 



Top 10 shows in 10 markets 
Period: 1-8 February, 1959 


National 
average 


7-STATION 
MARKETS 


6-STA. 
MARKET 


5-STA 
MARKET 


4- STATION MARKETS 





f 


TITLE, SYNDICATOR, SHOW TYPE 


N.Y. 


LA. 


S. Fran. 


Seattle 


Chicago 


Detroit 


Mil. Mnpls. Phila 


Wash. 


Atlanta 


Bait. Boston 


Sea Hunt 

*'v (Adventure) 


19.7 


22.8 

wcbs-tv 

in : 


10.4 

kcra 
10 :00pm 


25.9 

kron-tv 

7:00pm 


17.2 

klng-tv 
10:00pm 


20.5 

wnbq 
9:30pm 


25.9 

wjbk-tv 

10:30pm 


16.0 19.5 18.2 

wlsn-tv wtcn-tv wcau-tv 
9:00pm 9:00pm 7:00pm 


7.5 

ivmal t\ 
10:00pm 


13.4 

wsb-tv 
H 30pm 


165 9.9 

wbal-tv whdh-t» 
10 :30pml0 :30pm | 


Highway Patrol 

Ilv (Adventure) 


19.6 


13.4 

III II IV 

: OOpm 


9.7 

kttv 
7 :30pm 


20.5 

kron-tv 
6 30pm 


17.5 

komo-tv 
7:00pm 


19.3 

wen ii 
9 :30pm 


23.2 

wjbk-tv 
7:00pm 


18.2 19.2 

kstp-tv wrcv-tv 
9:30pm 10 :30pm 


17.5 

wtop tv 
7:00pm 


23.3 

9:00pm 


14.3 21.5 

wmar-tv n 

7:00pm 7 pm 


Death Valley Days 

u.s. borax (Western) 


19.3 


11.8 

wrca-tv 

7:00pm 


12.7 

krca 

7 :00pm 


8.5 

ktm 
7 :30pm 


19.2 

king-tv 
7:00pm 


11.5 

wgn-tv 
i 30pm 


21.2 

wwj-tv 

; iiiipm 


13.0 26.5 20.5 

wisn-tv wcco-tv wrcv-tv 

9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 


14.5 

wrc-tv 

; ii 


17.2 

II - 1 1 - 1 1 
: 00pm 


25.0 17.9 

wjz-tv Uli/ ti 
7:30pm 10 30pm 


Silent Service 

cnp (Adventure) 


18.8 


5.4 

lipix 

9:30pm 


8.4 

krca 
7:00pm 


15.2 

kron-tv 
7:00pm 


17.5 

king-tv 
10 :00pm 


18.2 

lltlliq 

9 in 




19.2 

wfil-tv 

6:30pm 


17.5 

wmal-tv 
7:00pm 


17.5 

wlw-a 
: OOpm 


14.3 21.9 

wbal-tv wbz-tv a 
10:30pm 7:00pm 1 


.: 


Whirlybirds 

<:bs (Adventure) 


17.6 


2.5 

« 1 1 i X 

- 


8.2 

khj-tv 
: 30pm 






10.9 

UlMl II 
Ill 




35.2 9.2 9.2 

wtmj-tv kstp-tv wcau-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 12 noon 


13.5 

wtop-tv 
7:00pm 


30.5 

7 :00pm 


19.3 20.9 ! 

wjz-tv wbz-tv ■ 
I'lOpm ■ 


Twenty-Six Men 

abc ( Western ) 


17.5 


4.7 

krca 

■ . niipm 




17.9 

komo-tv 

6:30pm 


11.5 

wgn-tv 

- -n 


10.9 

l\ w/ l\ 

7:00pm 


12.5 

wisn-tv 
8:30pm 


19.5 

wmal-tv 


9.2 

uivv-a 

: 00pm 


21.2 

7 ""pm 


;: 


MacKenzie's Raiders 

ii v (Adventure) 


17.0 


13.9 

WcllS-I.V 

8:00pm 


8.7 

kttv 
8:00pm 


10.2 

kpix 

7 :00pm 


18.2 

komo-tv 
6:30pm 


21.2 

wnbq 

'' .iiipni 


17.2 

wxyz ii 

: unpin 


9.0 17.2 

wisn-tv kstp-tv 
9:30pm 9:30pm 


12.2 

wtop-tv 
7:30pm 


9.3 

wbal-tv 
7:00pm 


State Trooper 

"c« (Adventure) 


16.3 


20.6 

»Tca-h 
in 30pm 


4.2 

khj-tv 
S :00pm 


11.9 

kgo-tv 
9:30pm 


4.2 

klnt-tv 
8:30pm 


15.2 

ivgn ii 
•i 30pm 


6.2 

.kin t\ 
10:00pm 


24.2 20.5 19.9 

iilllil l\ k-lp-ti lllri IV 

9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 


7.9 

wmal-tv 
10:00pm 


9.2 

ivaga-tv 

7 :30pra 


13.8 14.2 , 

wbal-tv wnac-tw I 
7:00pm 1 




Popeye 

"** (Comedy) 


16.2 


10.6 

wpix 

6:00pm 


12.6 

ktla 
6:00pm 


12.9 

kron-tv 

5:00pm 


6.5 

ktnt-tv 
5:30pm 




21.0 

cklw-tv 

ii 


9.3 20.7 27.0 

wisn-tv wcco-tv wfil-tv 
12:00pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 


12.6 

wttg 
6:30pm 


15.7 

wsb-tv 

" i 


23.0 




Mike Hammer 

«c* (Mystery) 


16.0 


20.3 

ii rca ii 
10 :30pm 


9.9 

krca 
10:30pm 


14.2 

kron-tv 
10:30pm 


19.5 

king-tv 
10:00pm 


12.9 

wgn-tv 
9 30pm 


9.2 

cklw-tv 

9 :00pm 


5.5 

wcco-tv 
10:30pm 


14.5 

wri-tv 
i" 10pm 


7.9 

n lw - a 
11:00pm 


19.9 II 

wnac-tf ■ 

r '"ipm J 




Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 mi 


irketi 




















r 


Special Agent 7 

mca i \d\entiire i 


17.3 








10.5 

HWJ-tV 

7:00pm 


14.3 

hi/ ii 

9:30pm 


. 


Cray Chost 

cbs (Adventure) 


16.2 


3.9 

wpU 
6 30pm 






9.9 

wgn-tv 

phi 






15.9 

wrc-tv 

7 :00pm 




25.2 

7:00pm jj 




Boots and Saddles 

CNP (Western) 


15.5 








11.2 

Wllbq 

pm 


4.5 

cklw-tv 
10:00pm 




10.5 

ii rc-tv 
6:00pm 




19.9 1 

uiiac-tv 
6 :00pm 3 


Frontier 

cn p (Western) 


14.9 




9.9 

kgO- li 
li :30pm 






3.0 

wwj-tv 

11:30pm 


11.5 

mil tl 
5 :00pm 








Divorce Court 

guild (Drama) 


13.9 


4.2 

wpli 
10:00pm 


12.2 

kttv 
1 ■ ■ in 


16.8 
kron n 

Mmii 


24.7 

klng-tv 
8:00pm 


13.5 

w jhk-tv 
7:00pm 


11.8 
whilh-tv 




Honeymooners 

CBS (Comedy) 


13.5 


5.0 

wplj 

S IOpd 


13.7 

k II XT 

6 11 


16.2 

kron-tv 
7:00pm 




6.9 

wgn-tv 

9 ii 




5.9 

km-p t\ 

- "Pin 








Clencanncn 

NT* II ,,,,,,-, |\ 1 


13.0 


4.9 

kttv 
- op, 


11.9 

kron-tv 
hi 30pm 


14.2 

king-tv 

10:00i>in 








Casey Jones 

SCREEN GEMS | \ , | v , .„ | , , , ,. | 


12.8 


4.4 

km 
7:30pm 


6.2 

kpli 
l :00pm 




7.2 

wgn-tv 

10pm 




5.5 

witl-tv 
6:00pm 


5.5 

wtop t\ 
1 1 2 noon 


18.9 


Jim Bowie 

*■■<= ' Vdventure > 


12.6 


5.8 

nmew n 
in OOpm 






4.9 

wnbq 
10pm 




6.5 18.9 

kni-p ii urn li 
- 1 i m. 7:00pm 


13.9 

II III 

7:(VOpm 


18.3 

wjz-tv 
5:00pm 


Big Story 

flamingo (Drama) 


12.3 


1.5 

men ti 
- i0pm 




12.2 

kiro ti 


12.5 

wttj 

Ol 


24.2 

ii.ii:.i ti 

in : i 


11.2 

wbi t» 

i pi 





Films listed arc syndicated, hi hr , Vfe hr and hr. length, telecast In four or more markets. The avcrago rating Is an unweighted average of Individual market ratings listed sbovBjg 

larkot 2-9 JaJl Whili mi iii im.ws aro fairly stnble from one month to another in markets in which they are shown, this Is true J^ 
Hilt ihould be borne In mind when analyzing rating trends from one month to another in this chart Classification as to number 



I ILM SHOWS 







J-STAT 


ION MARKETS 




2-STAT 


ION MARKETS 






Clevi 


Columbi 


sNrw Or. 


St. Limit 


Bum 


Dayton 


Prov. 




5 


19.5 

wjw-tv 
7 :00pm 


27.9 


28 9 

lnvl (V 

g 30pm 


23.5 

km 


28.8 

wbrc- lv 


27.5 

vvlw-d 
10:30pm 


19 5 

wpro-tv 
7:00pm 


m 


2 

- m 

5 


10.2 

7 :30pm 


22.2 

ubns-tv 


21.5 

ndsu-tv 

in 00pm 




37.3 


21 3 

uhi.i tv 


17 3 

wjar tv 
10:30pm 




28.9 




25.0 

km-'* tv 




26.3 


24 3 

wjar-tv 

7:00pm 


26 2 

10:30pm 




17.5 
10:30pm 




33 3 

wbrc-tv 




20 3 

7:00pra 


4 




24.9 
: 00pm 


20.5 

U.l-11 IV 

10:00pm 


19.3 

ksd-tT 
10:00pm 


25 3 

in OOpD 




17.3 

ffpra tv 
7:00pm 


5 


20 2 

wews 

| BOpn 


15.5 

wlw-c 
1" 30pm 


20.0 

wdsu-tv 




32.8 

wbrc-tv 


30.3 

wlw-il 

7:00pm 


19 3 

wjar-tv 
7:00pm 




5 


15 2 

WJW-tT 

7:30pm 


17 9 

wtili- t\ 


16.5 

»»l iv 
10:00pm 


15.9 

km 

9 :30pm 


38.8 

wbrc-tv 
8:30pm 


25.3 

wlw-d 
7:00pm 






5 

IT 
'ID 


9.2 

kyw-tv 
9:30pm 


23 9 

: >m 


24.9 
irdsu r> 

i .n 


26 2 

9:30pm 


31.8 
wapl-tv 
8:00pm 


22 3 

whio-tv 
7:00pm 








19 7 
kyw-tv 
5:00pm 




18.2 

WWl tv 


20.8 

kmox-tv 
4:00pm 


16.2 

wapi-tv 

4:00pm 




11.3 

wpro-tv 
8 :00pm 




5 
t« 




12 9 

utvn-tv 
10:00pm 


24.9 

viul IV 

9:30pm 


21.0 

tad tv 
10:00pra 


15.5 

wapl-tv 
9 :30pm 


31.3 

whio-tv 

10:3npm 












9.5 

wews 
10:30pm 


19.9 

wbns-tv 


21.5 

10:00pm 




27.8 
wbrc-tv 

9:00pm 




2 
-tr 

m 


24.8 

whio-tv 
7:0Opm 




5 
it 


12.2 

WjW-tT 

5:0Opm 


23.2 

10:30pm 






27.3 

wbrc-tv 




26.2 

wdsu-tt 

6:30pm 


26.3 

wbrc-tv 
5:30pm 














29.3 

WhlO-tT 

7:30pm 


17.8 

wpro-tv 
7:00pm 




20.9 

wwl-tv 
7:00pra 








18.5 

kyw-tv 
6:30pm 


22.5 

wttn-tf 


26.5 

6:00pm 










20 
wbrc-tv 
10:30pm 









li Pulse's own. Pulse determine* number by measuring which iU 
actually received by homee In the metropolitan area of a given mar- 
thouch station itself may be outride metropolitan area of the market 



Picture Q> 

*What's your WOODquotient ? 




WOOD-AM devotes more time to news than 
any other station in Grand Rapids. How 
many minutes per day? 248 263 197 



5-county Pulse surveys show WOOD-AM 
with the greatest share of audience for 
how many consecutive years? 10 6 3 

ICC tOj l"i »•"/ M.lf 

i /i a i |i , . •". "... it ,/ 




WOOD-AM personalities have double impact 
because they are: listened to by martini 
drinkers — stereophonic — appearing both 
on radio and WOOD-TV. 

IJ-flll'l i'll ' l 



Which Grand Rapids station has the only 
easily-remembered frequency? 

aoo H 

j: l oi/uij . >.ntiuy HpoqtLs9a9 — uotroti 

rijuo ju< (1 (700.11 ; "<>»1 not . ,\ 



How to rate your WOODquotient: 
right — Where were you last night? 
1-2 right — Let the Katz man fill you in. 

3 right — T.B.E. — (Time Buyer Extraordinaire) 

4 right — Just renewed your schedule, eh! 



WOOD-AM is first morning, noon, night. Monday through Sunday 
April '58 Pulse Grand Rapids 5 county area. 




WOOD 



AM 
TV 



WOODIand Center, Grand Rapids. Michigan 
WOOD-TV — NBC for Western and Central Michigan: 
Grand Rapids. Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon and Lansing 
WOOD — Radio — NBC 



65 



WCTV 



Solves 
Another Problem 

for a district manager 




.««•• 



Daves sales skipped markets he 
knew had people. 




IU* «\J^** 

-.•••••."•..•-V-VX ;'-;.*. 

— ■ Ks5B«VlS 



His sales manager was a most 
unreasonable man. 







Joe Hosford showed him that 
big-city coverage is not enough, 
said Atlanta is 212 miles away, 
and Jacksonville is 158, sug- 
gested that he use WCTV to fill 
the gap. 







Blair TV Associates made a trip 
to the agency. 




Now l)a\c \\;\- fun on weekend*. 



WCTV 



Tallahassee 
Thomasville 



for North Fla. and South Ga. 

John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Stations 



ANDREA 

I Cont'd from page 61) 

cialize in the quality tv and stereo 
market, with all its problems, because 
of consumer attitudes he had been 
aware of — and often ahead of — for 
42 years. The famous FADA radio 
of the '30's was one project of his. In 
fact, Andrea's manufacturing career 
is part and parcel of the history of 
listening and viewing. 

Andrea had a hand in designing 
tools and parts for the first prototype 
model radio from plans brought to 
the U. S. during World War I by an 
escaped German army engineer. 
When Lee DeForest contracted to 
build the receivers, Andrea was as- 
signed to supervise the job. 

After the war, he embarked on the 
manufacture of crystal sets. Then 
DeForest invented the audion tube, 
and the crystal set was doomed. 

Quickly, Andrea switched to the 
manufacture of parts that would be 
needed in building radios using au- 
dion tubes. His quick action put him 
on the crest of the demand. 

The best radio receivers in 1923 
were boasting of super-heterodyne 
circuits, but they were extremely 
noisy. When a Professor L. A. Hazel- 
tine of Stevens Institute contacted 
Andrea with a quiet "neutrodyne," 
he was soon turning out neutrodyne 
sets by the thousands. So successful 
was Andrea's business that he re- 
putedly turned down a S3 million of- 
fer made by Wall Street for a 1/3 
interest in his business. 

In 1927, RCA won a court case 
over the neutrodyne circuit, and 
Andrea, after agreeing to pay RCA 
one-half million dollars for licensing 
rights, continued to manufacture ra- 
dios of his own design and market 
them under the FADA label (from 
the initials of his name). He sold his 
business in l')32. in the depths of the 
depression. 

Television brought him out of re- 
tirement. In 1938. he marketed a tv 
kit, hut soon saw that tv would have 
no crystal set era, no do-it-yourself 
possibilities. So in 1939. he pro- 
duced a tv console model. It sold 
for "$700 un inflated, prewar dollars." 
He's been in the "qualitj market" 
ever since, and now with a banner 
>ales \ear under his belt, plans expan- 
sion beyond the New York- New Jer- 
sey-New England area with corre- 
sponding production increases. ^ 



SPOT PAPER JUNGLE 

(Cont'd from page 41 • 

tions, only their bills don't always 
mention it. Some stations bill with- 
out sending along affidavits of per- 
formance: such bills must then be 
returned. Occasionally, stations are 
delinquent in billing. Sometimes an 
invoice covering something that was 
overlooked nia\ come in a month or 
two later. 

"There also is a tendenc) ," Muller 
went on, "of some stations to bill on 
a weekly rather than a monthly basis, 
despite the fact that the agency bills 
the client month!) . Thus at the end 
of a month a station's invoices mav 
have come out for something like L 
3 7 weeks rather than a simpler four 
weeks in July and five weeks in 
August." 

From time to time, stations com- 
plain that agencies are slow pay, vet 
they themselves are often the prime 
contributing factors to the delav. 

"Better bookkeeping at stations 
would help." says Al Longo of JWT's 
treasurer's office. "If stations abided 
by the time orders sent out by agen- 
cies in the first place, everything 
would be much more simple when 
it came to billing." 

As things now stand, agencies have 
the feeling they are doing much of 
an individual stations' bookkeeping. 
It is comparable to a family with a 
charge account at a department store 
having to do the store's accounting 
and invoicing. 

One media head attributed about 
70% to 80% of payment arrearages 
to stations to station bookkeeping. 
"We could use Chinese bookkeepers 
to figure out some of their bills. In- 
\ oices frequently have no relation to 
reality," he said, "and we have to do 
the stations bookkeeping for them— j 
a wasteful duplication of effort." 

Of course, there are other reasons 
for slow pa\ : agencies ma\ run out 
of cash, have to make loans or collect 
from clients. But station hills are 
prime trouble. 

Ml these tangles resulting from the 
non-uniform and often inefficient in- 
voicing, have effects on the agency 
going beyond the department which 
has to cope with them. The paper 
thunderbolts can wheel around 
through checking and accounting de- 
partments, land right back in media. 

"At Bates," says thai agency's vice 



66 



SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 1959 




the most watched station in Sioux City 

KVTV channel 9 



Why? News coverage for one thing. KVTV 
keeps four newsmen busy giving Sioux City view- 
ers a first hand look at life and news around the 
world. KVTV's Washington Bureau, AP, UPI 
and Wirephoto services, plus area correspondents 
help thes? newsmen show the important happen- 
ings first on KVTV. See your Katz man. 




Bob Billman 



Dick Compton Charles Powell Jack Bomar 




CHANNELS. SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

CBS • ABC 



PEOPLES 
BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



Cleveland, Ohio 
Worthington, Ohio 
Trenton, New Jersey 
Fairmont, West Virginia 
Yankton, South Dakota 
Sioux City, Iowa 



PONSOR • 11 APRIL 1939 



67 




JIM LEWIS 
Popular air salesman 



Another Reason 

KXOA 

no. r, 

DYNAMIC 

SACRAMENTO 



Pulse Oct. '58 I Latest Metro) 
Rep: McGavren-Quinn 
VP-Mgr: Howard Haman 



over 

two million 

Italians 

agree 

it's 

WOV 

IN N.Y.C. & VICINITY 



NEW YORK -ROME 



SPOT PAPER JUNGLE 

[Cont'd from page 66) 

president and comptroller \\ illiam 
Hatch, "we always tr\ to keep esti- 
mates and hills in accord at all times. 
It is the only way a timebuyer can 
know exactly how much money re- 
mains in a budget." If an agency's 
hilling department is still struggling 
to decipher station bills two months 
after a campaign, the buyer in media 
has little chance to know what he 
can invest in the next campaign. 

Last week's installment told how a 
central hilling operation could work. 
Until such a thing comes along, how- 
ever, most agencvmen invoked in the 
after-the-campaign aspects of a spot 
buy feel that the answer could lie in 
a station representative hilling for his 
stations — provided he hills compe- 
tently and accurately. Such a pro- 
cedure is now being handled by at 
least three reps — The Katz Agency, 
Branham and CBS Spot Sales. Since 
the Katz system was singled out bv 
a number of admen as a model, here 
is the way it works: 

• By the eighth of each month. 
The Katz Agency sends out an aver- 
age of 10.000 bills to agencies cover- 
ing up to 150,000 individual spot 
announcements and programs. 

• By the 15th of that month, all 
client stations are paid in full for 
preceding month, whether agencies 
have paid Katz or not. 

• Due to the complexity ol rate 
cards, Katz maintains Li experts on 
rates in its billing department alone. 
At the end of a month, only from 30 
to 50 adjustments arc made in Kat/ 
computations — less than one pen cut 
margin of error on the total 10.1100 
hills. (If this article previously 
hinted that stations were the sole 
offenders in bookkeeping error- and 
that agencies were infallible, it is 
only fair to say here that kat/ sends 
from 100 to 200 letters a month to 
agencies correcting their errors). 

• The rep firm maintain- .i \ew 
York contract department of 12 peo- 
ple. They make up order- and check 
rates and condition- I'm the agencies. 

• The katz bookkeeping depart- 
ment comprising eight people, analy- 
ses even agenc) payment and gen- 
erally covers the range ol accounts 
payable work. 

• I he combined accounting de- 
partment handle- as much volume as 



many of the top advertising agencies. 

• When Katz pays a station, it 
deducts its commission at that time. 

The advantages of such a s\ stem to 
the agencies are fairly obvious. When 
an agency, for example, finds a dis- 
crepancy in a bill from a Kat/ stfl 
tion, a single phone call to Kat/ will 
straighten it out. Otherwise there 
would be lengthy correspondence 
with, long distance calls to an indi- 
vidual station. 

On the other hand, stations repre- 
sented by Katz get their money quick- 
ly and without dickering with indi- 
vidual advertising agencies. Thev 
simply send their affidavits to their 
representative and collect from him. 

To trace a sample time order 
through the Katz agency : 

(1) Salesman gets order, i Rates 
have already been checked through 
by a call to the rep firm accounting 
department) . 

(2) Back at office, salesmen clear 
time with stations. 

(3) Salesman's penciled instruc- 
tions go to accounting department. 

(4) Within 24 to 48 hours, copies 
of completed orders have gone out to 
all concerned i stations, agencies, 
etc.) with information as to rates 
contract year, rebates. 

(5) Rep billing section checks 
service from -tat ion logs recened 
daily: omissions and errors are 
picked up as soon as they occur. 

(6) At months end. stations send 
affidavits to katz: katz bills agencies 
after clearing collections, if any. 

(7) Payments to stations go out 
on 15th of month. 

(8) Katz receives payment frorr 
agencies, after which it checks agen- 
c\'s schedule for discrepancies. 

There may be no -ingle answer \< 
every problem of paperwork involva 
in a spot buy. But some answer- -ml 
as the Katz billing system, the I SM 
SRA standard confn mation-contrac 
form, the simplified rale cards, elimij 
nation of double rate-, antomatioi 
such as is in use 1>\ l'(i\\ am 
numerous other innovations 1>\ \ari 
ous rep-, stations and agencies ar 
-teps in the right direction. But the' 
are all somewhat individual step 
and main admen feci that unti 
evei j one is in step, the problem wi 
not be licked: uniformity and siir 
plicity are the only final answers 
making spot easy to bin. ^ 



in* 



68 



SPONSOR 



11 VPRIL 195' 







PER 
DAY 





HAT'S ALL IT COSTS TO STAY IN EOROPE! 

ese two new KLM tour plans give you more seeing and 

ore saving. For $10 a day (standard hotels) or $15 a day 

(first class hotels), all Europe is your playground. With 59 

ities to visit, your choice of tours is almost unlimited! 

ou'll see the sights you've heard about, and plenty you 

[haven't. It's everything you could want in a trip abroad, 

for the price of an at-home vacation. Your non-stop KLM 

flight from New York to Europe is budget-priced, too. 

Example: visit 6 European cities for just $502.20 round 

:rip. For complete details of these and the many other KLM 

:ours available, mail the coupon. 



KLM ROYAL DUTCH AIRLINES 

Tour Dcpt. SM-411 

430 Park Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 

Please Bend me full information on 

D "lO-lV tours n ••»" othtr KLM tours. 



Name 



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City. 



My Travel Agent It. 



Zone 



State 




SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 1959 



69 



AMST 

[Cont'd from page 38) 

12 vhf channels account for less than 
1% of the total number assigned. 

While AMST covered the technical 
angles of re-allocation on a number 
of fronts it bore down heavily on the 
dangers of obsolescence from tamper- 
ing with the vhf status quo. 

The public, particularly, Lindow 
stressed, has a huge investment in the 
present tv setup. Since 1 ( >I(>. it has 
spent more than $16 billion for new 
tv receivers and another $9 billion 
on antennas, servicing, repairs, etc. 
In recent years the public has been 
plunking down at least $2.5 billion 
annually. 

As for the broadcaster, FCC figures 
show that as of 1957, the year the 
latest figures are available, the orig- 
inal cost of tangible broadcast prop- 
erty (excluding translator stations) 
came to $546 million. It is easily 
$600 million now and in terms of re- 
placement value considerably more 
than that. 



Broadcasters are involved in a bil- 
lion dollar business. In 1957, total 
broadcast revenues came to $913 mil- 
lion with total broadcast expenses 
coming to $783 million. (Incidental- 
ly, 1957 was the first year the rate of 
increase of broadcast revenues over 
the previous year was considerably 
less than the rate of increase for ex- 
penses. ) The 1957 revenue figure 
compares with $338,000 in 1945, 
$6.7 million in 1948, $106 million in 
1950, $744 million in 1955. 

From the point of the view of the 
advertiser, television is getting more 
than ]'■'>'< of the advertising pie and 
took in $1,360,000,000 from advertis- 
ers in 1958. Tv's share was 11% in 
1955, 6% in 1952, 1.1% in 1949. 

Television's frequencies are well 
used and widely spoken for, the 
AMST presentation made clear. As 
of 21 February 1959, there were 708 
stations on the air. including educa- 
tional outlets, satellites and trans- 
lators. There were another 216 au- 
thorized stations not on the air. And. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIII!IIIII!IIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 

HOW VHF COVERACES COMPARES WITH UHF 




Ultfl 

2 . 



h 

2 

2 ' 



5 



if 
is 



2* 
1$ 



Using material from Television Allocations Study Organization (TASO), AMST 
chart shows that low-band vhf stations get out twice as far as high-band uhf 
outlets and cover, in terms of square miles, about five times as much territory 



i 



iiiiiiiiiiiiii mil ii iiiiiiiiiiiniiiililllillliii 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllF* 



finally, there were 91 stations where 
applications for construction permits 
are pending. This is a total of 1,015, 
of which 921 are authorized. Of the 
1,015, commercial stations totaled 
667. 

These figures. Lindow told the 
FCC, produce extremely significant 
facts about the average number of 
stations per tv channel. For exam- 
ple, the authorized stations averagj 
out to more than 11 per channel. 

It was 26 years after the birth of 
standard broadcasting before the av- 
erage am frequency loading came to 
11, an accomplishment tv achieved in 
14 years. By am s 1 1th year, the 
average was six authorized stations 
per frequency. As for fm, after 19 
years the average for the 100 chan- 
nels comes to eight authorized sta- 
tions. 

Furthermore, taking only the \hf 
tv stations into account, the average 
loading comes to 42 per channel. 
Even am radio, now approaching a 
total of 3.500 authorized stations, can 
boast no more than 32 per channel, or 
frequency. It is interesting to note 
that these 3,500 are squeezed into a 
spectrum band 1 mc. wide, which is 
one-six the span of only one tv chan- 
nel. 

"The growth in the number of tv 
stations." Lindow declared, "is ev» 
more phenomenal in view of the 
much greater cost of constructing and 
operating a television station con 
pared with a standard broadcasting 
station. As of the end of 1957. the 
3,076 operating non-network owned 
standard broadcast stations had an 
average investment in tangible broad- 
cast properh of $100,575 and aver- 
age broadcast expenses of $125,909 
All the same time, the 185 operating 
non-network owned tv stations had 
an average investment in tangible 
broadcast property of $871,800 and 
had average broadcast expenses ■ 
$795,900." 

As a result of the rocket-lik* 
growth of t\. the AMST executive 
told the Commission, it now servfj 
virtually the entire I . S. population 
B) 1 ( ^<> more than 09' ; of U. I 
families lived within the service area 
of al least one tv station and 77% 
were within range of four or move. 
Todaj about 85 to 90* I of tv homes 
are served by at least three stations 
Willi 50 million tv >ets in II million 
homes, there are now more video 
[Please tarn to page 72) 



,<> 



SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 1959 



\M 



\/ 

S/ 
\/ 

w 




The Case of the Brand New 
Half-Billion Dollars! 



When WSM-TV started telecasting from the Central 
South's Tallest Tower (1408 feet above average terrain), 
over $1/2 Billion in Effective Buying Income, and better 
than 1/2 million people, were automatically added to the 
Nashville Television Market. 



HERE ARE THE FACTS 


AND FIGURES: 




The New 
Nashville Market 




Total 
(New Tower) 


Gain 

(New Tower) 


Population 




1728,800 


546,700 


Effective 
Buying Income 




52,074,487,000.00 


$568,875,000.00 


^ Retail Sales 




$1,519,052,000.00 


$413,981,000.00 


M Market Data — Sales Management 








ALL THIS 


AND A 40.5 SHARE TOO (FEB. 


'59 ARB) 



If you want to garner your share of that $1/2 Billion, use 
WSM-TV, the station that has expanded the Nashville 
Market bv better than one-fourth. 



WSM-TV 

Nashville, Tennessee 

Represented by Petry 




•WNED AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
il)NSOR • 11 APRIL 1959 71 



m 



the 

towering 

pride 



south 
arolina 



EASTERN 
AMERICA'S 

TALLEST 

TV TOWER 

1526' 



'IS-TV with o new 1526' TOWER. 
rhich went into service in January, 
1959. covers MORE of the South 
Corolino markets, BY FAR, then 
any other television station 
plus coveroge in adjoining states 




THE 



Major Selling Fotee 



IN SOUTH CAROLINA 



channel 10 

IS -TV 






a 



COLUMBIA, S. C 



M 



rcpr«(cntcd nsttemWy ly 
mtk$. GRlfFIN. WOODWARD. INC 



ft 



I 

72 





AM ST 

i Cont'd from page 70 i 
receivers in homes than telephones. 
toasters, electric washing machines, 
electric clocks or bathtubs. 

Iln- gross volume of programing 
service provided b\ tv is tremendous. 
AMST figures show. Assuming an 
average of ll 1 -. hours of dailv pro- 
graming for each station on the air 
(excluding translators), the Ameri- 
can people gel 7,900 hours of service 
per day and nearlv 3 million hours 
annually. 

Each vhf channel serves a tremen- 
dous population. Even conservative 
AMST estimates put the average per 
channel al 50 million persons. Chan- 
nel I alone covers nearrj < ( !7 million 
persons and no channel serves less 



99 



Hi. 



[nan 11 million. 

While the uhl channels don't com- 
pare in coverage to the vhf stations. 
I hex slill add up to a substantial to- 
tal. One AMST exhibit showed that 
71 of the 83 uhf stations now on the 
air bring t\ programing to an aver- 
age of more than 324.000 per-ons pei 



able but AMST is not in favor of let- 
ling uhf channels go unless an "ap- 
propriate number of v's is gotten in 
exchange. 

AMST is particularly opposed to 
the proposed shift to an all-uhf tv 
system. The result of such a shift, 

WIST showed using data from the 
TASO studies, would be to re mow 
good quality tv service from '2W, of 
the total area of the U.S. And this i- 
conservative, for it assumes the cover | 
age factors of low-hand uhf only. 

Actually, an all-uhf service would in- 
clude high-band uhf stations also- 
and the latter provide less coverage! 
than low -band sen ice. 

The comparison, which described! 
specifically the coverage lost if a| 
uhf station on channels 14 to 40 were 
substituted for even operating "v. 
pointed up the fact that some state 
would surfer more than others. Fori 
example. VI' , of Iowa would lose hi 
service. M 1 )', of Mississippi and 34^n 
ol Arkansas. 

WIST conceded that under theol 
reticallv good conditions uhf signaU 



illllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllll!ll!lllllililllllllllllllllllllllll!!lll!ll!ll!ll!!l!lllllli 

RELATIVE NUMBER OF TV CHANNELS IS SMALL 

No. ol channels allocated to non-government service 
between 2o and 890 mc. 



l'v broadcasting 
Othei services 
fota] 



Vhf 


NUMBER OF CHANNELS ASSICNED 
Uhf 


Total 


12 


7(1 


82 


1858 


[06 


220 1 


1870 


176 


2346 


0.6% 


1 1.7% 


3.59! 



..I i\ to total 



Though tv takes up well over half of the non-government spectrum space be- 
tween 25 and 890 mc. in terms of channels assigned it has only 3.5% of the total 
number. Note that in the vhf portion of the spectrum, tv has a mere 0.6% of total 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll III 



channel. Stations now operating on 
nine ol the channels have a circula- 
tion of more than a million persons 
per channel, while stations on chan- 
nel 22 alone cove] more than 2 mil- 
lion. 

Nielsen Coverage Service No. 3 
was cited hv WIST as a measure of 
the audience which regularly tunes 
uhf. This showed thai as ol last 
spring about 12 million persons were 
regularlj receiving uhl service, 

\ VIST did not cite figures on uhf 
as an argument that uhf should be re- 
tained. Its position thai the current 
allocation table should be reworked 

SO that more vhf channel- be avail- 



could get out far. But it was point) 
out that rugged terrain, dense 
ami built up cities cut down the fie I 
strength of uhf signals considerabl 
Furthermore, uhl suffers from techn 
cal disabilities at the receiving en 
It is harder, for example, for a ul 
home antenna to boost the incoinii 
signal than for a vhf home antenn 
The transmission lines between a 
tenna and tv set lose more streng 
from a uhl signal than from a 'S I 
Finally, the group maintained, cm 
assuming conversion of existii 
equipment from vhf to uhf poss 
there i- no assurance it would provii 
a picture acceptable to the viewer. J 



SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 195' 







for every 10 "food dollars" spent in 

Indianapolis Trading area . . . there 

are $14 spent in its Satellite Markets. 

More mouths to feed mean more money being spent 
for groceries . . . and there simply are more people in 
the Satellite Markets than in the 18-county Indianap- 
olis Trading Area. That's why this big Mid-Indiana 
television market is different . . . you can cover all of 
them with WFBM-TV. 

Where else will you find satellite markets that are 33",, 
richer and 50 " bigger than the Metropolitan Trading 

only basic NBC coverage of America's 
13th TV Market — 760,000 TV homes. 



INDIAN A POLIS- Major retail area for 18 richer-than- 
average counties. 1.000.000 population— 350.600 families with 90°<, 
television ownership! 



Zone itself? Where else do you find such a widespread 
area covered from one central point . . . and by just 
one station with no overlapping basic affiliates of the 
same network ? 

WFBM-TV dominates Mid-Indiana, because it is the 
only basic NBC outlet penetrating this market. Nielsen 
Coverage Study §3 confirms these facts . . . and we're 
proud of our ARB. Let us show you how to test 
regional marketing ideas with amazing results. 

Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 



.•:0- : 



11 SATELLITES-Each market within WFBM-TVs 
verified coverage ... Marion • Anderson . Muncie • Bloomington 

• Vincennes • Terre Haute • Danville, Illinois • Lafayette • Peru 

• Logansport • Kokomo. 




BASIC NBC- 
TV AFFILIATE 



•ONSOK 



ll U'HII. L959 







WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



ADVERTISERS 



Mercury Records has gone all 
out as a sponsor of stereophonic 
programs on fm stations. 

It's bought, via the John \\ . Shav 
agency, the entire Concert Network 
and add to the list probabl) e\er\ fn 
market in the country not included ii, 
the CN. 

Mercury will also furnish the rec 
ords. 



SPRING GREENERY highlighted recent KWK (St. Louis) promotion. Here station's Mort 
Crowley, who dyed hair green for the occasion, issues last-minute instructions to the lovely 
models who sold brand new dollar bills at half-price to eager buyers in downtown St. Louis 




Pennington Press, a new book 
publisher bowing with headquar- 
ters in Chicago this week, is be- 
ginning an aggressive merchan- 
dising campaign quite out of tht 
ordinary for the usually ultra-con- 
servative publishing houses. 

Pennington i- sinking about 4<i', 
of its ad budget into regional radio 
and tv in an attempt to gain heavy 
distribution in non-book outlets sucl 
as supermarkets, drug stores, etc. 

Thev also have a plan in the mil 
to syndicate one of their juvenilt 



S10,000 BASKETBALL is displayed 
WDGY's (Minn. -St. Paul) proud manage 
Jack Thayer. Ball denotes amount raised 
state and city charities by station's teanl 
(clockwise): Bill Diehl, Don Kelly, Dai| 
Daniels, Stanley Mack and Jim Ran 



ll 



Ui>» 



1 



106>\ 



!&?> 



LET'S CELEBRATE! is mood of (I to rl 
Dave Stickle, film director, WMAR-TV, Baltl 
more, Jerome Hyams, v. p. Screen Gems, E. II 
Jett, station director and Ben Colemail 
Screen Gems sales manager, as they cloil 
deal on station's recent purchase of 143 rilnl 






li ' 



si'ONsni; 



11 APRIL 195 



miniated characters for tv — 
Maujjie Mucins, who lia- been live 
ii Canada l<>r Pennington l<>i some 

imc. 

Test campaigns lor their books are 

low going on in five radio and t\ 

narkets. I hi'\ will also use news- 
tapers ami billboards, and have plans 
i o push with |ioini (d purchase reiate- 
ial in bookstores as we'll as theii 
»ther non-book outlets. 

Pennington Press is a subsidiarj 
>l Merrick Lithograph) of Cleveland. 

■ampaigns: 

• Italian Swiss Colon) Wines 

as swung into a full-scale spring 
ampaign to promote all of its wine 

pes in 35 top markets. The plan-: 
eav) concentration ol evening tv. 
ia full sponsorship, 00- and 20-sec- 
nd spots, I.D.'s and daytime ra- 
io. \ total of more than 12.000 ra- 
10 -pots and 2.000 t\ spots will be 
ired during the campaign. Vgenc) : 

onig-Cooper, Harrington & Miner. 

• Melnor Industries will feature 
s newly-designed garden sprinkler 



\ ia spol l\ in 27 mai ketS, w illi a 

campaign to run through the >piinL'. 
V.genc) : Smith Greenland. 

• \\ . F. Schrafft's X Son- 
Corp., cand\ manufacturers, will 
make ii- how in network i\ via NBC 
TV's Jack Poor Slum. The hu\ re- 
sulted from Schi affl s recent spot t\ 
promotion in selected markets for 
\ alentine s Daj . The present cam- 
paign will continue through Christ- 
mas. Agency: Richard K. Manoff, 

New 1 oik. 

Winners: Ray-O-Vac recentl) held 
a "Radio Announcer's Pop Ten" con- 
test lor all announcers on the L29 
stations carrying ii- schedule. The 

top two: Charle) Greer, from \\ \KI!. 
Ucron, and Roberl Luek. Ktil . Mono- 
lulu. 

Strictlj personnel: Mark W. 
Cresap, Jr.. elected president and 

chief executive officer andGwilymA. 
Price, chairman of the hoard of 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. . . . 
Harry E. W holley. appointed V.p, 



i^i advertising and W arren Kratzke 
promoted i I\ ei i ising managi i foi 

\nici ii an Home I 'mil- . . . Joe 

Reda, John Archibald, Richard 
Falcon ami Richard Heffner, to 

Morse Internatii mal, I nc, as at i ount 
executives on products ol its parent 

CO. \ ii k ( hcmi< al. 



AGENCIES 



Roberl E. Ulen, F&S&B presi- 
dent, envisioning what would 
happen it all advertising stopped, 

noted these economic factors .it 
a meeting ol the San I i am i-i :o \>\ 
Club: 

1 i ( Irippling cutbacks in production 

of autos ami other consume! 
goods; 

2 i National magazine pi i< es -k\ rock- 

eting to $1.75 Sunda) newspa- 
pers to $1.50; 
3) Mounting unemployment in in- 
dusti\. business, publishing and 
i Please turn to page 82) 




INNING BONNET is modeled by WTOP, 

|Vash.) Easter contest judge Carol Le- 

rn, Washington Daily News women's ed., 

she holds second-place winner in lap 






0NS0R 



11 \i'i;ii. 1959 



FIRST IN U. S. is German-made antenna 
being erected by KPLR-TV. St. Louis. Here 
Siemens technician Max Becker congratulates 
Kenneth Hildenbrand, station eng. dir. Shown 
with them at site, technician E. Kloppa 




DAFFY HATS contest at WCAR, Pittsburgh 
netted these zanies modeled by d.j.'s (I to r) 
Pete Shore, Jim O'Neil and Jay Michael. 
Winner walked off with prize of $25 chapeau 
and personally conducted shopping tour 




PUCKER UP says Patsy Puetz (cente) as she prepares to demonstrate technique that won 
her title of "Most Kissable Lips" in recent contest staged by KING. Seattle. Station disk jock- 
eys Pat Lewis (left) and Ray Briem (right) and runners-up study the winning approach. 
Shown on the table nearby are some of the thousands of lip imprint entries sent in by listeners 





IN ROANOKE 

BUDWEISER 

LOVES 

WROV 

BOVA DISTRIBUTING CO., INC. 

1001 THIRD ST., S.E., ROANOKE, VA. • PHONE No. Dl 5-8874 

WHOltSALtHS OF ANHEUSCRBUSCH 6![«S 




Dear Burt: 

Since we regard you as a vital part of our "Budweiser Family", I thought 
you would like to know that In 1958 we were the only wholesale distributor 
of national premium beer in this market to show an increase over last year. 
We sincerely believe our advertising onJgJ2_is largely responsible for this. 

When we first went into radio back in 1955» using only your station, we 
operated three route trucks, one special delivery truck and ranked 2nd in 
the market, with our competitor selling almost 2- to-one over us. Today we 
operate five route trucks, three special delivery trucks, run our own trailer 
trucks, and rank #1 in the market by a substantial lead over our closest com- 
petitor. 

Frankly, I wasn't really sold on radio until after our first 13 weeks back in 
'55. When I told our salesmen we were giving the show up, they shouted NOV 
so unanimously.. . .they said everyone they talked to and called on was listening 
to i*....I changed my mind. Since that time, we've expanded our advertising 
on V|RQV to include spot saturation, Dodgers Baseball and participation in 
other personality shows on your station. 

This past year even though we went Into television, we felt we couldn't main- 
tain our dominance in the market and our steady yearly growth (whick runs much 
higher than the national average) unless we could maintain our saturation sched- 
ule of spots and programs on VffiOV. Today we spend about 60? of our total ad- 
vertising budget in radio, and I know you'll be pleased to learn that VJgpj will 
get approximately 80? of our total radio budget. 

Jerry Joynes, who has been our personality for the past four years, and your 
other personalities who have carried the Budweiser story to the public, have 
the knack of sounding so convincing, we feel they work for us as much as they 
do for you. We think we've got some mighty fine salesmen in Jerry and WROV 
and we want to keep them on our payroll for a long timel 



Cordially 



FB/db 




WHEN YOU KNOW YOU* Iff! . . . IT'S IOUND TO If IUD 



Use these WROV personalities and 
ROANOKE will love you! 

KEN TANNER • BARBARA FELTON 
JERRY JOYNES • LES DAVIS 
JIVIN' JACKSON 



WROV 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

Burt Levine, President 
represented by Jack Masla - Co., Inc. 



:». 



SPONSOR • I I VPRIL 195 



What's happening in V . S. (Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, station* 






II APRIL 1959 

C«»»rl|ht l»5S 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



The Federul Trade Commission is depending on the public to put the finger 
on allegedly misleading commercials and not on its own radio-tv monitoring unit. 

This was apparent in the testimony by F TC chairman John Gwynne before the House 
Appropriations Independent Office subcommittee made public this week. 

Gwynne disclosed that as a result of the public's activity the applications for complaints 
have been zooming. In fact, there's a backlog of 1,400 cases to he investigated — or 
about l 1 /-} years of work, at the present pace. 

What the FTC would like is $6,975,000 tor the coming fiscal year — an increase of 
§460,000 — some of which would be used to build up the monitoring staff. This staff, whose 
function is to check the complaints via kines and audio tapes, now stands at one man and two 
assistants. 

About $40,000 would be put to testing products, especially those involved in cosmetic and 
drugs advertising complaints. 

The FCC, on its own motion, has reopened the Miami channel 7 case to con- 
sider whether the license held by Biscayne TV should be cancelled for improper 
approaches to one or more FCC commissioners. 

The FCC has already held renewed hearings on Miami channel 10 and Boston channel 5, 
and waits for a green light from the Appeals Court for the same sort of new look at Orlando 
channel 9. The Miami case is the first it will rehear without direction from the courts. 

The FCC has set out the same sort of issues as in the earlier cases, based on information 
dug up by the House Commerce Legislative Oversight subcommittee. If this turns into a 
precedent, there could be rehearings of a large number of tv cases. 



On request of NBC, the FCC put off until May 8 of filings in the proposal to 
extend operating hours of daytime radio stations to 6 a.m. -6 p.m. when sunrise is 
later and sunset is earlier. 

NBC had asked for five months from the time of the notice of the proceeding, which 
would have meant a delay to June 12, since 5 months had been given on the proposal to per- 
mit daytimers to operate from 5 a.m.-7 p.m. FCC turned that one down. 



The National Labor Relations Board has ruled that it i* pcrmissahle for a 
union to picket a radio station, with the aim of turning advertiser- aua\ from the station 
and turning the public away from products which advertise on it, even though the union 
doesn't represent the station's employees and doesn't seek to represent them. 

1BEW represented employees of WKRG, Mobile, in resisting .Hurls ,,| the management 
to put in combination announcer-engineers, but lost a collective bargaining election thereupon 
called for by WKRG. 

The union said other Mobile stations want to put in combo operation, and that it is pic- 
keting to divert business to them, so as to protect the working conditions of its members at 
the other stations. 

That was the argument on which NLRB put its seal of approval. 



PONSOR • 11 APRIL 1959 



77 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



II APRIL 1959 The influx of tobacco money into syndication will put a new look on the three 

c»yright 1959 big categories among national spenders in 1959. 

sponsor You can tell a great deal about the changing complexion of film spending by scanning 

publications ino. the station lists of the biggest national spenders in these three leading categories in syndi- 

cation: 

1) FOOD: Kellogg's in 190 markets; Nestle's in 88; Nabisco in 80; Continental Bak- 
ing in 75; Carnation in 50; Pillsbury's in 30 and Armour in 20. 

2) BEER: Budweiser in 90 markets; Pabst in 50 and Schlitz in 30. 

3) TOBACCO: Camels on close to 100 stations; Lucky Strike on 44; Raleigh on over 
20 and Tareyton on 16. 

But note an entirely different distribution of syndication spending by regional adver- 
tisers as shown by this rundown of key spenders: 

1) Beer: Falstaff in 66 cities; Ballantine in 36; Olympia in 45. 

2) FOOD: Chain stores include Colonial in 21 markets, Kroger in 20, and A& P and 
Safeway in under a dozen cities each; food products include Blue Plate in 23 cities. 

3) GASOLENE: Amoco in 59 cities, Conoco in 65, Standard-Chevron in 63 and D-X 
Sunray in 50. 

There are still a number of syndication and national spot spenders who bowed 
out of the medium in the last year or so that are still missing. 

Four big ones are Hamm's beer, Nationwide insurance, Wilson & Co. and Heinz. 



CBS Films appears to be trying to break away, in part, from the formula of 
the action-adventure show backed by the endorsement of a law-enforcement agency. 

Four series on the current shooting schedules are on such diverse subjects as art, diplo- 
macy, Broadway entertainment and the American revolution. Their respective titles are The 
Man From Antibes, The Diplomat, Theatre For a Story (on tape) and The Silent Saber. 



Jt looks like there will be only four half-hour time periods a week available 
for syndication this fall between 7:30-11:00 p.m. in three-station markets. 

Here's what's shaping up for local control, all between 10:30-11:00 p.m.: Monday and 
Wednesday on NBC TV stations, Tuesday and Saturday on ABC T\ affiliates, and nothing on 
CBS outlets. 

But you can expect a repeat of what happened this season: stations putting syndication 
into those same nighttime slots as network shows folded in midseason. 



These two major syndication transactions came out of Missouri agencies latl 
week: 

1 i Budweiser renewed NTA's U. S. Marshal for a second year in 90 markets througl 
Gardner of St. Louis. 

2 i D-X Sunray expanded its buy of ITC'a N. Y. Confidential to 100 cities via Potts 
\\ Ilmi \. Kansas Cit\ . 

73 SPONSOR • 11 APRIL 195' 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The rule of thumb on whether a network series should change its title when 

it goes into syndication is this: if the network Beries i- -till on the air, a namr- 
change in the syndicated re-runs would be advisable to prevent confusion and com* 

petition. 

Thus Dragnet became Badge 714, The Lineup became San I rancisco Beat, Jackie Gleason 
became The Honeymooners, and The Millionaire became li x i ou Had A Million. 

But shows that wenl off the network usually kept their name in syndication: Burns and 
Allen, Life of Riley, Jim Bowie, Crusader, Frontier, and others. 



COMMERCIALS 



Medium-sued commercials producers are trying to get into programing as well, 
as a means of coping with an eventual tape economy. 

\ an Praag, for example, is readying a live comedy on ad iibbing and a filmed adventure 
on tramp Hying. 

But note this problem: since tape may or may not be ready to handle much programing 
at the moment, the producer must get into live or film production now if he wants a 
share in tape in coming years. 

Don't be surprised if American commercials formats get a British look on 
some shows in the fall. 

Comparative testing is underway for some shows to put all their commercials in one in- 
termission in British fashion, and for American formats with separate commercials to be 
tried out in England. 

One indication of US-UK swapping of know-how on commercials will be Horace Schwer- 
in's London talks with ATV this June. 

There are still a number of wrinkles to he ironed out in humor commercials, 
according to recent effectiveness studies. 

In cases such as the Piel's, Tip-Top and Alka-Seltzer spot commercials, effectiveness was 
high at first but reportedly fell off with the sales message drawing less and less atten- 
tion after a few months. 

The era of mobile tape operations has started. 

The first show conceived with the tape cruisers in mind. On the Go, starts the end of 
this month with Art Linkletter as a morning strip on CBS. 

Keep your eye also on mobile tape's possibilities for industrial closed circuit use; Ampex 
last week led the way by promoting itself with demonstrations in Detroit to General Motors, 
Ford and Chrysler. 

For details on 40 tape recorders delivered in March, see Film WRAP-UP, page 83. 

Westinghouse Broadcasting's tape syndication of information shows is luring 
some sponsor coin that other program types have not been able to reach. 

Merchant's National Bank of Boston, for example, came into syndication b) sponsoring 
American Forum on WBZ-TV. 

Besides a different type of program, the new format brings the local advertiser into 
prime time and suits a limited tv budget, since the time is pre-empted only once a month. 

sponsor • 11 APRIL 1959 79 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



II APRIL 1959 

C*pyrl|ht 1958 

•P0N80R 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



S. C. Johnson apparently isn't letting nostalgic sentiment run away with it: The 
wax and cleanser company turned down NBC TVs version of Fibber McGee & Molly. 

Johnson sponsored Fibber for many years in radio. In fact, the show's Tuesday night 
spot was ranked as impregnable to opposition. 



Never let it be said that CBS TV's program department outscores NBC TV's — 

at least not in the number of vice-presidents. 

With two programing v.p.s added last week, NBC now has seven compared to CBS 
TV's five. 

Pay no attention to the report that Yellow Pages is switching from spot tv to 
network. 

As explained by Cunningham & Walsh, any such move would be both impractical and 
harmful. Yellow Pages must have flexibility, since the spot schedules are closely related 
to the individual selling periods of the 14 phone companies using the C&W copy. 

Collectively, the spot budget now runs close to $1 million a year. 



The airlines running between New York and Detroit must be getting enough 
traffic from the networks alone to give them a good profit. 

Rarely a weekday has gone by in recent weeks when sales delegations from the three tv 
networks weren't found scurrying around the auto companies and their Detroit 
agencies. 

Fuller & Smith & Ross in making pitches to its clients refers to three kind* 
of radio as available to the buyer today. 

The categories: (1) Housewife radio; (2) selective tuning radio, such as for news, 
weather, and public service; and (3) promotional radio, where the advertiser, bent on sup- 
porting his dealers with a special effort, gets both circulation and advertising. 

Agency people who have to wrestle with a product that has an ephemeral mar- 
ket have it easy in comparison with a yeast brand back in the '30s. 

Each psychological appeal was exhausted every 1 1 days, and the agency was constantly 
faced with the task of picking up a new set of customers with a separate copy platform 
and media strategy. 






80 



The return of Chase & Sanborn to JWT can't help but recall to Thompson 
\etcrans a reverse situation: how that agencv in l'J-14 got the news that Old Gold wai 
being moved buck to Leuneii & Mitchell (now Lennen «\ Newell). 

(Jut of the blue one morning came a letter addressed to no one in particular at 
JWT, merely giving the date of cancellation. The notice was signed by Lorillard's then 
president, Arthur Herbert Kent. 

Consequence: Even before the account heads or the management knew about it, the news 
of this exit of $5 million was all over the agency. 



SPONSOR • 1 I APRIL 1959 






Nothing else like it 

in Greater New York 

IN PROGRAMMING: The voice of WVNJ is 
unique. It's the only radio station in the entire 
Metropolitan New York area that plays 
just Great Albums of Music from sign on to 
sign off — 365 days a year. 

IN AUDIENCE: So different, too. So largely 
adult — so able to buy — so able to persuade 
others to buy. And in Essex County alone 
(pop. 983,000) WVNJ dominates in 
audience — in quality of audience — 
and in prestige. 

IN VALUE: It delivers the greater New York 
audience for less than 31c per thousand homes — 
by far the lowest cost of any radio station 
in the market. 



RADIO station OF "(The Xctuark 2?ctus 

national rep: Broadcast Time Soles • New York, N. Y. • MU 4-6740 





"ONsor • 1 1 \i>rii. 1959 



::i 



WRAP-UP 

{Cont'd from page 75) 

other advertising-related indus- 
tries, and 
4) Mass departure of t\ personalities 
from the daih tv fare to toll tv. 
The meeting ended on an April 
Fool note when newsboys distributed 
a special!) -prepared front-page of a 
San Francisco paper headlined — "Ad 
Prohibition Repealed." 

Agency appointments: Volkswag- 
en, with estimated billings at SI mil- 
lion, to Doyle Dane Bernbach, for 

about !i0' , of the advertising budget, 
and Fuller & Smith & Ross, for 



the rest, with the West German auto- 
mobile co.'s truck division . . . Chase 
& Sanborn Coffee, billing approxi- 
mately $8 million, from Compton to 
JWT . . . Guest Aerovias Mexico, to 
Vdams & Keyes (formed b\ the 
merger of Burke Dowling Adams 
with St. Georges & Keyes) . . . Mead. 
Johnson & Co., for its institutional 
advertising, to Kastor, H,C,C & A 
. . . The Chicago. Milwaukee, St. 
Paul and Pacific Railroad Co., to 
JWT . . . The Rock Cit\ Tobacco 
Co. of Canada, Ltd., for its Craven 
"A" and Sportsman brands, to Mae- 
Manus, John & Adams . . . The 
White Shield Co.. distributors of 




- WOC- TIP 5 

FOR BEST COVERAGE IN THE 
NATIONS 47th TV MARKET 

(Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island — Moline, Illinois) 

A comparison of coverage of TV stations in or overlap- 
ping the Davenport — Rock Island market area as 
reported in the Nielson Coverage Service No. 3 — 
Spring, 1958. 



Station 

WOC-TV 
Station A 
Station B 
Station C 
Station D 



TV Homes 

438,480 
398,600 
340,240 
274,990 
229,260 



Monthly 
Coverage 

308,150 
278,900 
275,160 
208,300 
156,340 



Weekly Circulation 
Daytime Nightime 



263,430 
226,020 
229,710 
153,540 
127,240 



288,750 
258,860 
260,190 
191,010 
146,620 



w 


> ol II 1 Palmer 
Prnidcnt 

1 rnesi ' s.injcn 


^ 


Pu Shaffer 

s.iin Manager 

i 1 'Tin. Woodward. 
Im Eiclusivc National 
Reprevntalivej 


Till Ol INI (Mils 

DAVENPOM , , OWA 

III 1 II MHIKI 1 


^ 




channel 


MOIINI III 

1 SS 1 Mill INI 


-to--J 



WOC-TV is No. 1 in the 
nation's 47th TV market — lead- 
ing in TV homes (438,480), 
monthly coverage and weekly 
circulation — day and night — 
as reported in the Nielson 
Coverage Service No. 3, Spring, 
195.H. Tor further tacts and lat- 
est availabilities, call your PGW 
Colonel . . . NOW! 




WOC-TV Dovenport, Iowa is port of Cenlrol 
Broodcosting Co., which also owns ond operates 
WHO TV ond WHO Radio. Dcs Moines, lowo 



drugs and vitamins, to Kilter. Sand- 
ford, Price & Chalek, New Yorl 

. . . American Dairy Association of 
Iowa, to Truppe, LaGrave and 
Reynolds, Des Moines . . . The Ler- 
ner Sleep Shops, billing about siim.. 
000, to the Zakin Co., New YorH 

People on the move: Rohert 
Burton, v.p. in charge of the Chi- 
cago office and G. T. C. Fry. \ .p. of 

the Detroit office, to senior v.p.'s at 
K&E . . . Rohert Bode and Donald 
(rihhs, to senior v.p.'s at Kudner 
. . . Paul Freyd becomes director of 
marketing at BBDO . . . James 
Egan, Rohert Hayes and Harry 
Ireland, to senior v.p.'s at D,C,S&£ 
. . . Milliard Graham and Joseph 
Furth. to v.p. s in the Chicago office 
and Anthony Gee, to media direc- 
tor in New York, of EWR&R . . . 
Arthur Sawyer, to media directoi 
of Johnson \ Lewis. San Francisi 
. . . Ed Krein. to v.p. and account 
supervisor of Western \dvertising 
Chicago . . . Alvin Kahaker. v.p. 
and director of West Coast radio and 
t\. to general manager of the Los 
Angeles office of Compton . . . Leon- 
ard Andrews, to v.p. and creative 
director and Madeline Brown to i 
media director of Clarke. Dunagan & 
Huffhines, Dallas . . . James Sum- 
mers, to executive v.p. ol Harold 
Cabol \ Co., Boston. 

Add personnel moves: Frank H. 
Leonard, appointed public relatione 
director of Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 
. . . Douglas (.allow, to executive 
assistant in the research department 
of SSC&B . . . Mel Tenenbaum, to 
radio t\ director of Jack T. Sharp 
Advertising, Cleveland . . . Sidnej 
Koss. to merchandising and promo- 
tion director of Robin. Lee \ \rnold. 
Beverl) Hills . . . John Forney, t' 
executive \.p. and Arden Moser. t. 
media director of Robert Luckie c\ 
Co., Birmingham . . . Howard Fish 
er, named v.p. and account executw 
and Sheldon Kaplan to radio l\ 
director at Roger & Smith Vdvertis 
ing, Dallas . . . Hal Dickens, to tin 
merchandising department and Myi 
n a MeCaule) and James Man tin 
to copywriters at Tatham-Laird. Chi 
cago . . . Barrj Blau, Edwh 
Greenblatt and Byron (aildts. t 
the creative staff of SSC&B . . . Bar 
bara Downtain, to publicity dim 
lm of Powell. Schoenhrod c\ I la 1 
Chicago. 



! ■ 



■ 






82 



SPONSOR 



11 m'uii. 195 






Account men alignments! Bo 

.Mmulay. in Ted Bates & Co. . . . 
Mouncej Ferguson, to \\ . S. 
\\ alker Advertising, Pittsburgh . . . 
Roger Strecker, Kent Westrate 
ami Art Watson, to Tatham-Laird, 
( Shicago. 



FILM 



Thr National Theatres acquis!- 
tion of NTA got the finishing 
touches last week with the ap- 
pointment of two NTA officers to 

the National Theatres board. 

The two arc NTA chairman El) \. 
Landau and presidenl Oliver \. 
I nger. 

Note thai the station holdings of 
tin- new combine now comprises 
\\M \-T\.\cuark: KMSP-TV,Min- 
aeapolis, plus \\D\I -T\ . Kansas 
City, plus related radio affiliates. 

Stock transfer: Official Films has 
purchased all the stock original!) 
driven to Dick Powell, David Niven 
and Charles Boyei in connection with 
Four Star Productions. 

ape equipment: \.mpex reported 
deliver) of 13 VTR-1000 units dur- 

i ii - March to 1 ( ) stations and produc- 
bn centers, as follow-: NBC, 12 
olor units: TV dr Mexico, 7 record- 
is; Sakata Shokai (Japan), 4; Rank 

intel l London i. 2: Peter De Met 

H hicago), 2; \\ DAF-TV, Kansas 

it\. 2: John Cuedel production-. 2: 

rid one each to the-e: \\II.\-TY. 

junpa; Siemens (Germany); Con- 
air: KFMB-TV, San Diego; KGBT- 
l\. Harlingen; KTRK-TV, Houston; 
Sports Network; \\I.\\-T\. Cincin- 
nati; Mobile Video Tape Services 
I os Ingeles) ; KFGZ-TV, Ft. Worth, 
KTNT-TV, Tacoma, WPRO-TV, 
Providence, and KIT.Y \da . . . 
This brings total tape coverage to 
r ->2 of the top 100 markets to date. 

Sues: MCA's Paramount features 

tackage to WROC-TV, Rochester, 
N. Y. . . . Ziv's Bold I enture to real- 

or Panorama Development on 
WHEC-TV, Rochester, Y Y. . . . 
■ I \ feature and cartoon sale- to 
KRTY. Great Falls; KGHL-TV, Bill- 

ngs; W RWV-TV,Thermopolis,Wyo.; 
kLRJ-TV, Las Vegas; KFJZ-TV, Ft. 

Worth; WTAE-TV, Pittsburgh; 
pKBW-TV, Buffalo; KENS-TV, San 

Vntonio; KGNS-TV, Laredo; KPTV, 



Portland; KPHO-TV, Phoenix; 
WS\ \ TV, Harrisonburg; \\ l\K 
l\. It. Myers; K M I TV, ( arlsbad; 
\\ \l \/ l\. \l aeon : CKGM-TV, 
North Hav : KSHO-TV, Las Vegas; 
WGR-TV, Buffalo and \\ I \\l\. 
Columbus, • >.... /i\ - Sea Hunt to 
double exposui e in New i ork i in 
\\ IM\ as well as \\ \I5(.-'I\ Foi Su i 
Oil and Bristol-Myers. 

Production: CBS Films' " hirly- 

birds will bolster third year produc- 
tion u ith guesl stars Ethel \\ aters, I. 
Carroll Naish and several other- . . . 
\l-o on ( IBS Films' production clip- 
board is the pilot film of The Ifan 
From Intites starring Robert Uda, 
to he shot in Nice 1>\ Sam Gallu. 

Commercials: Robert Lawrence re- 
ports an all-time high of 112 commer- 
cials in current production, including 
work in New York, Hollywood and 
Toronto studios plus several done on 
location- . . . Roy Ross ha- formed 
his own musical commercials produc- 
tion organization in New York . . . 
E. B. Edwards has been appointed 
business manager ol Music Makers 
. . . I'inlofl Production- report- 50 { - 

time savings in new live-animation 
combination technique used for lip- 
top through Grel Advertising and 
Dixie Cup via Hick- \ (ireist. 

Strictly personnel: 1TC appoint 

ments last week included the follow- 
ing: Kevin O'Sullivan as regional 
manager, New York division, George 
Gray as northeast district manager, 

Mhert (». Hartigan as New i ork 
Cit\ account executive, Frank Shee- 
han as western district manager of 

\rrow Productions division, and El- 
lingwood (Bud) Kay as execu- 
tive stor) editor . . . Larry Lowen- 
Btein becomes executive director of 
Rogers and Cowan in New i ork . . . 
Ed Palmer i- assistant to president 
Herman Rush of Flamingo Films . . . 
B. Crenshaw Bonner and Edward 
Adler to the sales >tatl of Jayark 
Films, in the southeast and midwest, 
respective!) . . . Burt Schultz joins 
Nl \- public relation-; department 
. . . Arthur Sprit named v.p. ol 
\ I \ program sales. 

Trade notes: Directing t\ commer- 
cials will be the subject of the April 
15 RTES meeting in New York . . . 
John Freese ol Young ^\ Rubicam 
has been named American judge of 



THE ONLY ONE 



THAT GIVES YOU 

ALL THREE 




CAESARS,HEAD • SPARTANBURG 

•GREENVILLE 



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GREENVILLE 

SPARTANBURG 

ASHEVILLE 

Only WFBC-TV, "The 
Giant of Southern Skies," 
gives you dominant cov- 
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Ask the Station or 
WEED for latest market 
data, surveys and avail- 
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Represented Nationally by 
WEED TELEVISION CORP. 



CHANNEL 4 

WFBC-TV 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

NBC NETWORK 



RADIO AFFILIATE. THE PIEDMONT GROUP 
WFBC GREENVILLE WORD - SPARTANBURG 



iPONSOR 



II u'kii. 1959 



the Cannes festival of advertising 

lilm-. 

Awards: ^.mong the nine i\ com- 
mercials decorated by the \rt Direc- 
tors Club <>! New York last week. 
were these: Ford \ ia .1. Walter 
Thompson 3 Chemstrand nylon through 
Doyle Dane Rernhach and I ek 
Hughes of Johnson \ Johnson \ia 
Young & Rubicam. all produced b) 
Transfilm. 



NETWORKS 



The George Foster Peabody 
Awards for distinguished achieve- 
ments by tv and radio during 
1 9.>8 were presented ihis week 
at the RTES luneheon in New 
York. 

The Peabody winners: 
Tv News: NBC News— The Huntley- 

Brinkley Report 
\\ Dramatics Entertainment: Play- 
house 90, CBS 
Tv Musical Entertainment : Lincoln 
Presents Leonard Bernstein and 
the New York Philharmonic, CBS 
Tv Entertainment with Humor: The 

Sieve Allen Show, NBC 
I \ education: Continental Class- 
room, \i;c 

Tv Programs for Youth: College 

News Conference, ABC 
Tv Programs for Children: The lilne 

Lauy. WGN-TV, Chicago 
Tv Contributions to International 

I ndei standing: M.I). Internation- 
al. NBC 
T\ Public Service: CBS 
l\ Writing: James Costigan and 

"Little Moon ol - 1 " "n." Hallmark 

Hall of Fame, NBC. 
I\ Special Awards: An Evening w ih 

Fred Istaire, NBC and Ors m If ells 

and "Fountain of ) oath." Colgate 

Theater, NBC 
Radio News: WNEH . New York 
Radio Public Service: The Hidden 

Ret olution, CBS 
Radio Education: Standard School 

Broadcast, Standard Oil Co. of 

< lalifornia 
Radio Contribution to International 

I nderstandina : Fas\ as ABC. 

VBC-1 NESCO 

Network t\ business: Lever Bros. 

(JWT), for The Jacl Benn) Show, 
h hich sw itches to Sundaj . I <> p.m., 
ilii- fall, alternating with George 



GoLel (also lor Lexer i on CBS TV. 
Gohel moxes to CBS after five years J 
with NBC TV . . . Drug Research 
Corp. ik.H,C,C&A>, for segments 
of ABC TV's American Bandstand 
. . . Mars i knox Reeves I, for Broken 
Arrow, on ABC TY next season. 

Network tv programing notes: 

The Last Frontier, hour-long series 
on Alaska, purchased by CBS TV. 
Another Martin Manulis series — 
Adventure In Paradise, went to ABC 
TV. with Liggett & Myers in for 
part sponsorship . . . The George 
Hamilton II Show debuts on ABC 
TV this Monday (13) noon, in place 
of the previously planned Buddy 
Deane Show. I For more program- 
ing notes, see Comparagraph, page 
45, this issue.) 

Campaign: ABC Radio is set for 

its summer product promotion for 
advertisers, dubbed "Play It Cool, 
designed to provide summer products 
with direct on-the-air promotion and 
editorials together with merchandis- 
ing aids for advertisers' marketing 
forces. The campaign will run for 
13 weeks. 

Treasurer's report: AB-PT's an- 
nua] 1958 report shows an all-time 
high in gross income — $244,821 mil- 
lion, against $215,877 million i>' 
1957. and improved earnings after 
taxes of $6,116 million, compared 
with $4,894 million in 1957. 

New network affiliates: WHYN 
I \ . Springfield-Holvoke. Mass.. to 
ABC TV . . . KMRC, Morgan City, 
la.. WELY, Ely. Minn., WCBC, An- 
derson, Ind. and KSIG. Crowley, La.. 
to Mutual . . . WLOW, Norfolk- 
Portsmouth. \ a.. \\ KAL, Rome -I lira 
and WLST, Kscanaba, Mich., to 
MIC Radio. 

Strictlj personnel: Philip Lut- 
tinger, to research projects super- 
vise for CBS TV . . . Eugene Aln- 
wick and Philip D'Antoni, to the 
national sales staff at Mutual . . . 
John \\ ilkofi". to sales presentation 

copywriter in the sales promotion 
and advertising department of CBS 
TY . . . Ira DeLumen, named sales 
service manager, production sales, in 
the operations department, CBS IV 
Hill Gittinger, former CBS sales 
manager, is in a Summit, V J., hos- 
I Please turn to page l\l\ i 



What if you re ou 
to reach the I 
cotton pickin set? 



Is your market regional? Coverage is 
easier when your show is on film 
Every station in the land is equipped 
to handle it . . . and you know youi 
message comes through the way yoo 
want it to ! 

Actually, film does three things 
you ... 3 big important things: 

1 . Gives you the high-polish com- 
mercials you've come to expec 
. . . fluff-free . . . sure 

2. Gives you coverage with 
pre-test opportunities 

3. Retains residual values 



'* 



/ 




For more information write: 

Motion Picture Film Department 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N. Y. 

East Coast Division 
342 Madison Ave. 
New York 17, N. Y. 






Midwest Division 

1 30 East Randolph Drive 

Chicago, 111. 

West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 

Hollywood 38, Calif. 



W. J. German, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and distribution e 
Eastman Professional Motion Picture Fil 
Fort Lee, N. J.; Chicago, III.; 

Hollywood, Calif. IAIwq 



84 




Always shoot it on EASTMAN FILM . . . You'll be glad you did! 



every time buyer 
reads 




SOB 





^ 




, : 

I 


>Ri 


\ 








1 




+ 




— h— L. 


L 1 

»f - / J 
r-3— £t 


; 




FH 



BUT FOR EVERY TIMEBUYER 
THERE ARE TEN OTHER DECISION 
MAKERS BEHIND THE SCENES 
WHO READ SPONSOR AS WELL 



Rarely indeed does one man alone determine when and 
where to place radio or TV business. That's why 
it makes sense to reach every decision maker possible 
with your message because every voice that helps 
to finalize a sale should know your story. 

It's the chief reason your advertising will do so 

well in SPONSOR. SPONSOR reaches almost everybody 

who is anybody in air. All the timebuyers, of course, 

but more decision makers, too, at every level (in 

both the agency/advertiser category) than any 

other broadcast publication. 

Proof? 

Fair enough! 

SPONSOR is the only broadcast publication that 
offers a complete circulation breakdown BY JOB 
CLASSIFICATIONS— listing the exact number of 
subscribers (with their names and titles) at every 
management level. We'll be happy to show it to you 
at your convenience and prove beyond doubt that 
SPONSOR reaches more teams that buy time than any othei 
book in the field. 



PONSOR 



ells the TEAM that buys the TIME 






WRAP-UP 

(Cont'd from page 84) 

pita] under treatment for a hearl 

attack. 



RADIO STATIONS 



"Radio will without question de- 
liver the biggest summer audi- 
ences in its history — and could 
well heat tv in number of people 
reached and total time spent with 
the medium." 

Ill is prediction made by Albert 
Sindlinger, president of the research 
firm bearing his name, highlights 
KAB's summer selling drive now 
underway. 

Other plans by RAB include: 

• \ 14-page, in-depth summer me- 
dia presentation to 4,400 advertisers 
and agencies, spelling out which me- 
dia loses audiences in summer — and 
proves that radio doesn't; 

• A multi-city series of presenta- 
tions to key summer radio prospects; 

• A special factbook on the size of 
automobile radio and its audience. 

Plough now has five stations: Its 
latest acquisition — Storer's WAGA, 
Atlanta. The agreement to sell the 
station, according to Storer, is to 
gain FCC approval for the purchase 
of KPOP, I, (is Angeles, since the 
group already owns the maximum of 
seven stations. 

Other station purchases: KLX, 

San Francisco, to KFWB, Los \n- 
geles, president, Robert Pureell. di- 
rector of operations of Crowell-Collier 
Publishing Co.. for $750,000 . . . 
kKOVY, San Francisco, to Texas 
broadcasters Gordon MeLendon and 
B. R. MeLendon. for $800,000. The 
McLendons own five other radio 

station--. 

Ideas at work: 

• \ zan) \|uil Fool's Day promo- 
tion: WINS. New "i oik. played a dif- 
IikiiI record backwards each bom. 
with five silver dollars awarded to 
listener^ identifying the number, \ia 

telegrams. Between 10 a.m. and 5 

p.m.. station recci\cd 4.500 cables. 

• How they promoted Easter: 
WO\M. Miami, hid a bunny, airing 
< lues to its location . . . WCKY. ( !in- 

einnali. held a "fl\ ing Faster egg 

hunt," with a plane dropping colored 
ping pong balls in the area, redeem- 



:;:: 



able for trading stamps . . . WSA1. 
Cincinnati, conducted a "Easter 
bonnet contest"' for original hat crea- 
tions submitted by listeners. 

Stock firm buys fm: Burnham \ 
Co.. members of the New York Stock 
Exchange, to promote its Mutual 
Funds, ordered a 13-week, 30-spots- 
I hi -week schedule via WNCN, New 
^ ork . . . Another business note: The 
Philco International Division, for a 
series <>l four Latin American pro- 
grams to be beamed over the Inter 
American network via WRUL. New 
York. 

Station staffers: Richard Gess- 

ner, appointed station manager of 
WKAL, Rome-Utica . . . Robert 
Mullen, to general manager of the 
Cincinnati office of WLW Promo- 
tions, Inc. . . . H. S. Basayne, pro- 
moted to program director of WCCO, 
Minneapolis-St. Paul . . . Boh Ryan. 
to head the newly-created exploita- 
tion department of KOMO-AM-TV. 
Seattle . . . Harry White, to mer- 
chandising manager of KFRE, Fresno 
. . . Robert Van Roo, to promotion 
manager of WTCN-AM-TV, Minne- 
apolis-St. Paul . . . Thomas O'Con- 
nor, to acting program manager, 
WBAL, Baltimore. 

\dd station staffers: Jack Brus- 
sel, named general sales manager for 
WJR, Detroit . . . Frosty Mitchell, 

to program director of KIOA, Des 
Moines . . . Gary Seger, program di- 
rector. KI\IZ, Phoenix . . . James 
Yergin. to director ol advertising 
and promotion for WOR, New York 
. . . Jav Clark, to program director. 
\\ \\/. New Haven . . . H. Robert 
Rcinhard. to sales manager. \\ G1>P>. 
Freeport, L. I. . . . Elliot Sanger. 
Jr., to promotion manager of \\ OXR. 
New York . . . Donald Wilks. to 
radio account executive in the New 
York office of Good Music Broad- 
casters. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



McGavren-Quinn underwent a 
general revamping with the res- 
ignation of Donald J. Ouinn. ex- 
ecutive v.p. in the rep company's New 
"\ oi k office. 

The change will send McGavren, 
president, to New York, and the firm 
will be called Daren F. McGavren 

Co. 



Cj Ostrup, from the Los Angeles 
office, will take over as manager in 
San Francisco and Charles King will 
fill the newlj created post of West 
Coast business manager. 

The katz Agency has developed a 
Radio Programing Check List, to 
provide stations with a way of ob- 
taining a profile of their programing 
acth ities. 

The 13-page questionnaire coverj 
all areas of station programing, in- 
cluding music, news, promotion, pro- 
duction, public services, and such. 



1 
t 

r 



01 



How the broadcast media and 
the insurance business are right 
for each other was discussed last 
week, by Robert H. Teter. v.p. 
and director of radio for PGW. 

Teter spoke before the Life Adver- 
tisers Eastern Round Table in New ||j 
York, emphasizing this point: 

"Apatln toward the initial contact 
of the individual insurance salesman 
can be considerably relieved, as many 
insurance, banks and finance compa- 
nies have determined, through pre- I 
education via intelligent use of radio 
and tv." 

Spot broadcasting needs all the 
support it can get: That's the 
theme behind the new ad campaign 
developed bj H-R Reps and H-R fv. 

The promotion will cover the val- 
ues and advantages of spot, plus the 
H-R "Working Partnership'" concej 
ol station representation. 



ii- 



Rep appointments: W 1)1 \. Mem- 
phis, to the Boiling Co. . . . New x t. 
Louis station KPLR-TV, expecting 
to begin broadcasting this month — to 
PGW . . . WGIIN. Grand 1 lax en. 
Mich., to the John E. Pearson Co. 

Personnel notes: Jerry ( ronin. 

to the San Francisco radio sales -I. ill 
of the kal/ \gency . . . William 
Kelley, to \iu Radio Sales as an ac- 
count executive . . . Edward Sherin- 
ian, to the sales staff of ll-K Tv, Inc. 



TV STATIONS 



VRB will continue its Vrbitron 
methodology in New York even 
though it's folded the instantane- 
ous set-up in Chicago and decid- 
ed not to go through with its 
plans for L.A. 

Cause for the Chicago pull-out: 



SPONSOR 



VPRIL 19S9 



Mark 

this 
market 



on your list! 

ENTRAL and SOUTH ALABAMA 
• ••one of 
Alabama's "Big Three" 




WSFA-TV's 
35 Alabama counties* 

Population 1,109,600 

Retail Sales S 770,551,000 

Food Store Sales 200,215,000 

Drug Store Sales 22,215,000 

Automotive Sales 173,331,000 

Gasoline Service Station Sales 68,402,000 

Effective Buying Income 51,146,641,000 




WSFA-TV dominates with 63.1 % average share of audience 
in the second largest Alabama market ... an area no other 
medium or media combination can deliver! 

These ratings were proved in a recent television survey 
conducted for 16 TV stations in 25 Central and South 
Alabama counties! One big reason for this outstanding 
coverage? WSFA-TV has the TOP 60 SHOWS in an area 
of over one million population, with one-third of a million 
automotive registrations! 

Mark Central and South Alabama on your list . . . and 
buy it with WSFA-TY! 




* Market area defined by Television Magazine, plus 6 counties consistently proving 
regular reception. Does not include 3 Georgia and 3 Florida bonus counties. 

Data from Sales Management Survey of Buying Power. May. 19~>S 

THE WKY TELEVISION SYSTEM, INC. • WKY-TV AND WKY OKLAHOMA CITY • WTVT TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 

Represented by the Kate A. 



TELEVISION 

KANSAS 

KTVH 

SERVING XAJwmmW PLUS 
14 OTHER IMPORTANT 
KANSAS COMMUNITIES 




BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 



I 



HUTCHINSON 

STUDIOS IN HUTCHINSON AND WICHITA a 
HOWARD 0. PETERSON, GEN.MGR. 9 




I hree ol the four local i\ >iat i< >n> 
withdrew their support on the ground 
thai nighttime \rbitron showed an 
unsatisfactory sets-in-use. ()nl\ sta- 
tion inclined to go along was \RC 
TV's W BKB. 

ARB's investment loss, accord- 
ing to estimates, could rim over 
$100,000. On the basis of what's 
happened in Chicago and LA. to 
A KB. the industry expectation is that 
Nielsen will keep its own instantane- 
ous audience measurement ~\ -terns 
on the shelf for the time being if not 
forever. 

During its verj brief operation 
Arbitron revealed this interesting 
sidelight on Chicago audiences: pres- 
tige dramatic shows — for instance, 
For Whom the Bell Tolls — don't fare 
anything as well as the) do in New 
York and other kev markets. 

The Corinthian Broadcasting 
Corp. took a major step towards ex- 
panding its news services last week. 
via the addition of a Washington 
News Bureau: News Associates. 

The group, headed by Herb Gor- 
don, will create a special news serv- 
ice tailored to meet the local and 
regional requirements of the Corin- 
thian stations, and will operate un- 
der the direction id each station's 
news director. 

Ideas at work: 

• How the) celebrated their HHh 
anniversary: WTVJ, Miami, ran a 
contest to find all children in the 
area born on the same day the sta- 
tion went on the air, holding a huge 
birthda) parts for the winners. In 
addition, the Miami station has pub- 
lished a magazine dubbed "Ten ^ car 
Report," highlighting each year of 
the stations growth. 

• KSTP-TV, Minneapolis-St. 
Paul, ran a guess-the-number-of-jell) 
beans contest for three weeks, via its 
Treasure Chest show, and netted a 
total of 16,137 entries an average 
of 2,883 per day. The prize: A $500 
Easter wardrobe. 

Business notes: In one ol the larg- 
est single purchases of t\ time in 
\\ e>t (oast annals. Barnhart-Mor- 
row i for it-- food products) signed 
for $1 million worth of commercial 
time on kllJ-TY. Los Vngeles . . . 

Orange ('rush Soft Drink and Home 

Steam Laundry, for segments of The 
Top Ten Dance Party syndicated t\ 



dance series on 
tanooga, Tenn. 



WDEF-TV. (hat 






Thisa "n' data: WXIX, Milwaukee, 
the ("BS uhf er which went dark last 
month, sold to \\ \l\. Inc.. with Gene 
Posner, president. He's also president 
of Cream Citv Broadcasting Co.. li- 
censee of W MIL. Milwaukee . . . 
W JAR-TV, Providence, is sending a 
production crew to Europe to pro- 
duce sound films for its The World 
[round I s series . . . \S T\ T, Tam- 
pa, is sending Germany's Chancellor 
newspaper rulers to ad and agency 
execs.. .New headquarters: ^ KA T, 
Lexington, Ky.. will be moving its 
offices in a couple months. A new 
transmitter will give the station a 
power increase of I'lV* times it- for- 
mer strength. 

Add kudos: Lawrence Rogers, 
president and general manager of 
WSAZ, Inc., presented with a spe- 
cial award at the Advertising Awards 
meeting of the Huntington Ad Club 
for its telecasts of the NCAA Basket- 
hall Tournaments . . . U. S. Army 
awards for The Big Picture, to 
WCBS-TV, New York and KBET- 
T\ , Sacramento . . . National Head- 
liner Club awards to KMOX-TV, St 
Louis and WTAE, Pittsburgh . . . 
Inez Simons, of KTTV, Los An- 
geles, cited with the first place award 
for writing a tv newscast script, hv 
the California Association of Press 
Women. 

On the personnel front: James 
S/.abo. appointed general sales man- 
ager; Robert Adams, assistant sales 
manager; Bill Scharton, national 
sales manager and Murry Salherg. 
to director of advertising and sales 
promotion for WABC-TV, New York 
. . . Charles Hinds. Jr.. to directoi 
of programing for \\ BBM-TV, Chi- 
cago . . . Donald Oninn. named 
general sales manager for W'NTA-TV, 
New ^ oik . . . Richard Dawson, to 
assistant sales manager of KTRK-TV, 
Houston . . . Gene Stewart, to art 
director for KOCO-TV, Oklahoma 
Cit) . . . Richard Roll, to director 
ol news and special events at KENS- 
TV, San Antonio . . . Bill key. to 
director of engineering, KOCO-TV, 
Oklahoma Cilv . . . Mervin Durea. 
to promotion manager of \\IA\ I 

Columbus, O Inlin Coiiomikc- 

appointed sales representative at 
M)k \-l\. Pittsburgh. # 



MO 



SPONSOR 



11 APRIL 1959 



Superlative 
Equipment 

means more viewer attention 






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"*** 



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Radiating effectively from the Raleigh-Durham area 



Good programming attracts viewers — good 
"delivery" holds them! And WRAL-TV pro- 
vides its skilled staff with the finest facilities 

The station is furnished throughout with 
new General Electric equipment. 

There are two mammoth studios, one 60 x 60 
feet and another 60 x 40 feet, each with a 20- 
foot ceiling. 

The studios are equipped with seven cameras, 
a rear-screen projector, and three 70-circuit 
lighting boards. 




A $100,000 remote unit is equipped with 
four cameras. 

North Carolina's first Ampex Videotape re- 
corder provides money-saving advantages with 
"live" quality for commercials and programs. 

Topnotch equipment, staff and studios help 
account for the unequalled rating record of 
WRAL-TV — tops in the Raleigh-Durham 
area. Here's the brightest screen for sales mes- 
sages in central and eastern North Carolina. 

Are you on? 



THE REGIONAL STATION WITH THE REGIONAL PERSONALITY 



WRAL-TV 



Serving the area from 
Greensboro to the coast, 
from Virginia to the 
South Carolina line— a total 
of more than two million 
population 



s^uumeMp 



FULL POWER CHANNEL 5 NBC AND LOCAL COLOR 



Fred Fletcher, Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
Roleigh, North Carolina 



CAROLINA'S Colorful CAPITAL STATION 



REPRESENTED BY H-R, INC. 



INSOR 



11 APRIL 1959 



91 







GEO. HANDLEN 
Popular air salesman 



Another Reason 

KXOA 

NO. 1 

is in 

DYNAMIC 

SACRAMENTO 



Pulse Oct. '58 i Latest Metro) 
Rep: McGavren-Quinn 
VP-Mgr: Howard Haman 




THEY'RE ALL YOURS 
50,000 TV HOMES 



PER 
THOUSAND 



FOR JUST $ I 
ANY TIME— ANY DAY 

With nearly 80% TV saturation in this 
single-station market, you're assured of 
1000 homes reached for every dollar 
spent. Put your next campaign on 

KMSO-TV 

ABC • CBS • NBC 
MISSOULA, MONTANA 

hcture FRO M FORJOE 



NECCO 

I Cont'd from paiie .'!•"> i 

Necco's total distribution). The dime 

bars in grocen stoics arc packaged 
three for a quarter — the nickel bars, 
-i\ for a quarter. 

The specialty line of Canch Cup- 
board chocolates, upper-range priced 
at $1.40 per pound and more, gets 
seasonal gift pushes on tv before im- 
portant candy -giving holidays — 
Christmas, Valentine's Day and East- 
er. Commercials for these boxed 
items are incorporated into the com- 
pany's major-minor pattern of two 
product mentions per tv spot. 

First component in the success of 
the tv campaign, in the opinion of 
Ad Manager Drown, is the excellence 
and uniqueness of the Necco candy 
line. In an industry where many 
candies — particularly bar varieties — 
bear unusual resemblance to each 
other, Necco's line has distinction. 
It also has 112 years of proven per- 
formance! 

These are strong sales points in 
building consumer and broker-retail- 
er acceptance. Canada Mints, devel- 
oped in 1847, was the first candy 
product to be machine-produced in 
this country. And Necco for 7 1 
years has been part of the childhood 
of almost anyone you talk with. The 
22-year-old Sky Bar features four 
molded chocolate sections with a dif- 
ferent filling in each. Its tv success 
forced the company to buy more 
special manufacturing equipment in 
1957 and it needed still another year 
for production to catch up with de- 
mand. The Rolo bar. a chocolate 
cup with creamy colTee filling, was 
the company's first Imported item. 
Necco acquired the franchise From a 
British firm in 1956 and started pro- 
diiclion the following year. 

Rolo's tv debut, says the ad mana- 
ger following good down -the -line 
distribution— "gave us a sales vol- 
ume which approached figures of 
some of our products which had been 
established for 50 years. 

More specific evaluation* ol the tv 
advertising program are being 
planned b\ ihe agenc\ and its top 
Necco account people at LaRoche 
I'bil Cleland, v.p. and account super- 
visor, and Don Shaw, account execu- 
tive. The) know they've had sales 
success with spol television but they 
w ant to detei mine some of the spe- 
cifics, such a< the copy approach 



which best reaches the viewer, the 
contrasts between time periods, cor- 
relation between ad effort and sales. 

Necco continues to gear for expan- 
sion as it prepares blueprints for the 
future. A current move absorbing 
company strategists is conversion 
from two sales forces to one. One 
sales team will now service both the 
Necco and Candy Cupboard lines, >i 
recent switch in field selling. 

Mr. Coffin, as general merchandise 
manager, works with the management 
team — Mr. Drown. Gordon Hentz. di- 
rector of marketing. Charles Me- 
Queeney. market research director, 
and W. Arthur Warren, general sales 
manager — to broaden and deepen the 
inroads which have been made. 

Most of the direct servicing and 
sales bv Necco field men at this point 
is done with grocery store and super- 
market retailers. This amounts to 
about -M)' , of all Necco sales. The 
other 70% of merchandise is sold to 
some 6,500 brokers who. in turn, 
sell and ship the candy products to 
"mom and pop" stores, variety and 
department stores, drug outlets. 

With the increasing competition for 
display space and inventory in these 
many stores, cand) producers have 
been forced to take aggressive actios 
The most progressive companies 
such as those mentioned (Necot 
Sweets. Chunky, M & Ml — are in til 
vanguard of a changing industtj 
which i> evolving from backward ap- 
proaches to forward looks. 

As one cand) industry executive 
said. "The days are going — and han- 
pily! when small. indi\ iduallv- 
owned or family -owned companies 
are thinking in a narrow-minded wa\. 
taking the profits and spending them 
rather than plowing them back into 
the company toward expansion. 

Necco's tv ad expansion is based 
verj simpl) on sales gains. Account 
Supervisor Cleland says "We know 
l\ has moved merchandise. It's helped 
u» establish a brand name, it's givfl| 
ii- ,in all-familj audience at a low 
cost-per-1,000 and it's flexible which 
we. as a sectional advertiser, requira 

( me of his points: "In evaluating 
the worth of advertising we need ■ 
cheek performance over and beyodi 
the selling of goods. We can't dis- 
associate advertising from the ovat> 
all profit picture. 

\il Manager Drown expects to keep 
on investing more mone) in t\ on the 
basis of pasl performance. W 



92 



sroNsoii 



11 APRIL 19 







radio & television 

d a 1 1 a s 



Here is where "quality enters the product 
picture. It is here the trained eye can detect 
and formulate that which makes one product 
stand head and shoulders above the rest. 

There is no laboratory for measuring the 
"quality touch of today's better radio and 
television station operations. And yet, it does 
exist .... to be sensed, sought after, and 
valued by those who know its importance to 
any successful campaign. 



BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS ■ EDWARD PETRV & COMPANY. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

&NSOR • I I IPML 1959 " I 



PROF 
ITAB 







says Martin Umansky, General Manager 

KAKE-TV 

WICHITA, KANSAS 

Every single feature in the 
Warner Bros, library is profit- 
able, according to KAKE-TV's 
General Manager, Martin 
Umansky. 

"The value of any library 
depends not on the top 
features alone, but on 
the entire list. Out of 
the Warner Bros, library, 
we've created a special 
afternoon theatre show- 
ing only the so-called 
'lesser' features. This 
program alone has prac- 
tically paid for the entire 
library of 750 features." 

The Warner Bros, library has 
made outstanding profits for 
stations, large and small, in 
every part of the country. Join 
the profit parade. Get in touch 
with us today. 

u.a.a. 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 

NEW YORK, 345 Madison Ave., MUrray Hill 6-2323 
CHICAGO, 75 E. Wacker Dr., DEarborn 2-2030 
DALLAS, 1511 Bryan St., Riverside 7-8553 
LOS ANGELES, 9110 Sunset Blvd.CRestview 6-5886 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 





Alan D. Courtney lias been elected v.p., 
nighttime programs, for NBC TV. He has 
been director of nighttime programs since 
September. 1957. Courtne) joined NBC in 
L.A. in 1947. and transferred to the station 
relations department in N. Y. in 1952. He 
was named sales and programing adminis- 
trator for the web's Today. Home and To- 
night shows in 1955 and executive produc- 
er of the Steve Allen Show in 1956. Also appointed: Carl Linde- 
mann, Jr.. to v.p., daytime programs for NBC TV. With the network 
since 1948, Lindemann was formerly director of daytime programs. 

Rolland V. Tooke, Cleveland area v.p. of 
the Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. in 
charge of KYW-AM-TV since 1956. has 
been appointed executive v.p. of W BC. 
Tooke entered the tv industi \ in 1941 when 
Philadelphia's WPTZ was operated b\ the 
Philco Corp. He was named assistant gen- 
eral manager of that station in L945, and 
general manager in 1953 — the time the 
station was purchased b) Westinghouse. Tooke is a member of the 
T\ Pioneers of America. He was graduated from the Wharton 
School. U. of Pa., and served with the \a\\ during World War II. 

Hugh B. Terry, president and general 
manager of KLZ-TV, Denver (a subsidiary 
of Time. Inc. I. aeeepled for his station last 
week, the Alfred 1. duPont t\ award. The 
significance: KLZ i- the onl\ station to 
win this award for the second time — the 
first being in L948 for radio. \ long-time 
industry leader. Hugh Terry, has been the 
recipient of main awards for his station, 
among them being the Peabod) and Sigma Delta Chi awards pre- 
sented last year. Another duPont winner is WSNY, Schenectw 

Lionel F. Baxter has been named director 

,.| coast-to-coast radio operation- ol Storer 

Broadcasting Co. effective 1 June. Baxter 

u;i> lonneiK v.p. and managing director ol 

\\ [BG, Philadelphia and will continue in 

this position until a successoi Is appointed. 

Baxter has established an outstanding 

record as a sales-getter and manager and 

has broughl W IBG into a leading position 

f importance in the Philadelphia market. In his new position. Baxter 

will report to William I.. Bine. Storer v.p. in charge of radio. 





91 



SPONSOR 



ll ipril 1959 




■7aj \y*$iQ 




♦ — I — 



r* r ci 







L 



ove that 

WWJ coverage! 

Seventy per cent of 
Michigan's population 
commanding 75 per cent 
of the state's buying 
power lives within W WJ's 
daytime primary cover- 
age area. 



lphabet 



EGYPTIAN 

From a multitude of pictograms, 
ideograms, and phonograms, the 
modern alphabet developed 
through the ages. For example, 
our letter I probably started as 
the Egyptian sign for cord. 



PHOENICIAN 

Devising a rude alphabet from 
the complex jungle of Egyptian 
signs, the Phoenicians created 
about 20 letters. The symbol for 
cord became their letter lamed 
(ox goad). 



GREEK 

Using the basic Phoenician sym- 
bols, the Greeks changed the 
form of some letters and devised 
a few of their own. In the process, 
lamed became lambda. 



ROMAN 

The alphabet traveled to the 
Etruscans and then to the Romans. 
Again, some letters were altered, 
new ones added. From the Greek 
lambda, the Romans created the 
modern 1, 



Historical data by 
Dr. Donald J. Lloyd, 
Wayne State University 



L 

LA 




Long-time leadership makes WWJ your 

Basic Radio Buy in the Detroit-Southeastern Michi- 
gan Market. To its 81 per cent adult audience, WWJ 
represents modern radio entertainment and service at its 
very best. 

Liven your Detroit Campaign with salesmaking 
personalities like Hugh Roberts, Faye Elizabeth, Dick French, 
Bob Maxwell, and Jim DeLand — with product displays at 
WWJ's exclusive "radio-vision'' studios at Northland and 
Eastland Shopping Centers. Buy WWJ — it's the basic 
thing to do! 



h jb w m m tm m AM and FM 

WWJ RADIO 

Detroit's Basic Radio Station 

Owned ond operated by The Detroit News 

NBC Affiliate 
National Representatives: Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



PONSOR 



1 1 mm. L959 



95 



s 



: 



Attacks on radio news 

\- radio assumes more and more leadership in-the-pres- 
entation of news on a local and community level, it is inevi- 
table that its position will he strenuously attacked. 

Such attacks reached a new high in bitterness last week 
in Cleveland when the Cleveland News took front-page edi- 
torial space to denounce its radio competition. 

The Cleveland paper ridiculed both the amount and qual- 
ity of radio station news coverage and and suggested that 
newscasts are inadequate because they come from private 
sponsors "with natural reservations about controversial 
matters." 

Such an allegation is, of course, completely unfair and 
not based on facts. Radio station men know full well that 
sponsor interference with news material is so rare as to be 
almost non-existent. But the charge is a good example of the 
lengths to which some newspapers apparently will go in their 
efforts to smear the air media. 

We suggest that radio, far from being disheartened by such 
attacks, should strengthen its determination to provide th? 
nation with its most thorough, comprehensive, convenient 
news coverage. 

Obviously, the newspapers are feeling the effect of radio 
competition, or they woidd not be squawking so loudly. 

Spot's paperwork jungle 

In this issue (page 10) SPONSOR concludes a two-part 
article on the "paperwork jungle" which agencies lace in 
buying spot radio and >pot t\ campaigns. 

It i- a tribute to spot's vitality and value as an advertising 
medium that it has managed to build up it> present volume in 
• pile of the exasperating, time-consuming, back-breaking de- 
iils which are involved in spot purchasing. 

But il LS imdoubtedl) line that spot would enjO) even 

i ter prosperity il it could be made easier to buy. We call 

ery station operator and representative to redouble 

In i irts t<> simplify and streamline his spol operation. 



this we fight for: Realistic rate struc- 
tures for both branches <>l air media, with rea- 
sonable rales based mi advertising values, and 
rate policies which are lair, just and equitable. 




96 






lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Unpop tunes: \n adman suggests a 
record album called, Music To Re- 
sign Accounts By. Some possibH 
titles— 
I've Had it 

That's All I Want From You 
The High and The Mighty 
Long Before I Knew You 
The Great Pretender 
I Don't Hurt Anymore 
There II Be A o Teardrops Tonight 
Hearts of Stone 

More unpops: To give equal time to 

ad clients, here's another album 

called. Music To Drop Agencies By, 

which might include these titles — 

Gotta Travel On 

The Happy Wanderer 

There'll Be Some Changes Made 

The Party's Over 

Let Me Go, Lover 

Wrong, Wrong, Wrong 

Don't Blame Me 

Because of You 

Cry Me a River 

It Only Hurts for a Little While 

Why not? Letter requesting per- i 
mission to remove an object from 
premises received by the super of a 
Madison Avenue building from a tv 
production firm — 
•'Dear Sir: 

Please pass one casket for a small 
thin midget." 

Code of the West: Mark Foster, 
program director of \\ GST, Atlanta, 
tells of the 10-year-old tv Western 
fan who turned in to his teacher a 
drawing of a cowbo) walking into a 
saloon. The teacher objected to the 
subject matter, felt it not good taste 
in one so \oung to have included the 
saloon. "Hut he's not going in lor a 
drink." said the hoy; "he's just going 
in to -hoot somebodj . 

Quote: "I should be a Piel Brothers 

fan inn name heing IVale spelled 
the right wa\ i but I don'l approve of 
liter ads."' Dr. Norman \ incent 
Peale in 7 / Guide. 

Switcheroo: Thud. KDK\. Pitts- 
burgh, "magazine of brick throw' 
carries a parod} ad <>f a deep-sea 
diver with the caption. "A Sinking 
Man s Smoke." Reminding us of the 
restaurant sign: "\ Thinking Man's 
Gefilte Fish." 



r 



Kiel 



The I 



SPONSOR 



11 kpril 1959 



II 




NAMES 



KETV 



NUMBER ONE 

IN NIGHTTIME OMAHA 

"he Latest N.S.I. Feb., '59, Omaha Metro Area, Sun. Thru Sat., 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. 

KETV. . . 42 

Station B 26 

Station C 31 

he Latest N.S.I. Feb., '59, Omaha Metro Area, Sun. Thru Sat., 9:00 P.M. to Midnight 

KETV. . . 40 

Station B 23 

Station C 36 



3UY OMAHA'S PRIME-TIME LEADER! 



Call 






Now! 



IC TELEVISION NETWORK 



KE 



CI^v^ckssvvkqSIs 



7 



Ben H. Cowdery, President Eugene S. Thomas, Vice President and General Manager Omaha World-Herald Station 




WIN^ leads in advertisei acceptance — hilling 50% above 1957. 

WIINo leads in audience acceptance. Delivers more adult listeners 
per dollar than any other station. 

WINw leads in balanced programming — news — music — sports — 
special events — community service. 

• RADIO CIRCLE • NEW YORK • JUDSON 2-70Q 

"NEW YORK'S MOST IMPORTANT STATION" 

I Im.\ McCaw, President • H. G. (Jock) Fearnhead, V.l\ and General Manage! • fack Kelly, Sales Manager 

Represented l>\ The Katz Agency, lm 



r A'D.-ll VOH walls 



-45 



40< a copy • $• a yaar 



SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 







lakes Richmond! 



hnuary-February '59 
JLSE shows us. . . 




IRVIN G. ABELOFF 
Vice-President 



HARVEY HUDSON 
General Manager 



't Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 

Clarke Brown Co. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, New Orleans. 
Daren F. McGavren Co. in Chicago. Boston, Detroit and on West Coast. 



FSR AGENCY'S 
'DYNAMIC USE 
OF AIR MEDIA 

How a 52-year old ad 
firm developed an en- 
tirely new approach 
to radio/t\ -el ling 



' 



Page 31 




Big shakeup in 
fall programs on 
tv networks 

Page 33 

How radio helped 
to build a $51 
million bank 

Page 39 

The truth about 
radio's edge 
over newspapers 

Page 42 





["he refreshing sound ol KliK, isn'i intended lo "send" |unior. 
linl it dots provide freedom (rom frenzy I'oi "squares" . . . the inn tint people 
"in product. Melodic populai music ol toda\ and 
rday, plus award winning news, captures .1 01 l, (l adult audience 
(Pulse, I in . 1 in •_'.". I Southern California inarkel areas. Viul .1 campaign 
on KliK. averages 71' »sl than on stations with comparable reach 

1 1 s the mosi /irofttahle radio coverage you i .111 l>u\ .' 






I In Kc I k sin 11- s. mi 1 ul ill Radio 



Hike in. nun 



JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO., INC. 

N.it WEED b COMPANY 



I III 1! III. 1 • 




I IOIIwmuhI : 



■ 



Sell the Southwest' s 

4 -STATE CORNER 

TEXAS • ARKANSAS • OKLAHOMA • LOUISIANA 

from 
AT f^ Ml f^ T%# TEXARKANA 

f\^^ WW II ^^^ ™ ^f TEXAS-ARKANSAS 







29 COUNTY MARKET 

(NCS NO. 3, Spring, 1958) 

WEEKLY COVERAGE 

Total homes reached 

OAY or NIGHT: 64,1 10 

County figures indicate percent 
of television homes which view 
KCMC once or more WEEKLY. 

MARKET DATA 

Population (SROS) 606,500 

Retail Sales (SROS) $481,071,000 

Total Homes (NCS NO. 3) 173,000 

Television Homes (NCS NO. 3) 110,000 

SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

64.8% in Metro Texarkona 
(ARB, November, 1958) 



v\ 



|PUSHMATAHA 

iMcCURTAIN 
45 

OKLAHOMA 



45 



100 



*# 



LAMAR 
29 



RED 
RIVER 



POLK 
69 



MONTGOMERY 
69 



tSr- '*'!&* 



[HOWARD 

iEVIER? 
100 \ 10 ° 



„„„PIM 

1 I dCLARK' 



iOO 



*'VERtj 



HEMP- 
STEAD 
97 



24 



NEVADA 
96 



,0 ° JBOWIE 
TEXAS 



ARKANSAS 

M.LLERI-Jr,- 
luu X 7YETTE /COLUMBIA 

TEXARKANA 



OUACHITA 

2 S 



BOS A *£B- ICLAIBORNE 
%STCR 

*i L, I3 

LOUISIANA 

21 



FLASH! 






MGM Movie Package 
started March 1 



A few choice 
availabilities 
still remain! 




KGMGTV 

TEXARKANA, Texas-Arkansas 

The 4-State POWERHOUSE of the Great Southwest 

Maximum power Channel 6 • Represented by Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 



sponsor • lo APRIL L959 



© Vol. 13, No. 16 • 18 April 1959 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

The Fuller & Smith & Ross air strategy 

31 Now in it- 52nd year, tin- ad agency met air media head-on. developed 
a whole new evaluation t hat could set a pattern for similar agencies 



Tv nets launch big show shakeup 

33 -Network-, scrambling for audience dominance next season, have already 
tilled most iif the nighttime -lot-. \ third oi the shows are new ones 



Screen Gems' formula for tv film success 

36 The loth anniversary this week of Columbia Pictures' tv arm spotlights 
a pattern, realized under Ralph Cohn. for horizontal diversification 

Radio helps banks get volume quickly 

39 Hire'- wh) mure and more hank- turn to air media as the way to im- 
prove their deposit and loan situation, at the same time to cut rising costs 

TvB challenges that Post ad 

40 TvB's Dr. Leon Arons points out the fallacies of recent Satevpost ad, 
cautions admen to follow Post cue and READ -tndv before using il 



Radio vs. newspaper audiences 

42 Though it- pei -broadca-t ratings aren't big, radio's cumulative audience 
tops newspaper on their home grounds — and radio gets out farther too 

Tv remotes give department store a showcase 

44 Nashville store sells mink stoles among other items via -ix daily 60- and 
30-seeond remotes on consistent basis, uses I.D.'s foi special splurge* 

sponsor asks: How do you feel about the "equal 
time" problem? 

52 With the recent rij:i<l FCC ruling on the "equal time" requirement for 
political candidates, three station men tell sponsor theii reactions 



FEATURES 



58 Film Si ope 

24 l'n|, and Madison 

62 News & I'l'. i W rap-1 p 

6 Newsmakei of the Week 

62 I'i. tin. ■■ rap-1 p 

lO Sponsoi Bai kstage 

60 Sponsoi Hears 



17 Sponsor-Scope 

76 Sponsoi Speaks 

50 Spol Buys 

76 I ni Second Spots 

8 I imebuyi u - al Work 

74 T\ and Radio Newsmakers 

57 Washington Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL. DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Milcsch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowirz 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 
Art Editor 

Mau:y Kurtz 
Production Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 
Viklti Viskniskki, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiqqins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Dorris Bowers, Administrative Mqr. 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mqr. 

Georqe Becker; Charles Eckert: Gilda 

Gomez; Priscilla Hoffman; Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
>49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. S8 a year. Canada & 
other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a year. 
Other Foreign Countries $11 per year. Single 
copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all cor- 
respondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y 
MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by SPON- 
SOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at 
Baltimore. Md. 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 




Play 

it 
cool! 



Drum up more sales with ABC Radio's 
giant summertime promotion! 



"Play It Cool!" is strictly a summer promotion, 
conceived for the specific purpose of selling 
warm-weather products - like easy-to-prepare 
foods, air conditioners and freezers, suntan 
lotion, deodorants, soft drinks, beer, automotive 
and travel products. 

Feature No. 1: The commercial for your prod- 
uct will be adjacent to editorial matter per- 
taining directly to your product. And ABC 
will schedule additional on-the-air promo- 
tional spots in other time periods to stim- 
ulate consumer demand. 

Feature No. 2: ABC will conduct a large-scale 
merchandising campaign (both advertising 
and direct mail) beamed at your best cus- 
tomers. The campaign will tell them your 
product is being advertised through the 
"Play It Cool" promotion, and offer point- 
of-sale and tie-in material. 

Join the growing list of sponsors who have al- 
ready signed up. For full information, contact 
your ABC Radio representative or write: 



ABC 

RADIO 

NETWORK 



*PONSOK 



18 April L959 



7 West 66th St., New York 23, N. Y. 

3 



NOW AVAILABLE: NTA'S NEW 
PACKAGE OF THE IMPORTANT 
POST 1948 FEATURE FILMS! 

Here are hand-picked Feature Films from the 
top studios of the world — hand-picked for 
action appeal, top quality appeal, big name 
appeal. Alec Guinness, Audrey Hepburn, 
Jayne Mansfield, Maria Schell, Montgomery 
Clift, Jennifer Jones, James Stewart, typify 
the compelling top-star, top-draw look of 
every one of these features. And the David 
0. Selznick name behind a number of the 
pictures gives you an idea of the production 
credits each of these top quality films carry. 

ALL THIS, AND SHIRLEY, TOO 

You've asked for them! Now you have them: 
six of Shirley Temple's biggest box office 
smashes. * It's the first time that these clas- 
sic attractions have been made available on 
a market by market basis. Only available in 
the big new International Package from NTA. 

NTA INTERNATIONAL, INC. 

Subsidiary of National Telefilm Associates, Inc. 
Ten Columbus Circle, New York 19, JU 2-7300 




X 






'Captain January, Poor Little Rich Girl, Wee Willie Winkie, Heidi, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Little Miss Broadway 



Did 

Someone 
Call Us?" 




They sure did . . . It all started when Balti 
more's Mondawmin Shopping Center chose Bob 
Keeshan f Captain Kangaroo) to be the host 
to thousands of children and grownups alike 
at their three-show o day promotion festivity, 
Saturday, March 21st . . . Stu Kerr, talented 
WMAR-TV personality happened to mention 
that both Keeshan and he had been buddies 
together os a network's page boys . . . The 
CBS Television Network and Bob's agent were 
immediately contacted, arranging for a very 
special on-air reunion for Stu with his ol' pal, 
Captain Kangaroo, that same Saturday morn- 
ing, with WMAR-TV actually ci eating a pro- 
gram at 8:45 AM for the two gentlemen to 
get together, 3/4's of an hour ahead of the 
regular scheduling for that day. Monitors, 
cameras, and the station's mobile unit were 
sent to Mondawmin, along with a station 
news photographic unit to record a newsreel of 
this occasion, later having been shown through- 
out the week on various Channel 2 programs 
. . . and the children, after learning of this 
through on-air and newspaper publicity releases 
and advertising, flocked to the Sun papers 
Television studios to see their favorite Channel 
2, CBS personality and their Uncle Stu enjoy 
an informal on-air chit-chat . . . This was 
another example of WMAR-TV's versatility and 
willinqness to bring interesting local television 
into the Channel Two viewers' homes during 
this exclusive Captain Kongaroo-Stu Kerr re- 
union, through the cooperation of the CBS 
Promotion Department and Bob Keeshan „ . . 
Captain Kangaroo himself. 




Contact Your KATZ Rep. Now! 




SUNPAPERS TELEVISION, BALTIMORE, MD. 
6 






NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



The expanding creative horizons of the agency media direc- 
tor, particularly in the radio tv programing area, was spot- 
lighted this ueek by the appointment of (herald T. Arthur as 
vice president in charge of media at Donahue & Coe. Arthur 
has made a reputation Ity his imaginative use of air and print. 

The newsmaker: Gerald T. Arthur is a symbol of that 
breed of media director, who, spurred b\ the post-war revolution in 
marketing, has taken media buying out of the dusty corner it once 
occupied. Where the media director once administered an essen- 
tially isolated operation, he now looks at media as part of the 
complex nexus of product, message, market and distribution — not to 
mention keeping an c\c on what the competition is doing. 

I he fact Arthur is onl\ 33 onl\ makes the point more pertinent, tm 
Arthur has distinguished himself b\ looking at air media in the 
broadest possible terms at Fuller 
& Smith & Ross. He was plucked 
from there b\ an agency suddenly 
determined to bring itself to the 
attention of the advertising world. 
lli> appointment is the climax 
to a series of personnel additions 
and promotions at Donahue & 
Coe. These have been coming so 
fast that, a> D&C's own press re- 
lease on Arthur said, the ''p.r. de- 
partment fell behind in announc- 
ing the arrivals as the) came in. 

Arthur was chosen following a 
search made b\ D&C to determine who arc the crack executives and 
potential executive- in all area- of the business. He was described 
b\ the agencv as one of two media people who stood out above 
all the others. 

This frenetic activity at D&C ir- interpreted by the trade as I 
include to the retirement of Edward .1. Churchill, now president, 
and the moving up of Waller Weir, now executive v.p. Weir makes 
no secret of the fact that D&C is oul to bolster the agency's package 

g Is billing, an intriguing ambition in the lighl of the fact that 

Jerrj Arthur is leaving an agenc) heavj in the industrial goods field. 
\ithur will be given a free band in revamping the media de- 
partment. He will be the first D&C media director with authority 
over both prinl and air buyers. In addition to hi> stripes, \rthur 
will be a member of the plans board and will also work with DM - 
new business committee. W ith DM! increasing its share of air bill- 
ing \ it Inn will also be active in the tv programing area. ^ 




Gerald T. Arthur 



-n>\Miii 



18 \prii. 1 ( ^9 



NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 




Ask your East/man for documented proof 
of outstanding sales results thru 
Adult Type Programming 
on KTOK. 




robert e. eastman & co., 



inc. 



national representatives of radio stations 



NEW YORK: 

527 Madison Avenue 
New York 22. N. Y. 
PI aza 9-7760 



CHICAGO: 

333 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago. Illinois 
Financial 6-7640 



SAN FRANCISCO: 
Russ Bldg. 
San Francisco. Cal. 
YUkon 2-9760 



DALLAS: 

211 North Ervay Bldg. 
Dallas. Texas 
Riverside 7-2417 



ST. LOUIS: 

Syndicate Trust Bldg. 
915 Olive St. 
St. Louis. Missouri 
CEntral 1-6055 




ONSOR 



18 april 1959 



The Dy 



mamtc 



Little Rock 
Story 

of Radio Acceptance! 




It's KVLC all the Way; 

Here's why: 

• Top f lite programming 

• Outstanding personalities 

• Instant news coverage via 
news cruisers 

• Satisfied year-after-year advertisers 

DO BUSINESS WHERE BUSINESS 

IS BEING DONE! 
Cet the KVLC Success Story Today! 

NATIONAL REPS.: 

• New York City 
Richard O'Connell, Inc. 

• Chicago 
William J. Reilly 

• Kansas City — St. Louis 
Jack Hetherington 

. . . and in nearby 

LAKE CHARLES, LA. 

it's 



! 





Reaching a booming market of 250.000. 
Annual retail sales $200,000,000. 



NOW 



Special 15".. discount on this 

potent combination . . . 

KVLC, Little Rock • KIKS, lake Charles 






.0 



Timebuye 
at work 




Berry Share, Batten. Barton. Durstine & Osborn, Inc.. San Fran- 
cisco, feels there is a tremendous need to simplify radio buying.1 
"The large number of stations, the diversity of rate structures andl 
the constant!) changing complexion of stations makes radio the niostj 
difficult and time-consuming medium to buy today," Betty saysJ 
"There has been a good sound ef- 
fort by many stations to simplify 
rate cards, but there are still wide 
differences in essential structures 
and too many unpublished pack- 
ages. I hope to see the day when 
there is uniformity in rate cards. 
Also, buying would improve if lit- 
erature on programing and station 
personality improved." On the 
other hand. Betty says, agencies 
can help simplify the buying proc- 
ess by stating clearly to stations 
and reps the objectives of a campaign, and providing the essential 
details, so that the stations will submit the right proposal from th<| 
beginning. "I believe that in the next few years stations will stream] 
line their selling mechanics to cope with the growing competition.! 



Eugene J. Crealish, Bryan Houston. Inc.. New York, all-medij 
buyer, notes that with the warm months approaching and the usua 
schedules of re-runs or "test" summer replacement shows begimn 
to appear, the various shifts and changes in television viewing liahit 
musl be taken into consideration. "During the summer months,' 

Gene sa\s. "the pattern of tv view 

jdA Mix change:.. .iikI must be allowe< 

M ^ for b\ the seasonal as well as thi 

year-round advertiser in this me 
dium."" There is a general shifl 
Gene sa\s. in block viewing habit 
from earh morning to late evenin| 
viewing, depending upon the gecj 
graphic location of the market an* 
the working hours of it- peop 

" Accordingly, the advertisi i ofl 
adjust his schedules to the -mum 

season. Often individual annoio] 
ments dining late afternoon schedules thai were ignored during 
winter months become ver) good bins during the summer. B\ th 
same token, the efficient earl) spot bu) of the winter months 
lose it- audience to outdoor life and the barbecue pit. Effective su 
mer Inning requires a careful appraisal of each individual market 



\ '.r n*- f 




Sl'ONSOK 



18 APRIL 195 







... of the two top radio personalities in Chicago 



During March, both Howard Miller and John Dorennis joined 
he line-up of star personalities on WMAQ Radio. Miller's selec- 
ions of popular music and informal comment have made him 
he Number One radio personality in Chicago, without interrup- 
ion. since January 1956. ■ Doremus, in Chicago for less than 
:wo years, quickly became the city's Number Two radio-audience 
ittraction, by featuring the best sort of popular music. ■ So the 



Q for QUALITY Radio in Chicago is now bigger than ever! The 
two biggest radio personalities in the city are now at 670 on 
Chicago's radio dial. ■ Howard miller, 9:05 to 11:00 a.m.. 
Monday through Friday. JOHN DOREMUS, 4:05 to 5:30 p.m.. 
Monday through Friday and 9:05 to 10:30 p.m., week nights. 



NBC RADIO IN CHICAGO 
SOLD BY NBC SPOT S ILES 



WMAQ • 670 



Source: Pulse. Xot-.Dec. '58 



SPONSOR 



18 APRIL 1959 













JMJKSONI 
MBSSISSIfPI 

Katz 

\LBT\ 3 

Hollingbery 



if. tmmmam t,»**mh\, ii. m 



LO 









by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 




Admen, harness that beat! 

Just about every seat in the Brooklyn Fox 
I heatre was occupied for the opening perform- 
ance of the Alan Freed 5th Anniversary Big Beat 
Easter Show that Fridaj (27 March). On second 
thought, it s not quite precise to sa\ the seats 
were occupied. The) were, but oiil\ for a small 
part of the time. Most of the time, their occu- 
pants, 90% of whom were young girls in their 
teens, weren't in the seats at all. The) were on their feet screaming, 
and waving their right hands, like a huge classroom of little lasses 
suddenly and simultaneously seized with a desperate need to \ i>it 
the rest room, and requesting teachers" permission. 

It occurred to me that this demonstrated, among other points, a 
measure of influence wielded In radio and or television performers 
often overlooked, and even more often underestimated In advertisers 
and agencies who seek personalities to sell their wares in the broadcast 
media. The show was. to begin with, a reiteration of the fact that one 
radio personality, Alan Freed, had been and continued to be va>tl\ 
responsible, for better or worse, for introducing, popularizing and 
establishing a new form of music for Americas young. Music with 
the Big Beat, or rock and roll, if you insist. 

You may not like it. hut it sells 

Whether you or I like rock and roll, or big beat music land 1 do 
like the best of it I . is beside my point of the moment. M\ point is 
that here was a radio personality, Mr. r reed, who had enough in- 
fluence to pla) a major part in establishing a new American musical 
form. Certain!) that influence should be recognized and properly 
harnessed In thinking advertisers and their agencies. \nd. of course, 
to a large extenl it is. But if Mr. Freed's influence was apparent from 
the fact that the largish Brooklyn theater was jam-packed, that was 
a rather obvious influence. Not quite as obvious was another in- 
llucncc. far more potent than Mr. Freed's. Not onl) not quite as 
obvious, but I would venture to sa\. largel) unknown to most adver- 
tisers and agencies. I speak of the influence of a \ming \B( l\ 
network personality named Dick Clark. 

It is infrequentl) enough that we typewriter-pounders have the op- 
portunit) to take legitimate bows, so I hasten to sneak one in for 
myself right here. When ABC T\ originall) put young Mr. (Mark on 
the network, I believe I was the first radio t\ writing man to note 
thai he was a bust-oul smash, thai he would prove to be one of the 
most dynamic and powerful salesmen t\ had ever seen. He b.i~ 
proved that, and he will continue on to prove to the doubters thai his 
shows attract grown-ups as well as teen audiences, and that \\\> sales 
effectiveness is as great with the elders as with their offspring. 

i I { i - i 1 1 l; from the sweeping anil inunode-l curtS) I have just made. 
I continue on i he point of the vast influence of Mr. Clark, i It is eas) 



sroNsoK 



18 \im;ii. L959 



Your Salesman for More Than 700,000 

CALLS ON SIGHT IN THE SOUTHEAST'S 
BIGGEST, RICH MARKET 




TELEVISION 

WINSTON-SALEM 



Put your salesman where he can make the most 
calls at less cost. Buy WSJS-television's 713,062 
TV sets in 75 Piedmont Counties in 
North Carolina and Virginia. 




Winston-Salem 
fj for <j Greensboro 
High Point 



AFFILIATE 



Call Hcadlcy-Rccd 



PONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 



11 



WHLI 

w 

'THE VOICE OF LONG ISLAND 1 

Tremendous 
summer 
bonus 
audience 



9,000,000 

summer visitors 

300,000 

additional summer 
residents 



plus 



1,811,000 

regular Nassau-Suffolk 
residents 

(A Major year-round markets 



SPECIAL SUMMER 
PROGRAMMING: 

news, weather and temperature, 
traffic, boating, fishing, 
swimming information 




has the largest daytime audience 

in the Major Long Island Market 

(Pulse) 



>10,000 WATTS 

WHLI 



MIMfSTIAD E^E«%fl 
Repreitnlrd by Gill-P«rno 



12 



Sponsor backstage continued 






enough to null out vour Nielsen pocket piece and see that American 
Bandstand, J)ick"s Monday through Friday, 4 to 5:30 p.m. extrava- 
ganza on ABC TV has a multi-weekly rating for January and Febru- 
ary of 11.8 for each month, and thus is the number two multi-weeklj 
show in all of television. I don't have my figures hand\ . hut it's easy 
enough to check and learn that his Saturday night show represents 
one of the healthiest cost-per-1,000 buys in the business. 

I hese statistics are strong evidence of his popularity, but do not 
give anywhere near as crystal-clear a picture of his vast influence as 
did the show at the Brooklyn Fox. There were 19 big beat acts on the 
Freed bill for that show. All of them had had at least one hit or near 
hit. record. There were top favorites in the field, like Fats Domino 
and Bobby Darin. And the little girls screeched in ecstasy, trembled 
for virtually every one of the 19. 

But the one they screeched for at their uninhibited orgiastic peak, 
the one they all but fainted over was a 16-year old boy from Phila- 
delphia named Fabian. Not Sam Fabian, not Fabian Jones, just plain 
Fabian. Fabian is a modest young high school junior, who has been 
a singer and performer for a relatively short time, maybe six months 
or a year. Under the expert guidance of his managers, a couple of 
fellows named Bob Marcurri and Pete DeAngelis. he has become 
this hot a showbusiness property: 

Alan Freed ran an ad in the tradepapers. following the close of 
the Brooklyn Fox engagement, in which he said: 

"Thanks. Fabian (of Chancellor Records) . . . The Alan Freed 
5th Anniversary Big Beat Easter Show at the Brooklyn Fox Theatre 
broke every existing house record (of any Brooklyn Theatre) for a 
single day's gross of $27.000 — (signed) Alan Freed . . . P.S. and 
thanks again, Fabian for canceling previous commitments to return 
by popular demand for the closing Saturday and Sunday shows." 

. . . and last Saturday (4 April), if you watched the Perry Como 
show, you would have seen the handsome young Fabian, do his new 
hit record, "Turn Me Loose" on that show. 

This hot showbusiness property is almost exclusively a Dick Clan 
creation. Dick has had him on his Bandstand many, many times 
and Dick has made him a young star in vast demand. To be able 
to accomplish this. 1 believe, speaks far more eloquently for a per- 
sonality's talent for influencing viewers than all the ratings in the 
world. \nd this phase "1 the influence of radio t\ performers" per- 
sonalities is often overlooked l>v agencies and advertisers. 

Good influence outweighs bad 

It is heartening, in the face of the blasting the big beat so oftflfl 
take- from the public, to he able to sav that most of those involved 
in the picture wield their influence for considerable good. Clark, 
himself, works tirelessly and in main ways to exert his influence in 
the direction of helping the v oung people with their problem-. \n<l 
just one other example of a most influential new talent to en i 
from the vouthful popular music field, one who has probabK exerted 
more influence for the good of young boys and girls than a thousand 
slilT-necked viewers-w ith-alai m all put together, is Pat Boone. Pat'a 
influence has been harnessed by one smart advertiser. ( hevrolet 
Pal not only sells cars, but via his best-selling book. "Twixt the Teem 
and Twenty," and his general behavior he helps make better citizen! 
out of untold thousands of our voting people. ^ 



SPONSOR 



18 april 1959 




. . . ON A BILLION-DOLLAR TARGET! 



WSPD Radio's across-the-board leadership in 
the billion-dollar Toledo market continues to 
give advertisers more sales ammunition for their 
dollar. All-time high ratings are the result of 
WSPD's forward march in its 38-year domination 
of Toledo, attained by consistently aggressive pro- 
gramming and promotion. 

To bulls-eye Toledo's billion dollars, depend 
on the one station to score — and keep scoring! 
Ask your KATZ man for details. 

Storer ^Radio (m 



"Famous on the local scene 

WSPEfe 

NBC RADIO in TOLEDO <J, 



WSPD WJW WJBK WOBS WAGA WWVA WIBO 
Toledo Cleveland l>.ir..,i Miami Atlanta Wheeling Philaddphii 



•ONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 



13 




SUMMEtfRADIO GOE! 





I I 



VHERE THE FAMILY GOES 



You reach people-wherever they are, 
at home or on vacation -with SPOT 
RADIO. 




SPONSORED BY MEMBER EIRMS OF 



Avery-Knodel Inc. — John Blair & Company — Broadcast Time Sales 

Thomas F. Clark Co. Inc. — Harry E. Cummings — Robert E. Eastman & Co. Inc. 

H-R Representatives Inc. — The Katz Agency Inc. — McGavren-Quinn Company 

The Meeker Company Inc. — Art Moore Associates Inc. — Richard O'Connell Inc. 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. — William J. Reilly. Inc. 

Radio-TV Representatives Inc. — Weed Radio Corporation — Adam Young Inc. 




WINNERS 




ASCAP congratulates the 1958 Winners 

"GIGI" 

FREDERICK LOEWE - ALAN JAY LERNER 
PUBLISHED BY CHAPPELL & CO., INC. 




<"A.M.P.A.S 



ASCAP Academy winners since 1931+ : 

1934 — "The Continental" — Con Conrad, Herbert Magidson 

1935 — "Lullaby of Broadway" — Harry Warren, Al Dubin 

1936 — "The Way You Look Tonight" — Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields 
1937-"Sweet Leilani" — Harry Owens 

1938 — "Thanks for the Memory" -Ralph Ranger, Leo Robin 

1939 -"Over the Rainbow" -E. Y. Harburg, Harold Arlen 

1940-"When You Wish Upon A Star" — Ned Washington, Leigh Harline 

1941 -"The Last Time I Saw Paris" -Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein 2nd 

1942 — "White Christmas"- Irving Berlin 

1943 -"You'll Never Know" -Harry Warren, Mack Gordon 

1944 — "Swinging On A Star"-James Van Heusen, Johnny Burke 

1 945 — "It Might As Well Be Spring" -Rodgers and Hammerstein 

1946 — "On the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe"-H. Warren, J. Mercer 

1947 — "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah" — Allie Wrubel, Ray Gilbert 

1 948 — "Buttons and Bows"-Jay Livingston, Ray Evans 

1949 — "Baby. It's Cold Outside" -Frank Loesser 
1950 -"Mona Lisa" -Ray Evans, Jay Livingston 

1951 -"In the Cool Cool Cool of the Evening"-H. Carmichael, J. Mercer 

1952 — "Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin' " — Dimitri Tiomkin, Ned Washington 

1953 — "Secret Love"-Sammy Fain, Paul Webster 

1954 — "Three Coins in the Fountain"-Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne 

1955 -"Love is a Many Splendored Thing" -Paul Francis Webster, Sammy Fain 

1956 "Whatever Will Be, Will Be" ('Que Sera, Sera')-Ray Evans, Jay Livingston 

1 957 — "AN The Way"- Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn 



SPONSOR • II! M'Kll. l'W I r ; 












Most significant tv and ratlio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



18 APRIL 1959 

0«iyrlgM I »59 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



J. Walter Thompson's media group on Shell Oil denied last week that it was 
arbitrarily setting its own rates in placing summer spot radio sehedules. 

It all started when some stations reeeived wired orders for extended packages with 
the quoted rate per minute being, as one station put it. "strictly something that must have 
been pulled out of a hat." 

From the ageney came an entirely different version. It said it was not setting its 
own rates, nor was it attempting to bargain. 

It had merely adopted a procedure of negotiating for packages in Shell's he- 
half. For instance, if the timebuying department found that the price quoted for a package 
was out of line with the actual cost-per-1.000. the buyer would point that out and leave it 
to the station to adjust the difference. 

Commented one rep: "Slice it any wav vou want to. it's an offheat way to do busi- 
ness. What if other oil companies on the same station invented their own arithmetic?" 



Campbcll-Ewald this week started lining up availabilities for GMAC's annual 
radio spot campaign, which again will use over 100 stations. 

The schedule, taking off 15 May, will provide for about 20 spots a week for 18 weeks. 
Locations are limited to the interval between Friday afternoon and Sunday evening. 



Even though minute and 20-second availabilities in key markets are not quite so 
tight as a few weeks ago. indications are that national spot tv will enjoy a far firmer 
summer than last year. 

Timebuyers this week said that while they're able to pick up daytime minutes here and 
there among the top markets, it's still tough to buy minutes in fringe nighttime. Meantime 
night I.D.s seem fairly plentiful. 

At least one sector of radio seems to be having a lucrative time of it: This con- 
sists of the stations in the New York and L. A. metropolitan areas catering to minori- 
ty audiences like Spanish Unguals and Negroes. 

One plausible explanation: Their audiences are mostly employed in services; thev have 
been less affected by employment cutbacks than skilled workers; so thev continue to be 
the special targets of such accounts as beer, foods, and drugs. 



Perhaps the largest commercials budget for any one account in tv will be the 
S800.000 that Alcoa will be spending on its plugs alone during the 1959-60 season. 

Over the course of the year it will expose 180 different commercials — never using 
the same one a second time. 

The reason: Each commercial supports a specific group of Alcoa customers and 
deals with specific uses of the fabricated product, or some new production angle of the basic 
metal. 

A large portion of the commercials wind up in spot. The agencv. F&S&R, edits 
them down to 20 seconds and ships the negatives on to fabricators for distribution 
anion? their distributors and dealers. 



• 18 April 1959 



17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 






Joe Lowe's Popsicle (Gardner) is being put into tv spot this season, with the 
coverage limited to 50 top markets. 

Initial schedule will be for four weeks. Last season the account bought participations 
in Bandstand (ABC TV). 



Ask a sharp media director to give you a clinical analysis of national radio 
spot's status and he'll likely tell you right off that it's suffering from too much attach- 
ment to past glories. (See also 11 April sponsor, page 31.) 

Further probing, as SPONSOR-SCOPE learned in taking the problem this week to some 
thoughtful mediamen, evokes such observations as these: 

• Radio spot would find it to its advantage to stop concentrating on the advertising 
leaders, because they're going to go on limiting their air dominance to tv. 

• Let the medium turn its selling force on the 1,500 or more advertisers who still 
use magazines exclusively, study their market patterns, and show them how they can be 
dominant in radio, if only in 25 to 50 markets. 

• Of course, the business from scores of these small accounts won't equal the billings from, 
say, a Lever Bros. But what is more important is this: Consider the hole that's left when a 
Lever pulls out, and the contrasting fact that in these small advertisers lies the safety 
of numbers. 

• Radio must determine to forget what it was and go out and sell itself as advertising's 
new medium: It offers uses and economies not duplicated elsewhere. 



The U.S. Census Bureau will conduct a count of tv homes the middle of May, 

and the Advertising Research Foundation will issue it in the fall. 

The last count — made in January — showed a total of 41,924,000 tv house 
holds, with 3,417,000 (or 8.2%) of them having two or more sets. Saturation: 83.2%. 



, 



Two beers — Piels and Hamm consistently have run away with first, second, 

and third places in the best-liked commercial tabulations from ARB the past 20 
months. 

Piels leads with 10 first places, nine second places, and six third places. Hamm's score 
is eight first places, nine second places, and six third places. Maypo comes next with three 
first places, four second places, and two third places. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE polled a batch of admen on the reasons beers come out so high 
in the voting, and the consensus was: (1) beers have a lot of money to spend on com- 
mercials; (2) the product's image lends itself to freedom of imagination in creating 
a mood of relaxation and fun. Hence the beer blurb can entertain as well as sell. 



Here's an oportunity for tv stations to rustle up some business for themselves. 
The Asphalt Institute is making available to paving contractors — those specializ- 
ing in home and business jobs — some cartoon commercials for use on local stations. 

The commercials, turned out through Marschalk & Pratt, come free to those contrac- 
tors interested in sponsorinj; them locally. Provision is made in the length of the films 
for the local-end announcement via slides. 

(This operation is separate from the one that the Institute does on radio in behalf of 
state highway paving contractors.) 

Postscript to last week's SPONSOR-SCOPE item about two automotives that 
gave NBC Radio schedule orders, conditional upon their winninsr the Mohilsras Economv Run. 

One order fell by the wayside. The other, from Rambler, wound up with the use 
of 94 spots over the past weekend. Average: a commercial every 15 minutes of 
Monitor. 



18 



SPONSOR 



18 april 1959 



I* 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Watch for the Iv networks to put out a lot more dollars during the next year 
in measuring the sales effectiveness of the medium. 

You'll be seeing many a study relating to individual products in Mich areas as audi- 
ence composition, sponsor identification, and use and ownership of the sponsor's 
product. 

There's a good reason for building up cases of impact on homes reached: As an answer 
when agencies or advertiser ask for justification of costs. 

The signs point to record hillings for tv next season even from the durables. 

And that's exclusive of the automotives, which seem easily headed for the SlOO-mil- 
lion-mark (see 11 April SPONSOR-SCOPE). Also the home appliances. 

Among the aluminums, both Alcoa ($5.3 million) and Kaiser ($6 million) are set, 
and Reynolds is still shopping around for a nighttime home other than Disney Presents. 

U.S. Steel has committed itself for another year. LOF will spend at least SI million, 
and Johns-Manville (JWT) is due back in tv after a prolonged absence. 

General Motors' United Motor Service and Delco Remy divisions have hroken 
with Lowell Thomas on the radio front (CBS) as well as tv. 

One probable reason: Thomas didn't extend the promotional cooperation that had 
been expected from him in connection with the travelog specials this season. 

With A.C. Sparkplugs as a third sponsor, USM and Delco will go NBC TV next 
season in eight Art Carney specials costing about S3. 5 million in time and talent. Camp- 
bell-Ewald and D. P. Brother will be the agencies. 



Lever will be spending over $500,000 in time and talent a week for nighttime 
network tv this fall. 

In terms of alternate half-hours it will be nine per week as compared with eight 

for the 1958-59 season. There's also a good possibility of still another alternate half-hour 
being added. 

Network-wise, the nine alternate half-hours (constituting seven different programs) are 
allocated six to CBS TV and three to NBC TV. 

The cost-per-l,000-homes-per-commercial-minute on nighttime network tv still 
keeps coming down, a comparison of January-February NRI's for 1959 and 1958 shows. 

These average CPMPCMs cover programing between 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. over 
seven days: 

NETWORK JAN.-FEB. 1959 JAN.-FEB. 1958 

ABC TV $2.66 S2.86 

CBS TV 2.93 2.97 

NBC TV 3.43 3.27 

3-Network Average $3.01 $3.05 

It may be far too soon to speculate on how the new tv network shows stack up 
from the viewpoint of impact, but there's one commentary by agency showmen 
worth noting: 

At the moment it looks as though a major cause for excitement will be found in 
the production quality of the oncoming adventure — or action — shows. 

The particular source of this excitement, say the admen, will be the background nv- 
sic — now scored almost exclusively live, instead of borrowed from canned libra- 
ries. Some of this scoring, they add. can be compared to the quality of the soundtracks in 
today's top-rank boxoffice pictures. 

18 april 1959 19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Not that one had anything to do with the other, hut ABC TV within the week (1) 
found its Rifleman posted as the top Nielsen show and (2) substantially raised the 
minimum requirement for nighttime. 

Effective 60 days from 1 May an advertis ;r will have to spend a minimum volume of 
$80,000 gross for an hour— it's now $60.000— and $48,000 for a nighttime half- 
hour, as compared to the present base of $36,000. 

Like the Pan-American Coffee Bureau, the Tea Council of the U.S.A. will be pin- 
pointing its iced beverage campaign this summer at the outdoor audience. 

The Tea Council's schedule will be placed in 29 markets for 13 weeks via spot radio, 
whereas the Pan-American Bureau will have an eight-week run on NBC Radio. 

The council says it has appropriated $500,000 for summer radio. Pan Ameri- 
can's initial budget is $120,000. 

The tv networks — excepting ABC TV — moved somewhat slowly in the past 
week in lining up sponsors for the fall. 

NBC TV's big one of the week was P&G's renewal of Loretta Young but in a 
new period — Wednesday, 10:30-11 p.m. 

ABC TV's contract pinups this week were Philip Marlow, Tuesday, 9:30-10 p.m., for 
Whitehall and Brown & Williamson via Bates; half of the Wednesday night Lawrence 
Welk Show for American Dairy (Campbell-Mithun) ; John Gunther's High Road for 
Ralston (Gardner); and half of the alternate week Bronco (Tuesday, 7:30-8) for Lig- 
gett & Myers (McCann-Erick9on). 

Including a couple of options (among them P&G and the Alaskans), ABC TV looks at 
least 75% sold out for the fall. 

Marschalk & Pratt, a subsidiary of McCann-Erickson, in pursuing new business 
will emphasize a plus-feature in agency services. 

The goal will be accounts in the $500,000-$ 1,000,000 brackets, and the big selling angle 
will be this: Product groups at M&P will have available gratis at the planning stage spe- 
cialists in kindred fields from McCann's other subsidiaries — Market Planning Corp., 
Sales Communications, Inc., and Communications Counselors, Inc. 

In other words, these experts in marketing, merchandising, promotion, research, sales meet- 
ings, and public relations will be handy for group heads when a client's over-all cam- 
paign is being laid out. ( Extra services of MPC, SCI. and CCI will, of course, be another 
matter.) 

An agency conjuring this week with the two-pronged question of 1) buying an 
established variety show, or 2) a minute each in three network action shows for 

about the same money, came up with this interesting statistical paradox: 

The variety show would deliver but a third of the cumulative audience of the 
three action shows, but the sponsor identification of the variety show would be propor- 
tionately twice as much as the action trio. 

The comparison in terms of weekly return worked as follows: 

SPONSORSHIP CUMULATIVE HOMES REACHED SPONSOR I.D. HOMES 

Variety show (V 2 hr.) 8,624,000 5,750,000 

3 participation minutes 25.500,000 6,758,000 

P.S.: The agency recommended the variety show to the sponsor in question. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 50; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 62; Washington Week, page 57: sponsor 
Hears, page 60; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 74; and Film-Scope, page 58. 



20 



SPONSOR 



18 april 1959 




If all stations were as fresh as this little rascal you could buy 'em blindfolded. But, they 
iren't! That's why smart buyers always ask for KPRC-TV. You see the station add its 
)Wn personality, so you know it has to be fresh — 100 S fresh. Makes sense, doesn't it? You're 
ilways sure with KPRC-TV, the low charge Houston TV station with everything — quality, 
lependability, long life . . . extra sales at no extra cost. 

5P0T AND PROGRAM AVAILABILITIES FOR ALL PRODUCTS . . . PRICES GOOD ALL OVER THE UNITED STATES 



RESENTED \ iim\ ill) in l nil ikii PETRI A CO 



SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 



19 KPRC-TV 



M HOUSTON, TEXAS 



SVCCESSFLl \DIERTISI\G STARTS WITH KPRC-TV. HO 



21 





5:.,.. 




Ml 









Television's 
most acclaimed 
sales 
personality 









• ■ * * * » • 
*>■■•■'* 



now to sell 





^ 



for you 

LOCALLY 

MISS 
FRANCES 

and 

DING 

DONG 
SCHOOL 

FIRST RUN 
BRAND-NEW 




Wire or phone today 



INDEPENDENT TELEVISION CORPORATION 

488 MADISON AVENUE • NEW YORK 22 • PLaza 5-2100 





THINGS ARE 



f POPPING 



& 



Toes tapping. Fingers snapnkw^ttt the bouncy new sound 
of WBZ, sparked by the greatest collection of deejays in 
all New England. Popular music for everybody ... a fine 
mix of current pops, great standards of all time, and tomor- 
row's hits. And there s more. Fresh, lively news coverage. 
New, tight program linenp. It's got the town buzzing - the 
ratings jumping. It's the sound of Boston's Most Popular 



Station. 




i tented by /'< ■ 11 



v* 




~Y L 10 30 

BOSTON 



W8ZA SPHINCFIE10 

Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Inc. 



49th ant 
Madison 



24 



Sweet smell of spring 
^ our article in the February 1 1th is- 
sue "Spot Radio Need- New Prestige 
With Sponsors'" struck home very 
hard here at WPEN. The recommen- 
dation you make to broadcasters urg- 
ing them to establish themselves as 
the number one community medium 
includes main items which are stand- 
ard fare here at WPEN. 

We sincerelv feel that quality is the 
answer to the future of radio. We 
know there are many among the top 
national advertisers who do consid- 
er the qualitative image, but being 
realistic we feel that the qualitative 
image is so much sound and fury 
and when the (hips are down the 
great bulk of national spot is bought 
h\ the numbers. 

We think many broadcasters who 
sincerely want to level up their oper- 
ations would do so if they know thai 
the likeb drop in ratings would not 
he followed automatically by a drop 
in national billings. 

We propose that we stop kidding 
ourselves and cither play the num- 
bers game and admit it or really hack 
up our proud claim- of beins quality 
conscious. If advertisers show con- 
crete faith in qualitative radio then 
we are certain that broadcasters will 
once again show the courage, inven- 
tiveness, and showmanship they have 
so often displayed through radio's 
historj . 

Wm. H. Caske} 

Exec. v.p., (I PEN& U PEN-FM 

Philadelphia 

Kraft commentary 

^ our "Commercial Commentary in 
the 28 March issue i- one of the 
linc-l expressions of our electronic 
philosophy thai it has ever been im 
priv ilege to read. \ml it is much ap- 
preciated, particularly in light oi the 
fad thai it come- from an unbia 
source. 

I have circulated the article to the 
key executive- of tin- company and 
i Please turn to page 2l\) 



SPONSOR • 18 VPRIL 1959 



mi 




AfSB-TV viewers 

watch as 

a deaf child 

learns to speak 



"The one hope of every parent of a deaf child is 
for the public to know and understand their handicap. 
WSR-TV gave us an answer to that hope Sunday." 
So'wrote the mother of a little student at Atlanta's 
Junior League School for Speech Correction after 
seeing WSB-TV's presentation of "A Sound Life". In an 
entertaining way this dramatic documentary showed how 
deaf children are being taught that they have voices — 
and how to use them. The film was written and 
produced by the WSB-TV staff, and shot at the school. 
Responsible, imaginative programming in the 
public interest has earned heart -warming rewards for 
WSB-TV. And for this station's advertisers also. 



Atlanta's 



WSB/TV 



Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution NBC affiliate Represented by Petry 
)nsor • 18 www. 1959 25 



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lAfllAf Acclaime( 




Frank H. Mcintosh 
26 



"A magnificent new WLW-AM transmission 
system, developed by Crosley Broadcasting 
engineers, has made WLW Radio unquestion- 
ably the World's Highest Fidelity Radio Station! 
The revolutionary new broadcasting develop- 
ment now puts WLW-AM transmission on a 
par with FM in high fidelity . . . providing a 
perfect illusion of live performance with a 
sound range from the softest pianissimo to the 
loudest crescendo." 
This distinction was confirmed in a test made 



by Frank H. Mcintosh Laboratory, Bingha 
ton, N. Y. — the world's leading indcpendt 
radio and high-fidelity transmission expert 
This highest fidelity transmission will incre; 
the WLW Radio audience even more- 
audience which for years has ranked amo 
the top 10 of over 3,200 Radio Stations 
America. 

The result of 3 years of work and !4ofaraiIlij 
dollars, it's another in Crosley's long line 
distinguished contributions to the broadcast : 



SI'ONSOH 



IK M'HII. ■ 



......II^^JI 

iv !■■■■■■ 




ILI I Aw 

■■■: IB. u 

■■■k«L ilw 



mm 
unw 



ii^m ml mm u 

lUMiiJUJ 1 



world's highest fidelity radio station 
?ith audience among top 10 in America ! 



iiustry, and provides finest commercial clarity 
fi advertisers' commercials! 
- 1 J it's another crescendo for "subscribers." 
C 7 your WL W representative . . . you'll be 
fd you did! 

Mwork Affiliations: NBC, ABC. 
I s Offices: New York, Cincinnati, Chicago, Cleveland 
S s Representatives: Tracy Moore & Associates — Los 
A|eles. San Francisco: Bomar Lowrance & Associates, 
Ii -Atlanta, Dallas 

sley Broadcasting Corporation 




world's highest fidelity station 



'ONSOR 



18 APRIL 1«).V) 



27 




£$££>' 



I8@§QJJIS§ IM 

2toI 



CAPTIVE MARKET 




National Reps. 
Weed & Co. 



49th & MADISON 

{Cont'd from page 24 1 

at the suggestion of our Marketing 
Director, we are having it reproduced 
in its entirety for distribution to our 
sales and marketing force, numbering 
in excess of 2,000. 

You are indeed correct in why we 
selected Perry Como for our forth- 
coming seasons. This acquisition was 
not easy to come by — but when all 
the smoke has cleared here, we think 
we will have attained the high quality 
entertainment which has been char- 
acteristic of Kraft's broadcasting 
since 1933. 

Again, thanks for saying what I 
believe we could not have said better. 

Robert A. Davis 

gen. advtg. mgr. 

Kraft Foods, 

Chicago 

Keep giving 'em hell 
"Build Thee More Stately Mansions'' 
(Commercial Commentary. 17 Janu- 
ary, 1959, p. 10) is one of the most 
inspiring pieces I've ever read in de- 
fence of good taste in advertising- 
good taste being no more and no less 
than simply good judgment. 

By spotlighting the pits that the 
petroleum and drug industries have 
dug for themselves — and the resulting 
criticism that all advertising reaps— 
you are performing a service of great 
consequence for this business we're in. 
1 hope you'll keep "giving 'em hell!" 

Al Fiegel 

v.p., Ackerman Assoc, Inc. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

That hound again! 

film-Scope of 28 March refers to 
Huckleberry Hound as "the only car- 
toon scries to have been fully created 
and produced expressl) for t\. 

\li-hl\ Manfred, the Wonder Do.-. 
growls thai his pal "Tom Terrific" 
was nil l\ dd'lv <>n the Captain Kan- 
garoo show when lliick was just a pup. 
Gene Deitch, creator, designer, di- 
rector and producer of 182 episodes 
of -Tom Terrific" al Terrytoons, is 
now producing commercial and en- 
tertainmenl cartoons under his own 
banner al Gene Deitch \ssoc. 

George Dryfoos 
Cene Deitch Issoc. 
Neu ) ork 

• i„ .peaking of » "aerlee." SPONSOH in- 
tended to refer ••■<!> i« half-hour program! 
presented under their own name. Therei «>( 
course, have been mam cartoons mad.- f..r ti 
an.l often presented as features »». •"■ segments 
within, other programs. 




home of great T 59's... 
set for a record '59 

Two great cars for '59, BUICR 
and CHEVROLET, mean great 
things right now for this World's 
largest General Motors plant city. 
They're made in Flint ... and 
backed-up by AC Spark Plug, 
Fisher Body, and Ternstedt . . 
all going full speed. Sell this bid 
rich market , . . and all of 
Northeast Michigan, too ... on 
W F D F. 

NBC affiliate . . . 910 on the dial 
Represented nationally by 

the KATZ AGENCY 




28 



SPONSOR • 18 M'KH. I"'' 






IN ROANOKE 

G( )N 

LOVES 

WROV 




GORDON POODS 

Dr». •« .iar s Kars Mscurts. Inc. 

P. O. Box 1 54 1 - Roanoke, Virginia 



it ■ o iriin --■ i 
ntio a « > i cite v 

J M CASWELL V Pais A T«l> 
I SCOTT BROWN V Pais 
w O GORDON V **|| 
CHARlCS ROLLtSTON V Pill 
■ S CMBRY COHPT 
CALHOUN BKCTT 




February 17, 1959 



Mr. Burt Levine 

WROV Radio 

15th & Cleveland Avenue 

Roanoke, Virginia 

Dear Burt: 

We all like to share good news... and today's good news for us 
here at Gordon Foods, which you know is a division of Sunshine Biscuits, 
Inc., is the knowledge that our Roanoke Branch has just been awarded 
the first President's Cup in the Company's history. Vie are especially 
proud of this achievement since Gordon's is one of the country's largest 
manufacturers of potato chips and snack foods and we had to compete for 
this honor with the other branches in Atlanta, Louisville, Nashville, 
Birmingham, Cincinnati, Memphis, and Norfolk. 

We sincerely believe that our radio advertising on WROV and the 
personal interest your salesman and your air personal ities ...( I should 
say " our " personalities) .. .have given us, are major contributions towards 
our winning thi s award. 

It isn't often that we can find a personality so strong in sales 
'ability and showmanship as your "Jackson" has been lor us. Your staff 
has been particularly helpful in merchandising Gordon's into your many 
popular remote broadcasts and in helping us gain valuable shelf space in 
key stores. All this adds up to increased sales, aid we are happy to 
give your station credit for it! 



It's better than 18 months since you sold us on your Sock Hop with 
Jackson, and we are pleased, indeed, to renew our participation in this 
weekly live program for another 52 weeks. We hope we can continue to 
count on your aid and personal interest to help us win the President's 
Cup the next two years, after which it becomes ours for good. We'll all 
celebrate, then! 

Cordially, 

GORDON FOODS 






t^*s&4K^ «<^ZZ 



ACR:lh 



Ashton C. Bodd 
Branch Manager 



POTATO CRIPS 



SALTID puwrrs 



ptAavr sums uanicNii ■ »— usuii hut riats . cams - cooucs 

I'll > IHW ■ CI— ST> POTATO STICKS ■ 11111 Ml RESCKAAUWSI 






Use these WROV personalities and 
ROANOKE will love you! 

KEN TANNER • 
JERRY JOYNES 



BARBARA FELTON 
• JIVIN' JACKSON 



WROV 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

Hurt Levine, President 
Represented by J tick .]},/.</</ & Co., hu 



PONSOR 



18 APRIL !«).!<) 



29 




Now Everyone Knows! 



X'or nearly 10 years the folks in WCCO 
Television's 68-county coverage area have 
known first-hand the outstanding news- 
casts presented 57 times each week hy the 
Northwest's most popular television stal ion. 

Now, everybody knows of WCCO Tele- 
vision's top news coverage. For WCCO 
Television has been named "Newsfilm Sta- 
tion of the Year" in the world's largest com- 
petition for photo-journalism — sponsored 
jointly by the National Press Photograph- 
ers' Association, Encyclopedia Britannica, 
and the University of Missouri. 

This beautiful plaque will be placed proud- 
ly next to the award WCCO Television 
received in 1955 as the "Outstanding Tele- 
vision News Operation of the United States 
and Canada" from the National Association 



of Radio and Television News Directors. 

There's another award we treasure, too. 
It's the one WCCO Television wins from the 
734,800 Minnesota-Wisconsin viewing fami- 
lies every month. ARB, for example, has 
reported WCCO Television with the lion's 
share of sets-in-use, sign-on to sign-off every 
day, for 41 of the past 45 months. 

It is for honors such as these that WCCO 
Television is known throughout the North- 
west as the champion station for viewing, 
and the champion station for selling. And 
now, everybody knows. 



Newsfilm Station of the Year 



WCCO Television 

CHANNEL 

MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 
Represented by Peters, Griffin, Woodward , Inc 







:;i. 



si'ovsoi; 



18 M'HII. 10' 



SPONSOR 



18 APRIL 1959 




IR SENIOR MANAGEMENT includes (I to r) John C. Maddox, senior v. p., corporate services (research, merchandising and p.r.); Arthur E. 
tram, senior v. p., tv/radio; John C. Williams, senior v. p., development; Robert E. Allen, president; and Charles M. Skade, senior v. p., adminis- 
Itive. The agency ranks 2lst in siie, has nearly 500 employees, about I85 of whom own the stock. Average age of exec staff is 43 



A "blue chip" agency with many non-impulse products could find tv a problem 
Instead, Fuller & Smith & Ross invented a formula, bills S10 million in air 



leu advertising agencies sit down to play what 



PV hen advertising agencies sit (low 
BC TV's Ollie Treyz calls "the t\ game.'* it would 
• hard to find a player with a more sure-fire sys- 
l|m than Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc. FSK may go 
the table with -mailer -takes than some (about 
-' I oi its $44 million annual hilling- goes to tv 
id radio), hut it come- away a consistent winner. 
lie kev to the FSR "system" lies in a dynamic 



'ONSOR 



18 APRIL 19o9 



approach coupled with a belief that both t\ and 
radio have a lot more to offer than circulation. 

Here are the element- of an FSR tv campaign, 
in order of their importance: 

1. The commercial. It mu-t motivate. 

2. Program's influence on the viewing of the 
commercial. 

3. Merchandiseabilirj of the total plan com- 



31 



mercial and program combined. Does 
it excite the local dealer? 

4. Keeping program and talent 
costs under control. 

5. Program popularity. Given 
proper facilities support, is the show 
getting the required audiences? 

6. Cost-per-1,000. 

7. Research — on everything. 
That cost-per-1,000 falls into sixth 

position while merchandiseability is 
high on the list is indicative of the 
imagination that has marked FSR's 
air media strategy. Founded in 1907 
by Harry Dwight Smith, known for 
27 years as Fuller & Smith (there 
hasn't been a Smith, Fuller or Ross 
around for two decades), the agency 
could, by the advent of tv, have found 
some excuse to lapse into static senil- 
ity. Its long-established image was 
"heavy," both by the nature of its 
accounts (no soaps, foods, tobaccos) 
and its media use; for 16 years, it has 
ranked first, second or third in busi- 
ness publication advertising. Adding 
to the ponderous atmosphere was the 
tremendous solidity of the firm; FSR 
is one of only 17 agencies in the U.S. 
rated AAA1 by Dun & Bradstreet. 
Its total assets are in excess of $4 
million. FSR has been, as are many 



ol its accounts (Alcoa, Hercules Pow- 
der, Libbey -Owens-Ford. Westing- 
house, C.I.T., Sherwin-Williams, etc. I 
a "blue chip' — an enviable position, 
to be sure, but one that suggests 
something closer to institutional bank- 
ing than to show business. It is 
doubtful that many in the advertising 
industry along about 1950 would 
have bet that FSR or its non-impulse 
product clients would one day be- 
come a force in tv and radio. 

"Tv was forced upon us," sa>s Ar- 
thur E. Duram, senior vice president 
in charge of radio and tv. "We had 
to give your clients the benefit of this 
new medium, but we also knew we 
had to tailor our use of the medium 
to meet our clients' rather special 
needs." Since many of the clients 
never come into direct contact with 
their ultimate consumers, but rather 
supplies their products to manufac- 
turers of finished goods, the needs 
were indeed special. 

FSR set out to lick the problem. 
They licked it by a blending of show- 
manship with merchandising. They 
licked it by the acquisition of young, 
creative personnel (average age of 
executive staff is 43) reflected in the 
coming of Robert Allen as president 



in 1955. They licked it with a d)i 
namic approach that makes every ai 
media campaign a complete marke 
ing package. 

In the last six years, FSR has ori| 
inated major net t\ campaigns for tl 
following nationals: Alcoa, Libbe' 
Owens-Ford. Sherwin-Williams Pair 
Westinghouse, Owens Corning Fibe 
glas, Commercial Solvents Corp.. Ed 
son Electric Institute, America 
Greeting Cards, Bolex Cameras, Weai 
Ever utensils, Sterling Silversmit! 
Guild, Waring Blendors. For the fo 
lowing accounts, it has handled nt 
radio or regional spot radio/tv can 
paigns: Lhiiversal C.I.T.. Pan-Amer 
can Coffee Bureau. Sterling Silvei 
smiths. Gulistan Carpets. Ruberoic 
Hercules Powder, Detroit Steel Proc 
ucts (Fenestra). 

"Its all very well to create cor 
sumer desire," says Duram, "but yo 
must also get the local dealer on you 
team." How FSR accomplishes thi 
is demonstrated by the chart showin 
what was done on an Alcoa campaig 
for motor boats. 

It has paid off handsomely for th 
agency. In 1950. its billings wer 
$25.4 million: last year they wer 
(Please turn to page 46) 



TYPICAL FSR PACKAGE OF "DYNAMICS" FOR ALCOA 



:ii!l!K 



October 15th Direct mail to dealers and customers (by Alcoa and NBC) 

November 19th Closed circuit sales meeting (by Alcoa and NBC) 

Trade advertisements appear. More direct mail. 
November /■ 

Calls on dealers by NBC personnel 
December J 

January 12-16 __ Promotional spots on NBC Radio network — 3 or 4 a day 

January 16 .._ 50-minute spectacular from Yew York Boat Show 

January 17 // lite-minute vignettes (commercials and dealer tie-ins) 

January 18 JO five-minute vignettes (commercials and dealer tie-ins | 

February 2-6 Promotional spots [Chicago Boat Show) on NBC Radio net 

February 7 / / fire-minute vignettes {commercials and dealer tie-ins) 

February 8 / / five-minute vignettes (commercials and dealer tie-ins) 

In Spring Tv commercial on Alcoa Theatre 



lllllll!!l!lllllll!llllll!llll!l!lllllll!!!![[[|||||llllllllll!! 



Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll !!lllilllll!lllll!!!ll!!llll!!lll Illlll!l!l!lllllllil« 



32 



SPONSOR 



18 kvhu. 195 



Illl Il'l 



niiiiiiiiini 






NEXT FALL'S NETWORK TV SHOWS: NEW AND OLD 



NO. OF NEW SHOWS 
NEXT FALL 



NO. OF CURRENT SHOWS 
NEXT FALL 



SHOW TYPE 


•59'60 
Total 


ABC 


CBS 


NBC 


ABC 


CBS 


NBC 


WESTERN 


23 


1 


1 


4 


7 


6 


1 


SIT. COMEDO 


120 


2 


1 


3 


5 


4 


2 


MYSTERY 


1 1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


4 


1 


DRAMA 


13 


1 


2 


1 


1 


(> 


2 


MUSIC-VAR. 


12 


1 




1 


4 


1 


3 


VDYENIl RE 


1 1 


4 


3 


2 


1 


1 




PANEL 


10 








1 


3 


4 


SPORTS 


5 


2 




1 


1 




1 


COMED1 


2 








2 


DOCUMENTARY 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


NOT SET 


2 






2 





Tv nets launch big show shakeup 



^ A third of next season's shows will he new, with 
its scrambling for nighttime audience domination 

* There's a big gain in 60-minnte lengths, mystery- 
Hveiiture themes, phis new stress on show quality 



Ihe biggest program shakeup in 
e.ork tv history is taking place 
i spring in preparation for a full 
•on which will see the three nets 
••ling it out in a simile arena: the 
kk itself. 

ow that ABC has lined up sta- 
te and audience for a more even 
i; li with its opponents. CBS and 
■I". all three networks are rustling 
innd in an effort to nail down pro- 
lans and nighttime blocks. 

he\ re developing new formats 
n innovations on old ones: elimi- 
•hg non-productive shows and ex- 
iling 30-minute successes to an 



hour: cross-cutting and switching 
this season's favorite shows to other 
times and nights to bolster antici- 
pated audiences. 

\ll in all. network programers are 
whipping up enthusiasm and stock- 
piling ammunition for what ob- 
servers expect to be a knock-down- 
drag-out fight for nighttime domi- 
nance. 

More than a third of all the shows 
on the air this fall will he new ones. 
Main will be new in concept. Some 
will take an old concept and freshen 
it up with new angles and ap- 
proaches. But the newest element — 



sSOR 



18 april 1959 



now that tin' battle involves lime 
more evenl) matched opponents is 
an intense concentration on quality 
— qualih in plot, writing, easting 
and production. The new shows are 
adding what network people call 
subtlety or sophistication or depth. 
si*o\sok surve\ecl the networks 
this past fortnight to determine the 
exact day-by-daj rundown on shows 
for next fall. Surprisingly, most of 
the nights and hours are solidly 
locked up though there will of course 
he many revisions before the fall 
starting dates. Here are some of the 
highlight findings t full details appear 
in charts on next two panes) . 

• Of 11 5 pi ograms now on the 
hooks i some tentative, some firm), 
13 will be aired for the first time. 
The total show breakdown: \B< . 17; 
CBS. 12: NBC, 34 

• There's a marked trend back to 
the hour-long program, with some 
current half-hour versions being ex- 



33 





HERE'S WHAT THE NETWORKS WILL OFFER NEXT FALL. 

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY 


7:00 


You 
Asked 
For It 


Lassie 


Trace 
Hunter 
















7:30 


Maverick 


Wonderful 

World of 

Little 

Julius 


I 


Cheyenne 


Name 
That 
Tune 


Bat 

Masterson 

or 

Mystery 

Adventure 


Open 


Destination 
Space 


River 
Boat 


Confe: 

W 


8:00 


i 


Ed 
Sullivan 


Edge 
of the 
Jungle 


I 


The 
Texan 


1 


Sugarfoot 


i 


i 


Ga 

Sto 


8:30 


Law Man 


i 


i 


Bourbon 

Street 

Beat 


Father 

Knows 

Best 


Wells 
Fargo 


Wyatt 
Earp 


Many 
Loves 

of 
Dobie 

Gillis 


Wichita 
Town 


Har 


9:00 


Colt .45 


G. E. 
Theatre 


Dinah 
Shore 


i 


Danny 
Thomas 


Peter 
Gunn 


The 

Rifleman 


Peck's 
Bad 
Girl 


Arthur 

Murray 

Party 


Diarr, 
He 


9:30 


The 

Alaskans 


Alfred 

Hitchcock 

Presents 


1 


Adventure 

in 

Paradise 


Ann 
Sothern 


Aico a 

Theatre 

& 

Goodyear 

Anthology 

(alt. weeks) 


Action- 
Adventure 


Red 
Skelton 


Ford 
Hour 


J 


10:00 


i 


Jack Benny 

& George 

Gobel 

(alt. weeks) 


Loretta 
Young 


i 


Hennessey 


Steve 
Allen 


Alcoa 

Presents 


Garry 
Moore 


1 


Fig 


10:30 


Meet 
McGraw 


What's My 
Line? 


N 




June 
Allyson 


t 




A 


N 




N — No network programing. 

Source: SPONSOR surrey of networks. 




paneled to 00 minutes and others six, mystery-detective, eight, and ad- both horizontally and vertically. On 
scrapped entirely for a new and venture, nine. All told, there'll be 23 notable pattern: to program entire! 
longer replacement. There'll be 30 Westerns on the schedules, 20 situa- different program types opposite eac 
shows next season one hour or longer tion comedies and 1 1 adventure other in an effort to reach broad ai 
and of these 15 are new — seven on series. dienees with different tastes (Sui 
\I!C, two on CBS and six on NBC • Westerns are being balanced day, 8:30 p.m. — ABC. Law Man 
1 there are seven at CBS now on the with "easterns," or with what might CBS, Ed Sullivan; NBC, Edge of th 
air, four each at the other nets) . be termed more sophisticated story Jungle). 

• Biggest gains by program type lines concerned with the psyche in • Chink-filling early in the se 
indicate continuing popularity for contrast with the saddle. son lea\es few open time periods. 1 
situation comedies, with nine new • There seems to be a heller pro- pros time, ABC has two half-horn 
programs of this format; Westerns, Lrani spread anions the networks unfilled: CBS. one one-hour perioi 

34 SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 195 



. 


THE 43 NEW SHOWS ARE SHOWN 

pESDAY THURSDAY 


IN WHITE BLOCKS. 
FRIDAY SATURDAY 




















Jubilee 
U.S.A. 








eup 


Wagon 
Train 


Situation 
Comedy 


To Tell 
The Truth 


Laramie 


Walt Disney 
Presents 


Rawhide 


Panel Show 

or 
Space Show 


Dick 
Clark 


Perry 
Mason 


Bonama 




, 


; 


Donna 
Reed 


December 
Bride 


i 


i 
ii 


i 


People 
Are Funny 


High 
Road 


1 


I 






down 


The Price 
Is Right 


The Real 
McCoys 


Derringer 


Love 

and 

Marriage 


Tombstone 
Territory 


Dennis 
The Menace 


Fibber 
McGee 
& Molly 


Leave 
It To 
Beaver 


Wanted: 

Dead 
Or Alive 


Johnny 
Staccato 




ne 
bnaire 


Perry 
Como 


Pat 
Boone 


Zane Grey 
Theatre 


Bachelor 
Father 


77 Sunset 
Strip 


Desilu 
Playhouse 


Open 


Lawrence 
Welk 


Blue 
Men 


Barbara 
Stanwyck 




Got 

ecret 


i 


World 

of 
Talent 


Playhouse 90 
& Biography 
(alt. weeks) 


Ernie 
Ford 


i 


i 


Black 
Cat 


A 


Have Gun; 
Will Travel 


Jeopardy 


1 

T 
t 


Steel 
& 

xle 
atre 
weeks) 


This Is 
Your Life 


The 
Fat Man 


i 


You Bet 

Your Life 


Robert 

Taylor's 

Detectives 


Twilight 
Zone 


Cavalcade 

of Sports 

and Jackpot 

Bowling 


Major 
Sports 
Events 


Gunsmoke 


i 




L 




1 


i 


Open 




Person 

to 
Person 




i 


Markham 


Lawless 
Years 



NBC, a lone hour slot and three half- 
hour segments. 

\l>(. TV's vice president for pro- 
graming and talent. Thomas Moore, 
comments happily on his network's 
kate of "being locked up." 

"W ere in fine shape. Now we 
know exact!) where were going." 
He figures he's "going" toward higger 
and hetter audiences and the kind of 
ratings which will put the network 
in solid No. 2 spot. He's particularly 



enthusiastic about the new popularity 
ol the hour-long format because ''this 
gives us more time to develop char- 
acter and plots and makes for a better 
inclement ol entertainment." 

His NBC TV counterpart agrees. 
Allan D. Courtney, vice president in 
charge of nighttime programs, sees 
the longer time span as an opportu- 
nity for t\ programers to compete 
with the best motion pictures as \\ «l 1 
as with other nets t\ offerings. 



"\\ ere working for a totality of 
programing." says Mr. Courtnt \ . 
"and we're developing longer shows 
as well as better ones to reach all 
areas of public interest. With more 
time, we can have a better quality 
production and more sophisticated or 
complicated plots which get down to 
what people are really thinking and 
feeling about." 

From this thinking emerges plot 
i /'lease turn to page 54) 



SPONSOR 



18 April 1959 



35 



SCREEN GEMS' SECRET WEAPON: ( 

^ 10-year rise of tv film company can he traced to Ralph Colin's unique organization 




BRAINS TRUST in plans talks with president Ralph Cohn includes v.p.'s John Mitchell (left), Jerome Hyams (rear) and Burton Hanft (right) 



I en years ago this week a 50-page 
report on a new industry was pre- 
sented by a son to his father. The 
philosophy behind the report, the new 
industry, and the family tie subse- 
quently have produced a giant op- 
eration in virtually every facet of that 
industry. 

The family was one of old-line 
names in the entertai n m»iil business: 
brothers Jack and Harry Cohn, co- 
founders of Columbia Pictures, and 
reporl-w i iti'i Ralph M. Cohn (Jack's 
son i . then in his early thirties. I he 
new industry was tv, which at thai 
time had nol even acomplished its 



fust coast-to-coast network, and which 
was nothing more than an annoying 
question mark to many in the motion 
picture business. The philosophy 
that Ralph Cohn advocated was to 
put Columbia Pictures into television 
on the ground floor. Thus Screen 
(Jems was created in April 19 19 with 
the young enthusiast as general man- 
ager. 

Hut Cohn didn't pla\ it wildly. 
\\ hile he wanted to gel into produc- 
tion and distribution for t\ as soon 
as possible, he didn't see the sense 
of risking any major move until the 
market was ready to support it. Con- 



sequently, Screen Gems entered the 
commercials production field, and 
from 1949 to 1951 made 200 com- 
mercials — but nothing else. The new 
television company was gaining ex- 
perience in video's special require- 
ment which would be useful when 
the right time arrived. The blueprint 
was alread\ etched to give Columbia 
Pictures a tv wedge into as many 
areas as possible in film making and 
selling. 

The lack of just such a plan was to 
force other motion picture companies 
to get into tv later out of sheer neces- 
sit\ rather than choice The Columbia 



36 



SPONSOR 



18 april 1959 



ORGANIZATION 



ptterns, say most industry observers 





SIMULTANEOUS sales operations in two areas have Robert Seidelman 
(above, left) working out syndication tactics with Jerome Hyams 
and Norman Gluck while John Mitchell (below, center) maps fall 
network strategy with account men Carroll Bagley and George Hankoff 



SALES PROMOTION session of syndicated Sfakeouf (above) 
brings together Pierre Marquis, Irv Klein and eastern sales- 
man Ben Colman. Below, a new film episode gets final cuts 





NEW PROGRAMS for fall include The Secret Life of James Thurber, 
previewed (below) by humorist Thurber, center, and his wife, right 



Pictures-Screen Gem's continuit) was 
to be virtually the only exception to 

one of the most drastic business 
blunders of the centurv: the mass 
failure of Hollywood to grasp at the 
right time the implications of tv in 
film entertainment. 

Slowl) and steadil) the Screen 
Gems blueprint became realih . B\ 
1952. network production began with 
dramatic film programs such as Ford 
Theater. Screen Gems has remained 
a leading supplier, producing and 
selling its own network film fart 
ever since. In 1954. Screen Gems 
jumped into international tv film 



INSOB 



18 APRIL 195»J 




sales, capitalizing on the additional 
revenue potential of its film product 
abroad. Today, it is one of the two 
top factors in overseas film sales. 
Tu<> years later, 1956, Screen Gems 
acquired Hygo-Unity, a distributor 
of feature films, and made the back- 
log of Columbia. I niversal, and other 
studios available to stations. The 
Screen Gems catalog of feature films 
currently consists of more than 900 
pictures, probably the largest of any 
of the distributors. 

Last year, Screen Gems went into 
a fourth major area of tv film activ- 
ity by producing programs for syn- 
dication. A separate staff to create 
and produce shows for this purpose 
was set up; it is expected to be fully 
operational by the 1950-60 season. 
This February, phase No. 5 of the 
blueprint unfolded with the acquisi- 
tion of Elliot. Unger & Elliott, the 
high-fashion East Coast commercials 
producer. 

Right now Screen Gems is ready- 
ing itself for the growth of video 
tape as Project No. 6. One of the 
motives behind the merger with El- 
liot, Unger & Elliot was to invest in 
a going company with an established 
reputation for "live" style photo- 
graphy and with existing tape facil- 
ities. In short, its another case of get- 



ting in on the ground floor. Concur- 
rent!) a seventh phase of Screen Gems 
operations has begun — acquisition 
of stations themselves. 

In all. at the end of its first decade 
(the 10th birthday celebration is 
going on this week I Screen Gems 
had assembled an organization totally 
unlike anything else in television. It 
has a horizontal line that covers every 
possible aspect of recorded — enter- 
tainment. 1 1 he station ownership 
plans appears to be a diversification 
and profit-making move rather than 
an attempt to build an all-vertical 
empire. I In 10 years, Screen Gems 
has accomplished this: an active or- 
ganization in five important areas of 
tv film — plus leadership in at least 
four of those five areas. 

In terms of its successes, what is 
the lesson of Screen Gems for any 
business operation in tv? 

Ralph Cohns viewpoint is simply 
this: In order to assume continuing 
profits, you have to apply knowledge 
of past successes to an increasinglv 
changing and unpredictable future. 
"Screen Gems is like a centipede.'" 
he says. "We know that sooner or 
later some of its legs might be shot 
off. Therefore, we must be sure there 
always will be some healthy legs to 
stand on." 




MAJOR CONFERENCE of 16 Screen Gems executives hear fall plans outlined by Ralph Cohn. 
At left, John Mitchell, Bill Fineshriber, Norman Gluck, Peter Keane, and Milton Klein. Rear, 
Gene Plotnik, Steve Kranz, Burton Hanft and Benedict Berenberg. Right, Bcrton Schneider, 
Jerome Hyams, Edward Justin, Henry White, Daniel Glass, Pierre Marquis, Bob Seidelman 



Meantime to some competitors th 
guiding principle of Columbia Pic 
tures-Screen Gems organization ofte: 
is hastily passed off as nothing mor 
than the power of the Cohn dvnastv 
But that's hardly the whole stor 
While the Cohn family did transm 
its know-how in production and sal*: 
from motion pictures to tv film, on. 
a philosophy of diversification an 
preparedness can really account f<. 
the spectacular growth. How di 
Screen Gems turn this trick when th 
others couldn't? 

Getting competent outside execi 
tives is one major answer. Thus i 
1956, Jerome Hyams and Robei 
Seidelman of Hygo-Unity came int 
the Screen Gems organization whe 
that company was absorbed. In 195' 
William Eineshriber left an NB' 
v.p. post to direct Screen Gems' ii 
ternational operations. Last yea; 
Harry Ackerman, formerly CBS v.] 
of West Coast production, becam 
Screen Gems' v.p. in charge of pr< 
duction. In 1959, Stephen Ellio 
president of Elliot. Unger & Elliot, le 
that company as a quasi-autonomou 
unit into the Screen Gems fold, fi 
the same time such Universal Picture 
executives as Norman Gluck and A 
fred Mendelsohn were brought ii 
The secret of Columbia Picture; 
Screen Gems strength over the vear 
is this: a backbone of the Coh 
family at the top, with independentl 
strong and experienced executives i 
key posts. 

The Screen Gems formula for I 
film success has avoided all the pi 
falls that one or another competitt 
has had to face. Among them: ii 
sufficient financing: premature inves 
ment : and the dangers of calcificatio 
at the top or the lack of a guidii 
principle in everday operations. Ii 
stead, Screen Gems knows it can mal 
what it has sold. Second, when nece 
sar) a network sale can be made f< 
little more than costs — or even belo 
costs, in certain cases — because the 
are the additional revenue potentia 
of international sales and syndi 
tion re-runs. Third. Screen Gems h. 
not committed itself to making at 
selling program* through a single nt 
work. Fourth. Screen Gems aims 
pi o\ iding a "one-stop sen ice" for a 
vertisers, which — by r eliminating mi 
dlemen — promises more quality I 
a fixed price, or cost-efficiencj , 
(Please turn to page 17) 



38 



SPONSOR 



18 APRIL I" 





^■■flflL 



HUMAN APPROACH to selling banking services is here illustrated by Wm. A. Kielmann, president of Central Bank & Trust Co., L. I., N. Y. 



WHAT RADIO DID FOR A BANK 



* Long Island chain finds steady use of radio can mer- 
chandise loans and deposits, get traffic for new outlets 



^5. inks in droves have been flocking 
to the air media recently, producing 
a type ol local and spot revenue un- 
dreamed of a few years ago. One 
such satisfied user appears in the 
picture above complete with shirt- 
sleeves, radio microphone and script. 
W hat makes \\ illiam \. Kielmann. 
the 60-year-old presidenl of the Cen- 
tral Hank \ Trust Co. of Long Island, 
\. , 4 .. a fine example of today's 
trends is the evolution of his insti- 
tution and his own thinking vis-a-vis 
radio. Specificall) : 

• Central Bank & Trust has heen 
adding branches rapidl) (today's 
business costs and opportunities make 
volume as important to a hank as to 
a department store). 

• Volume quite naturally hinges 



on getting more dcpo-it> and making 
more loans. 

• To get both, a hank has to go 
out and sell itself like an\ business. 

• Radio has proved an effective 
medium — in terms ol cost, actual re- 
sults, and creating a favorable im- 
pression of the institution. 

I. ,i~t year Central Bank \ Trust 
-pent $9,555 (or about a quarter of 
its budget i with WHLI, Hempstead, 
L. I., its fourth successive budget 
boost for that radio station. In fact. 
Kielmann"- association with Will. I 
dates back a dozen years long be- 
fore Central Hank ^ Trust was even 
in existence. 

In l'HT Kielmann was head of 
People's National in Lynbrook. I.. I.. 
looking For a waj to take advantage 



of the commercial and population 
growth ol Nassau and Suffolk coun- 
ties. A musical program at 12:1") 
p.m. was picked to plug the institu- 
tion. 

"Clearly, people and their emo- 
tional reactions toward banking 
would be part ol the growth of com- 
mercial banking in the area."' Kit-I- 
mann says. "A bank cant afford to 
inereb If iliac as a coincidence." 

Kielmann knew it would be an 
uphill battle to convince industrial, 
business, even \ illage and school 
officials, that his bank deserved their 
confidence and trust. "We had to 
dramatize our sen ices," he -a\ -. "\\ . 
had to create an atmosphere for 
OU] -' l\ >■-." 

So he inaugurated The People's 
Houi of Music on W Ml. I and tested 
the copj appeals i onvenience, inter- 
est rates, package loan- 1 that would 
appeal to people moving into the 
growing area. 



SPONSOR 



18 April 1959 



39 



In 1954, Kielmann and a group 
of associates obtained a national hank 
charter and opened the National Bank 
of Great Neck (now Central Bank \ 
Trust Co.) The People's Hour of 
Music — title intact — went with him. 
Without missing a single broadcast, 
the commercials switched from their 
former '"established institution" feel 
to the "up and coming" appeals be- 
fitting a bank just starting out. 

Here are the copy appeals he has 
tested, the departures from the 
straight program schedule he has 
used and the methods he has devised 
to gauge effectiveness of broadcast : 

• Loans. 20% of the copy balance 
goes to this point (outweighed only 
by a 3'< emphasis on new deposi- 
tors). Kielmann emphasizes package 
loans primarily. The human ap- 
proach is illustrated in the copy: 
"It's Spring Fever all right. A rash 
of tax bills, the urge to get to work 
on repairs to the lawn, the house, the 
office. The best remedy for this kind 
of spring fever is a single loan from 
Central Bank & Trust . . ." 

• Deposits. A 30% copy emphasis 
on deposits covers all types — savings, 
regular and special checking. Again, 
a bit of psychology in the copy: 
"Give yourself the convenience and 
prestige of a special checking ac- 
count . . ." Interest rates on savings 
accounts, an important aspect of 
banking today, is dramatized, too. 
(Kielmann offers 3% compounded 



quarterly, a major copy point for 

deposits. I 

• Facilities. 20% emphasis here, 
covering an "auto teller" at the main 
bank with a turn table device which 
turns the car around and sends it out 
in the same direction it came in: a 
3 to 5 p.m. window for deposits onl\ : 
other convenience factors. 

• Services. 10% emphasis here, 
covering safe deposit boxes, Christ- 
mas clubs (pitched heavily at first of 
\ car) . 

• Institutional. 20% of the copy 
is in this category, generally building 
up the banking business. Included 
here is a schedule of three special 
half-hour broadcasts each year — at 
New Year's. Fourth of July, and 
Thanksgiving. It consists of a sum- 
mation of the year's events with 
historical anecdotes. There is no 
commercial in the usual sense, but 
Kielmann delivers a 90-second insti- 
tutional pitch. 

• New branches. Four new 
branches have been opened in the 
past three years, two of them last 
year. A month-long spot announce- 
ment schedule precedes the Saturday 
opening, capped by a remote from the 
bank at 12 o'clock of the big day. 
The pre-opening spot schedule con- 
sists of two to three 60-second an- 
nouncements per day, pointing up 
greater convenience and telling an 
expansion story. 

{Please turn to page 54) 



pillll!llll!l!!lilllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllll 

HOW CENTRAL'S VOLUME AND 
RADIO APPROPRIATION GREW 

DEPOSITS & ADVERTISING RADIO 

YEAR RE70URCES BUDCET BUDGET BRANCHES 

Jm. $ 1.000,000 
1954 Doc. $11,131,000 $21,235 $5,218 Great Neclc (main) 



1955 Doc. $13 015,000 $24,750 



85.313 



1916 Dec. 816.151.000 $26,335 



5,553 New Hyde P^rk 



1957 Doc. $23,321,000 $36,086 $7,925 East Hills (Roslyn) 



1958 Dec. $51,657,000 $41,368 



lllllllllliii 



',555 Lynbroolc & 

Port Washington 



40 




DR. LEON ARONS, v. p. of research for 
TvB who aslted to answer the Post's claims 



^ Research v. p. points out 
weaknesses and fallacies in 
Saturday Evening Post ad 
in last week's SPONSOR 

by Leon Arons, Ph.D. 

^^EP has come up with a "new"' 
concept of audience measurement 
which it applies blithely i in a recent 
insert in sponsor I to intermedia com- 
parisons — to the accompaniment of 
drawings of apples and oranges, and 
the sage comment, "applesauce." The 
new concept of measurement is called 
ad page exposure. Ad page exposure, 
says the insert, "goes smack to the 
core of your advertising effective- 
ness!" Moreover, as a measure, it is 
equivalent to cost-per-1.000 per min- 
ute-commercial on the average night- 
lime television program, they say. 
Let's first take a look at the cost- 
per-1,000 what. \d page exposure is 
a further step in the direction appar- 
ently set up earlier for Reader's 
Digest, in which the measure "issue 
reading days" was developed to indi- 
cate the frequencj with which people 
are exposed to an issue I days). The 
technique was an ingenious one and 
did provide an indication of the 
"^hclf life" of different publications. 
For example, it became evident from 
these results that the Sunday supple- 
ment was different from the regular 
magazines in that the average for a 
supplement was about one reading 
day, but was somewhat higher for 
weeklies, and still higher for monthly 
magazines. Obviously, if it is fre- 
quencj of referring to the same issue 
of a publication, one can multiply bj 
the number of readers. 

The next Step was SEP's ad "ex- 



SI'OVSOH 



I!! APRIL 19S<> 



TvB HITS POST AD IN SPONSOR 



posure days. I he stated premise for 
this concept was an interesting one. 
A new kind of "exposure" conies into 
being, a special kind of exposure 
which is lidiK defined. It isn't actual 
exposure the setting up of communi- 
cations contact with the reader, ii is 
how man) people could be exposed, 
measured I>\ page turning. The justi- 
fication advanced is that perception 
of advertising is the advertiser's re- 
sponsibilit) (not the medium's) "be- 
cause it depends on qualities of tin 1 
ad which the medium does not con- 
trol. " This, of course, is something 
less than accurate. \ll pages ob\ i- 
ousl) do not share equall) in reader 
trallic. Moreover, a medium is con- 
uderabl) more than its physical defi- 
nition. \ recent T\ \\ stud\ on the 
dynamics of mass media shows that 
individual media have characteristic 
patterns in the values which people 
take from them and in the wa\ in 
which people experience the media. 
Moreover, people tend to take the 
same personal values from advertis- 
ing as from the medium which carries 
the advertising. The media are any- 
thing but neutral carriers. Each 
medium comes to the consumer with 
a character of its own which helps to 
determine the maimer in which the 
consumer relates himself to the adver- 
tising, etc. It does not seem sensible 
that SKI' would use the premise for 
its measure that the medium contrib- 
utes nothing hut physical space (or 
time i . 

But lets get back to ad exposure 
days and page turning. This new 
kind of exposure, the report on the 
research states, is independent of the 
characteristics of the ad or the ads 
on the page. It pursues the logic of 
its position by showing tabulations 
which demonstrate there are no dif- 
ferences in SEP's "exposure" be- 
tween a color page, a black-and-white 
page, a spread, a single page or a 
part-page. One might observe paren- 
thetically that this could be a prob- 
lem to the space salesman. As a mat- 
ter of interest. SEP's insert might 
just as well have used a five-line ad 
for cost of advertising for computing 
the cost-per-1.000 ad exposures, since 
the number of ad page exposures is 



IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIII 









8-PAGE INSERT. FOR THE SEP 
MADE BIG 'EXPOSURE' CLAIMS 



To t<-ll ii^ story on "advertising ex- 
posures" in important miiiiiiiiil ml- 
vertisers, the Saturda) Evening Post 

tool, an 8-page, four-coloi in^rrl in 

iln- 1 1 April issue oj sponsor. Pro- 
tests against the magazine's claim 
thai "page turnings" could be com- 
pared Id one-minute net it commer- 
cials mi a cost basis, came immedi- 
ately from many tv men. Despite 
tlw Post's insistence, nea/l\ all 

sound research men agree you Can I 

compare such "apples uml oranges. 



I!li;il!llll|lllllllll!!!lllllllllllll!lllllll!llllllllllllllllli 




Ad Page Exposure 

advert ■ 

.iudy It' Ti will 



the same, with the outcome ol 1' per 
1. 1 mi) instead of the 90* listed. 

There are other interesting obser- 
vations in the stud) report. For ex- 
ample, alter the respondent has iden- 
tified each page he remembers ha\in- 
opened i ". . . regardless of whether 
or not you remember seeing anything 
on the page. I want \ ou to try as best 
as 5 ou can to identify every page that 
was ful 1 \ opened, even if only for a 
split second. The oiil\ pages I don't 
want are those you onlv opened part- 
wax just to look at the page number 
in the corner."), he is questioned 
about each page he has not desig- 
nated as being seen: '"As often hap- 
pens some of the pages which you 
-kipped might have been opened if 
onlj for a split second while you 
were leafing b\ them or looking for 
the next page you wanted. I know it'- 
hard to be sure about which pages 
were opened, particularly when you 
turn pages rapidly, but how about 
these pages — do you think they even 
might have been opened for onlj a 
split second?" One can picture the 
interviewer's "might have'" being an- 
swered with a "maybe." \nd by the 
rules of the game, if one page was 
designated as being opened, b) infer- 
ence the adjoining page also got cred- 



SPONSOR 



18 April 1959 



it. It i- intei est ing that in one ol the 
preliminarj tests in which observers 
recorded the page openings through 
the use of a one-way mirror, the re- 
port states that it was not possible to 
record ever) page opened due to the 
rapid turning of pages b\ -nine wad- 
er-. 

The extensive amount of page turn- 
ing in magazine reading comes as no 
surprise in the light of our study of 
media dynamics. People tend to ap- 
proach magazines in a casual manner 
and the reader'- "attitude more often 
can be described as a casual, fre- 
quently brow -in- one of turning 
page- and looking at whatever cap- 
tures his interest." 

\\ e are now somewhat closer to the 
answer of "co-t-per-1 .IMMI what.'" \p- 

parently it is cost-per-1,000 page 

turnings. I>\ tin- time we have neat- 
U Lost both the consumer and the ad- 
vertiser. We have a new kind ol "ex- 
posure" which relate- onl) distantl) 
with establishing communications 
((intact with people. The advertiser's 
need for direct information on how 
main people he can expect to view 
hi- ad. al-o ha- gone by the board. 
Some indication of bow distant we 
are from establishing actual commu- 
i Please turn to page 73 < 



II 




Photo courtesy of Falrchild Aerial Surveys 



DAILIES' DROP-OFF 
MORE THAN RADIO'S 



RADIO Advertising Bureau study in five 
markets shows 18 of 19 newspapers fail to 
equal city zone coverage in trading rone 



4 



NEWSPAPERS and radio cover city zone 
well but many stations exceed their city 
zone penetration in getting out to suburbia 



Why radio reach tops the dailies 



^ Radio performs well in building circulation, doesn't 
suffer newspaper drop-off beyond the central area 

^ Major stations reach at least 75% of total audience 
in one week. This is about double the daily figure 



■ on can hang a medium if you 
measure it in one dimension and 
enshrine the medium if you measure 
it in another. 

Take radio. Its average ratings 
aren't hi« and if that's all there was 
to radio's audience, you could kiss 
the medium good-by. 

\ohod\. of course, huys one com- 
mercial on radio and calls it a full- 
fledged advertisement. An "ad ' on 
radio is a cluster of commercials. 
A campaign is a cluster of clusters. 
The end result is not only impact hut 
an accumulation of audience that 
will hear comparison with any medi- 
um carrying the printed word. 

Though this is as simple as A-B-C, 
there's alwavs somebody who will 
pluck a pci -broadcast rating out of 
context and go to considerable trouble 
to prove that a radio commercial 
doesn't reach much of an audience. 



(For an example, see "Newspaper 
promotion stubs its toe," in the 4 
April issue of SPONSOR.) 

Fortunately, radio can not only 
show it reaches a substantial share 
of the potential audience in a reason- 
able amount of time but looks par- 
ticularly good when compared with 
newspapers. 

The Radio Advertising Bureau has 
done studies in a number of markets 
specifically comparing radio and 
newspaper circulation via an area 
yardstick created by the newspapers 
themselves. In comparing the reach 
of radio and newspapers in retail 
trading zones — a newspaper-defined 
area which includes the burgeoning 
suburbs — RAB found a clear-cut su- 
periority for the electronic medium. 

But RAB also found out something 
more. The drop-olT in circulation 
from the inner city zone to the retail 



trading zone — a particular weakness 
of newspapers — did not invariably 
turn up with radio stations in the 
markets studied. 

RAB found that "up to four radio 
stations in every market exceeded 
their city zone penetration in the re- 
tail trading zone." 

On the other hand, 18 of the 19 
newspapers in the five markets sur- 
veyed (Los Angeles, Boston, Chi- 
cago, Buffalo and Detroit) failed to 
equal their city zone coverage in the 
trading zone. The drop-off was as 
high as 70' < in some instances. 

That this situation is not confined 
to the five markets is made clear by a 
previous RAB study of newspaper 
drop-off in the nation's top 50 mar- 
kets. This analysis dug up the follow- 
ing: all newspapers combined reached 
only 42.2 % of homes in the retail 
trading zone. 

Here's an example of drop-off in 
one West Coast market. The five 
newspapers showed a decline in per- 
cent of city zone to trading zone cov- 
erage of from 35 to 89^5 • Three of 
the five dropped off more than 60% 
from the city zone coverage. 

Radio's cumulative audience can 
reach impressive levels — even during 



12 



SPONSOR 



18 April 1059 



One day. \s the 

shows, when station: 



chart . » [ 1 1 » ■ » — 1 1 « - 
and newspapers 



aillllliiiiilllilllliiiiiiiiini 



in tw<> markets arc ranked in order of 
coverage, each station does belter 
than its opposite number among the 
newspapers. \> a matter of fact, if 
you take awaj the leading newspaper, 
even die lowest-ranking radio Btation 

heals, with one exception, all its 
iilliei newspaper competitors. 

Newspaper comparisons aside, it is 

evident that radio stations build up 
audiences with relative ease. All 
but two of the do/en stations listed 
in the KAB analysis reach one out of 
four households on an average week- 
day. This corraling of audience is 
built on a foundation of ratings that 
seldom gets above 5. Indeed, l's, 
2's and 3's are liberally sprinkled 
through any ratings report. 

But there's more to it than that. 
The figures discussed above cover 
one day. Unlike newspapers, where 
a high percentage of home deliver} 
means a low rate of cumulative cir- 
culation buildup, radio keeps on ac- 
cumulating different homes. For ex- 
ample, the average station in Dallas 
reached 30' < of households in the 
metropolitan area during the average 
dav. a January cumulative audience 
Stud} by Pulse showed. Over a week, 
however, the figure was 50%. 

And the buildup doesn't stop there. 
Let's take a look at some NCS #2 
figures, which are basically a meas- 
urement of cumulative audience. NCS 
shows total daytime, nighttime, week- 
ly and monthly figures and thus pro- 
v ides a broad measure of the rate in 
which radio piles up listeners. 

It is dangerous to generalize about 
an area in which there is so much 
variation, but. roughly speaking, a 
major radio station I at least in 1956, 
when NCS #2 was made) reaches 
I 1 I twice as many homes during the 
day as at night (2) about twice as 
many homes during a week as dur- 
ing an average day and (3) about 
10 to 20' i more homes over a month 
than over a week. Nielsen also has 
12-week cumulative figures. Further 
increases in reach are registered dur- 
ing the longer term, but the jump 
is relatively, small. 

What goes this mean? First, that 
the buildup of audience goes on at a 
rapid pace during a week's period. 
Ibis is certainly a contrast with the 
newspaper pattern. While there are 
i Please turn to page 73 1 



SPONSOR 



18 April 1959 



RADIO BEATS NEWSPAPERS IN 
COVERAGE, COST-PER 1,000 

Radio VS. newspapers in trading /.one penetration 

Market "A" Market "B" 

Newspaper Station Newspaper 



Station 



19..':' i 


13.09; 


37.498 


5.3.8' ; 


11.0 


39.8 


18.8 


50.6 


8.6 


33.3 


16.5 


32.6 


7.5 


30.0 


1 1.8 


27.3 


6.6 


26.8 




24.7 


6.4 


18.7 




16.8 



s " Ln " BAB ii ,i. m:. r> for newsi , P ers ami !■• i reached 'luring 

average i in aiii defined 



Cost-per-1,000 newspapers vs. radio 



Medium 



San Francisco 

Cost Circulation 



Cost-per-1,000 



Call-Bulletin 



$1,344 



1 ld.207 



89.60 



Chronicle 



SI. 992 



223.120 



88.85 



Examiner 



$2,128 



257,251 



88.28 



News 



Si. 200 



101.780 



s| 2. 17 



Tribune (Oakland) 



81,835 



205.912 



88.95 



KFRC 



3] 1.600 



82.6 I 



Chicago 



American 


$2,688 


022.900 


$5.75 


News 


$2,976 


547,796 


$5.43 


Sun-Times 


$1,440 


534,063 


$2.70 



Tribune 



s 1,371 



8(.8. I.").-, 



85.01 



WGN 



$1,332 



022,900 



82. 1 I 



Philadelphia 



Bulletin 



$3,360 



(,0.-,.0(,l) 



$4.83 



Inquirer 



>3.3 18 



619,381 



News 



$600 



207.08? 



WFIL 



- 1 . '.22 



164, 



$5.41 
$2.90 
82.85 



K.lio dally weekday circulation. . p \ studies. Newspaper circulation, dally 

total, m:. Septembi 158 1 3BDS Newspaper, black and white page. Radio. 

36 one-minute commercials every half hour 6 a.m. to midnight. Data gathered by II -11 Reps. 









43 



Tv "display ads" 

sell 13 mink stoles 
for Nashville store 



^ Harvey's revolutionizes department store approach 
to item listing with unique spot pattern of live remotes 

^ Rapid-fire item selling proves worth in warehouse 
sale and clicks on consistent 40-spot-per-week schedule 



#%n experiment that may well give 
cynics of department store tv adver- 
tising something to think about is 
underway in Nashville. 

The pace-setting idea is a synthesis 
of everything Harvey's Department 
Store, one of the largest in the South, 
has learned about tv since its initial 
venture in 1950. Specifically, it's 
how to use video for hard-sell, dis- 
play purposes. 

Store president Fred Harvey has 
been a veteran believer in the medi- 
um. Cartoon jingles were an early 
experiment, designed by Harvey's ad- 
vertising agency (Noble-Dury) to at- 
tract youngsters. Placed around chil- 
dren's programs and on weekends, 
they filled an element missing in the 



usual pattern of department store ad- 
vertising. Occasional remote telecasts 
from store windows and various de- 
partments also got a tryout, but the 
effort was not sustained. 

Then last July WSM-TV developed 
a new tack that would enable Har- 
vey's to merchandise numerous items 
in a week-long warehouse sale in a 
rapid-fire, item-listing way. The plan 
called for a daily 10-second I.D. 
saturation schedule utilizing a remote 
camera with close-ups of individual 
merchandise. The audio portion 
came from the booth at the studio 
with short, on-the-button copy. This 
sold merchandise — both large and 
small — so successfully that Harvey 
decided to schedule two more ware- 



lllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllll!ll!lllllli 



VETERAN VIDEO EXPERIMENTER 



FRED HARVEY, president of Har- 
vey's Department Store in Nashville, 
has used tv since 1950. Noiv lie feels 
he lias fauna 1 the formula for success- 
fully displaying — and selling — mer- 
cfiandise on sight. The formula: a 
series of daily remote spot telecasts 
direct from the store; weekend spots 
add hid and family appeal. It needn't 
be expensive, cither, he feels. 




Illllll 



house sales and advertise them in the 
same way. 

Besides sales effectiveness, another 
important conclusion emerged: Tv 
techniques needn't be expensive to 
get results. 

~ Thereupon WSM-TV and Noble- 
Dury pitched today's totally new idea 
— to move, not just remote camera 
equipment, but an entire studio into 
the store. The plan specified live, on- 
the-spot demonstrations of merchan- 
dise throughout the day in a series 
of spots called Tv Shopper's Guide. 
"The idea seemed fantastic at first." 
says Harvey. But to the station's 
boast, "You name it — we'll sell it," 
Harvey fired back. "Bring in the 
gear — we're game for a try." 

The test was scheduled for the 
peak sales months of October and 
November. WSM-TV moved a micro- 
wave unit, camera, a battery r of lights 
and other necessary equipment into 
the fifth floor of the department 
store. 

As a test, 40 spots a week were 
scheduled — 36 live remotes (60 and 
30 seconds) between 9 a.m. and 5:30 
p.m. weekdays and four filmed spots 
(the animated jingle) on weekends. 

Harvey's fashion coordinator 
Juanda McCallum became "tv shop- 
per" in the spots, displaying the mer- 
chandise. Models paraded dresses, 
play clothes, sportswear and other 
women's apparel. Household item- 
were featured, even electric trains. 
Out-of-town viewers were invited to 
mail or phone in orders. Items used 
on camera were not promoted in any 
other medium, says Harvey's sales 
promotion manager Frank Vermilye. 
"Response to the items displayed," 
he says, "proved beyond a doubt that 
we had hit on the proper formula for 
using television to greatest advantage. 
Examples: 

• In a two-week period, women's 
cashmere coat sales totaled more than 
$15,000. 

• One sewing machine demonstra- 
tion produced four telephone orders 
within the hour. 

• Thirteen mink stoles were sold. 
all of the customers asking for "the 
mink stole that was modeled on 
Channel 1. 

After analyzing these results. Har- 
vey signed a 52-week contract for 
the daih remotes. The same schedule 
was maintained about 40 remote 



II 



SH>\M)U 



18 April 1959 




STUDIO IN THE STORE is Harvey's answer to achieving impact quickly and cheaply. Store uses 40 spots a week, 36 of them live remotes 



spots during the week plus four filmed 
spots mi the weekend. The seven or 
eight spot- are usuallv distributed 
evenlj throughout the day, hall in the 
morning, the other half in the after- 
noon with a regular participation in 
the noontime Jud Collins varietv 
-how. locallv produced. The week- 
end animated spots occur in a morn- 
ing kid block on Saturday and late 
afternoon Sundav to catch the whole 
family. These institutional spots bal- 
ance the hard-sell remote schedule 
during the week. 

The schedule can he varied on a 
dav s notice if a heavv concentration 
of spots is desired in the morning or 
afternoon to give an extra push to a 
fast-moving item. Often there is a 
heavv concentration around the noon 
hour. Generally, several items are 
plugged during the day. But occa- 
sionally all of the day's spots will be 
given over to a single piece of mer- 
chandise. Both the "listing" tech- 



nique ol plugging various items and 
the push for single items have paid off . 

In general. Harvej - uses the re- 
mote spot schedule t" plug the current 
best seller in the -tore, new and 
fashion items. \\ ith careful rehears- 
ing, one spot can accommodate sev- 
eral items in a product category. For 
appliances and other hard good-, the 
spots are extended t i two and three 
minutes sometime- to five. 

\ permanent t\ studio now has 
been established in the store I see 
photo i which requires a full-time en- 
gineer and cameraman. \ ermilye 
feels the strongest advantage of the 
-lore studio is flexibility : "Props, 
merchandise, anything needed for 
the commercial- can he substituted 
or changed at a moment's notice." 
He sa\s that even a late deliver) "I 
dresses to the store at 9:45 a.m. one 
morning did not prevent getting them 
on camera properly modeled and 
displaved at 10 o'clock. 



I I'd Harvey, who ha- h ipled his 
ail budgel to accommodate this new 
approach to moving merchandise, 
see> no end to his use and develop- 
menl ol this technique. Harve) was 
a merchandising official at Marshall 
Field before (inning to Nashville in 
1946 and opening his -lore al 5th \ 
Church in the heart of the downtown 
area. Originally housed hehind a 
35-foot front, the -tore now covers a 
whole Mock. It has been using lv 
since the \\ SM-TV sign-on dale in 
September 1950. "We were the lii-t 
department store in the Southeast t" 

take advantage of television," Har- 
\ev claims. "It's the tool with which 
well continue our growth." 

Significantly, Harvey's slogan i- 

" I he store that never stops growing." 
One wiseacre recognized this when he 
phoned the store while remote - bed- 
ule was on to a-k. "When did Har- 
vev"- Imv WSM-TA ?" t* 



SPONSOR 



18 APRIL 1959 



15 



FSR 

[Cont'd from page 33) 

$44.1 million with breakdown as fol- 
lows: 22' * in air media. 51 '< in 
consumer print. IV , in business pub- 
lications and 8% for sales promotion 
and merchandising. Its accounts have 
evidently benefited from their asso- 
ciation with FSR; the agency's client- 
retention record is impressive: Alcoa 
has been with them for 25 years, 
C.I.T. for L3, Fenestra for 36, West- 
inghouse Electric for 13. Libbey- 
Owens-Ford for 18. 

FSR is a careful shepherd of its 
clients' budgets. While it may not 
actually produce the shows, it keeps 
tight rein on production, scripts and 
costs. Alcoa, for example, is current- 
ly on net tv at the rate of 71 times a 
year. Average cost per show for 
everything (time and talent) is $71,- 
000. Thus the cost per commercial 
works out to only $23,600. 

In the FSR concept, the commer- 
cial is all-important. Commercials 
are constantly tested — not simply for 
recall but to establish these points 
which the agency feels are the key 
to a successful sales message: (1) Is 
the commercial important, significant 



in the viewer's life? (2) Is it be- 
lievable'.' (3) Is it applicable to the 
viewer? Unless it is all of these, it 
doesn't much matter whether it is re- 
called or not. 

In its drive for dynamic advertis- 
ing, FSR has made some contribu- 
tions to t\ : 

• Establishing the pattern I through 
its Alcoa See It Now) for non-con- 
sumer advertisers in television. 

• First use of daytime housewife 
tv by an industrial product. This was 
the Fiberglas sponsorship of Arthur 
Godfrey on CBS TV which, inciden- 
tally, FSR says was the first thor- 
oughly merchandised use of tv. 

• Vertical saturation technique, de- 
veloped for Alcoa on NBC TV 
through the use of three and four 
shows in a single day; this is now a 
basic pattern for daytime tv. 

• Use of tv to create dealer traffic. 
This dales back to 1953 and the 
Westinghouse Freedom Rings on 
CBS TV which actually sent an av- 
erage of 15,000 women per week into 
Westinghouse dealer stores for a six- 
month period. 

• First recognition of the maga- 
zine concept for tv. FSR purchased 



both Garroway's Today and Arlene 
Francis' Home long before thev went 
on the air. 

• The "total" concept of tv spec- 
taculars. In 1056. the agency created 
and produced for Alcoa the Christ- 
mastime special. Stingiest Man in 
Town, promoted it to the hilt. Origi- 
nal music and lyrics for the show 
were recorded by Columbia Records, 
the client name and program name 
appeared on the jacket cover. 

No avenue of promotion and mer- 
chandising goes unexplored. One ra- 
dio buy on NBC's Monitor resulted in 
some 8.000 dealer tie-ins on local ra- 
dio: a tv buy drew the support of 
some 12.000 dealers and distributors 
at the local station level. 

FSR has offices in New York, Pitts- 
burgh. Cleveland, Chicago and San 
Francisco. They are not branches; 
each is a complete agency. It also has 
a tv production center in Beverlv Hills 
and an overseas agency in London. 
It has nearly 500 employees, about 
185 of whom own all the stock in 
the agency. It ranks 21st in size 
among U.S. agencies. This summer, 
its New York headquarters, will move 
to 666 Fifth Ave. ^ 








Servicing and Selling the Markets of America 




SYMBOL OF SERVICE 



NTINENT TELEVISION CORPORATE 

Offices: 70 Niagara Street, Buffalo, MOhawk 2600 • 15 East 47th Street, New York City, PLaza 1-3030 



SCREEN GEMS 

i (oiil (I from page '>!! I 

Sheer bigness pin- varied opera- 
tions has other advantages for 
Screen Gems. In the L958-59 season, 
Screen Gems had more than a dozen 
program series in active production. 
Besides the economies dI large scale 
operations, a program venture of this 
size has the added advantage of hav- 
ing more than one \\a\ to move with 
a neu program. Thus a new pilol can 
be made so that episodes could he 
budgeted for $30,000 and up if a 

network sale were in prospect, or at 

iimler $30,000 if the syndication 
route were taken. Tins enabled a pro- 
ducer-distributor to offer a maximum 
ol new pilots each season. 

John H. Mitchell, v. p. in charge 
of -ales puts il (his wa\ : "'Screen 
Gems will use am method or com- 
bination of methods to sell network 
programs as long as they work. That 
may mean selling through \H(" for 
some programs and directlv to the 
advertiser for other-. We're selling 
film programs now. and we'll also 
sell tape when tape programs have a 
market." 

In feature films. Screen Gems has 



-oiied ii- availabilities into packages 
which are -old on a specific term 
basis to stations. \ continuing -np- 
plj nl features is released, and when 
one station completes its run, the 
othei stations in the same mat kei be 
come pii i-pei t ive i I ients. In inter- 
national sales, \\ illiam I ineshi ibei 
note- thai w Idle there is no sw itch 
awa\ from the film standard to be 

expelled in the immediate future, 

there is an important change in 
sales focus. "The new sales poten- 
tial i- in countries just now building 

up their l\ coverage such as Japan. 
Australia. Germain, and Latin \mei- 
ica," he says. We also points to the 
need for long-range planning in dub- 
bing into new languages (such as 
Portugese) which will develop mar- 
kets in time. 

Jerome ll\ams. \.p. in charge ol 

syndication, expects an entirely new 
look for Screen Gems operations in 
that field by next season. "It is no 

Ionizer possible to show a film pro- 
gram to an agenc\ Inner as a network 
series one week and then go hack the 
following week and tr\ to convince 
the same man representing a regional 
client that vou have a new show." 



-. i een < Jems is planning to ha\ i al 
lea-i three showe .< yeai bi 
■ n .iied and pi odu< ed foi s) ndii ation. 
While I lliot, I ngei & I lliol will 
runt inue in produce commercials on 
film, president Stephen I lliol t.dk- 
aboul two vital areas foi tape. "We 

started delivering tape mercials 

in the firsl month- ol 19 »9," he feels, 
'"ami ha\ e also disi overed thai a 
tape-kinescope combinal ion has more 
-peed and cheapness than film iii in- 
dll-l I ial USe. \\ e -ent a l\ iinil tO the 

I' ord \liiiin Co. on a I i idaj night 

and i el in ned w itli a tape. I!\ Monda) 

morning 50 pi ints were deln end on 
Id nun kinescope. It was below the 

COSl ol film, and dim jusl COllldn'l 

have completed the job in thai time." 
Still another direction foi Si reen 
Gems as it passes it? Huh birthchn 
is the acquisition ol stations as an 
independent investment. Station vet- 
eran Norman Loin an left KRON-TV, 
San Francisco, t" become v < reen 
Gems' station operations manager. 
\\ Idle none of these projected -ta- 
tion holdings was finalized a- of this 
week. Screen Gems intend- to make 
one more horizontal addition, to add 
"another leg to the centipede."' ^ 



SERVICING AND SELLING are two key words that dominate the objectives of Transcontinent stations. 
Whether it's... 

• WGR-TV and WGR Radio, Buffalo, blanketing the mighty and prosperous market of Western 
New York known as the Niagara Frontier, or . . . WROC-TV, Rochester, with its 26.5 Tc coverage advantage 
in the thriving 13-county industrial and agricultural area in up-state New York, or . . . WNEP-TV, 
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, with the most powerful transmitter serving Northeastern Pennsylvania, the state*s 
third largest market, or . . . WSVA-TV and WSVA Radio, Harrisonburg, covering the rich and diversified 
Shenandoah Valley area in Virginia . . . 

. . . you'll find the Transcontinent station is well-known as a symbol of service to audiences and a symbol of 
sales to advertisers. Experienced management, intelligent program balance, strong merchandising and promotion 
plans, and a genuine feeling of community responsibility are basic characteristics that advertisers 
profit by when they select . . . 



A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 





*v 





PACKAGE 

THAT NEVER 

STOPS 

SELLING 





ROPICANA 



S 



I I « ft- ■* 




. 







THE ADVENTURES OF WILLIAM TELL 

That's right! WILLIAM TELL never stops selling for you! That's how NTA built 
it. That's how Tropicana bought it. And here's how WILLIAM TELL does it. It starts 
on-the-air where WILLIAM TELL action-packed, costume drama adventure and 
all-family appeal powers the big audience pull. But you haven't seen anything 
until NTA Merchandising gets into the act... gets selling in windows, in stores, 
up and down your chain of distribution. That's how WILLIAM TELL does it for 
Tropicana and can do it for you,too— with a full package of NTA prepared premi- 
ums and big prize contests that tie into your on-the-air "sell" and convert audience 
into customers for you at the point of sale, all free. It's all free— WILLIAM TELL 
streamers, counter cards, posters. And NTA gives you the manpower to make it 
happen... in the package that never stops selling on the air, off the air, every- 
where. It's all part of the buy. . .when the buy is NTA's WILLIAM TELL. Contact: 

A Division of National Telefilm Associates, Inc. 1QY11 A "DTJ f\f^ "D A lUT Q A T? Q 

10 Columbus Circle, N. Y. 19, N. Y. Judson 2-7300 ll J. A Jl XL \J IXXixxllL OA I J Vi 



FEBRUARY-MARCH 




PER 



SHARE OF 
AUDIENCE: 




Proves KONO is your 

BEST BUY 

for Radio Coverage in 

SAN ANTONIO 



— and KONO leads the field 
in PULSE, too. First in all 360 
quarter-hour periods, Monday 
thru Friday. (Jan. 1959) 




JACK ROTH, Manager 

P. 0. Box 2338 
San Antonio 6, Texas 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

The Armstrong Rubber Co., West Haven. Conn., is preparing the 
summer campaign for its Armstrong Tires. The schedules start 4 
May in scattered markets for 18 weeks. Minute announcements dur- 
ing nighttime slots are being purchased; freqencies depend upon the 
market. The buyer is Marion Jones; the agency is Lennen & Newell. 
Inc., New York. 

American Motors Corp., Detroit, is going into over 80 markets 
with a major campaign for its Rambler. The schedules start 24 April 
for an eight-week run. I.D.'s and minute announcements during 
nighttime segments are being used; frequencies depend upon the 
market. The buyer is Betty Powell; the agency is Geyer, Morey, 
Madden & Ballard, Inc.. New York. 

The California Oil Co., Sub. of Standard Oil of Calif., Perth Am- 
boy, N. J., is planning a short-term campaign: its distribution is 
roughly in the Northeastern states. The three-week schedules kick 
off 4 May. Chainbreaks and I.D.'s during nighttime periods are be- 
in^ placed; frequencies varj from market to market. The buyer is 
Trow Elliman; the agency is Batten. Barton. Durstine & Osborn. >>. Y. 

The Procter & Camble Co., Cincinnati. i> going into top markets 
with schedules for its Spic & Span. The schedules start 4 May, run 
for 13 weeks. Minutes during nighttime segments are being bought; 
frequencies depend upon the market. The buyer is Don Procter: the 
agency is Young & Rubicam, Inc., New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

McCormick & Co., Inc., Baltimore, is initiating new schedules in 
various markets for its teas. The 13-week campaign starts this month. 
Minute announcements during daytime periods are being used: fre- 
quencies vary from market to market. The buyer is Chips Barrabee; 
the agene\ is Lennen & Newell. Inc.. New ^ ork. 

Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc., New York, is entering major markets 
throughout the country with schedules for its Vaseline hair tonic. 
The campaign starts 25 April for 20 weeks. Minutes and I.D.'s in 
weekend slots are being placed: frequencies depend upon the market. 
The buyer is Jane Podester; the agenc) is McCann Krickson, N. \. 

The Pharma-Craft Corp., Inc., Sub. of Jos. Seagram & Son, Cran- 
bury, N. J., is kicking off a campaign in top markets for its Ting 
\ntiseptic Medicated Cream foi acne. 1 1 1 « schedules start 27 \piil 
fm eight weeks. Minutes during both daytime and nighttime seg- 
ments are being slotted: frequencies \ar\ from market to market. 
The buyer is Walter Heed: the agency is Cohen & Aleshirc. N. Y. 



50 



SI'ONSOK 



18 aprii. 1959 



In the 

Vancouver -Victoria area 

KVOS TV 
dominates with 
top programming 



Its affiliation with the giant CBS network gives 
KVOS TV unique entertainment power . . . gives 
this station the ability to deliver the most 
popular daytime and night-time shows to B.C. 
viewers. Add to this the top syndicated half 
hour shows, award-winning special features and 
sports events and the largest selection of line 
movies on TV in North America! This kind of 
entertainment power makes KVOS TV the No. 1 
audience station, gives you selling power to 
"talk to" Canada's 3rd market. 

Plus 82,000 TV homes in 
Northwest Washington 





one TV station had to be unique 



-7* 



r 



VANCOUVER OFFICES 1687 W. Broadway. REgent 8-514-1 
STOVIN-BYLES LIMITED -Montreal. Toronto. Winnipeg 
FORJOE TV INC. — New York. Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco 
ART MOORE and ASSOCIATES Seattle. Portland 



SPONSOR 



L8 w'ril 1959 



51 



With new attention on 'equal time', SPONSOR ASKS: 

How do you feel 

about the "equal time" 



With the recent rigid FCC ruling 
on the "equal time" requirement 
for political candidates, station 
men tell SPONSOR their reactions 

Robert Frudeger, president, WIRL, 
Peoria, Illinois 

No broadcaster in his right mind 
would toy with his license. To think 
that everv broadcaster is now placed 
in the ridiculous position of actually 
being forced into such action is in- 
credible. In 1959 it's a foregone 
conclusion that responsible broad- 
casters are seeking qualified edi- 
torial writers, establishing editorial 
committees, and asserting editorial 
i ights o\ i'i the air. 



Equal time 

puts us 

in precarious 

position 



The) have been encouraged to do 
this by those in positions which have 
regulatory power over the licenses of 
the stations. In contradiction they 
are told '"go ahead and editorialize, 
asset I \ out self for vour community, 
and at the same time "you must seek 
out responsible persons to present 
opposite points of view." 

These are two statements that can- 
not live under the same roof of an 
editorial department. In the first 
place, what is "responsible"? The 
editorial is the subjective viewpoint 
of the writer. The "responsible" per- 
-on niu-l In- - 1 j 1 > j • ■< t i \ • ■ I \ selected, so 
in addition to being an editorial 
writer, the broadcaster must now be- 
come a judge. 

Taken literally, anyone who doesn't 
like the editorial can demand eipial 
time and it then becomes the prob- 
lem of the broadcaster to subjective!) 
determine whethei or not thai indi- 
\ idual is responsible. 

Ili i — could be a 24-hour job and 




broadcasters have other things to do. 
Since we are asserting ourselves alter 
the fashion of newspapers, is it con- 
ceivable that the newspaper editorial 
writer should make himself receptive 
to every dissenter's opinion, examine 
each dissenter's background, check 
on every organization to which he 
belongs to determine its stature, and 
once the writer is assured subjective- 
ly that he is "responsible," permit 
the dissenter to write an editorial 
which will be published. And. failing 
to have dissenters present themselves, 
should the newspaper writer then ap- 
ply himself to finding someone who 
has the opposite viewpoint, check him 
out for being "responsible" and then 
ask him to write the opposing edi- 
torial? 

The whole thing when viewed in 
this light becomes ridiculous and 
even more so when we realize that 
this is the present position of the 
broadcaster. 

Those broadcasters who are today 
editorializing deserve great credit, 
for they are assuming risks which 
might very well culminate in a loss of 
position in their industry, il not a 
loss of their license. Certainly it 
would require little change on the 
part of the powers that be to relieve 
the broadcaster of this impractical 
and virtualh impossible obligation. 

Paul H. Coldman, -> vice pres. & 

general manager, KNOE-TV, Noe 

Enterprises, Inc., Monroe. La. 

The "Equal Time" requirements 
as laid down b\ the FCC with regard 
to station editorials and programs of 
a controversial nature are just and 
necessan to help the broadcast li- 
censee operate in the public interest. 
These provisions further assure the 
public the widest possible supplv of 
useful and necessan information to 
help broadcasters make decisions that 
will promote the greatest good for 
each eommunilv served. 

The "fly" in the ointment of the 
broadcaster is the "unclear language 




of section 31 5 pertaining to "Equal 
Time'' for political candidates for 
public office. In its present language 
the FCC can onlv interpret this sec- 
tion as it has done in the Daly case. 



I! e should 
decide who 
deserves 

equal lime 



But this interpretation, paradoxically, 
puts a "halter," indeed a blindfold 
on the broadcasting team that de- 
livers the essential commodity of 
news to the public, the electronic 
news department of radio and tele- 
vision. 

Therefore, it is essential, not onh 
to the broadcast licensee, but in fact 
to the public good, that section 315 
be either re- written or amended so 
that it will really serve the public 
"interest, convenience and necessity," 
instead of being an instrument of 
hindrance as it is now. 

The sight and sound of political 
candidates for public office where 
heard and pictured in news events 
must be exempted from the "Equal 
Time" rule in order to allow the 
broadcaster to perform his dutv in a 
free society in the area of that most 
important of all of the broadcasters 
service to the people the unfettered 
dissemination of news. 

Section 315 should also be amend- 
ed or re-written to provide the broad- 
caster with an opportunity to make 
a reasonable decision as to whether 
there ma\ be some candidates for a 
public office who don'l really deserve 
lo get equal time because they mav 
not represent anv trulv "responsible" 
group of citizens or even a "free 
American ideal, and whose use of 
broadcasting facilities might VCT) 
well be a "mockery" or a sheer waste 
of time. 



Si 



SPONSOR 



vi'uii. 1959 



problem? 



Robert S. Smith, program director, 

II OR radio & ti , \ in ) ork 

In as few words as possible I am 
unalterably opposed t<> the "equal 
timt'"" ruling of the FCC. The law 
was designed to ensure equal rights 
and time for all "responsible' par- 
lies: \cl the recent ruling was too 
literal in its interpretation and allow - 
no discretion 1>\ broadcasters in de- 
termining who is "responsible. It 
creates a monstrous situation for sta- 
tions, and makes them sitting ducks 
for crackpot- and opportunists. 
I'lie Lai Dal\ rulinu's over-all re- 



Hinders the 
free flow 
of news 



suit will be directly opposed to the 
purpose of the law to protect the 
public. It will make it impossible 
for a station in this climate to fully 
live up to its public responsibilities 
as it has in the past. An "equal 
time situation imposed upon elec- 
tion campaigns — a time when the 
dissemination of the news and in- 
formation should be at its height — 
would mathematical!) strangle the 
voice it seeks to safeguard. The sta- 
tion would lack powers to fairly and 
intelligently edit their news. Broad- 
casters would find themselves in a 
predicament where they could not 
equate and schedule and control the 
appearance of each candidate for 
election as he affects the news in his 
local area. In an attempt to comply 
with the "equal time'" law. the 
broadcaster will probably become a 
censor rather than a chronicler. It 
is onl\ step he could take to both 
comply with the regulation and pro- 
tect himself from the problems cre- 
ated by the loss of free news re- 
portage. ^ 





YOUNG 




two more 

top markets . . . for 

effective April 1 
BOSTON 

the new WMEX 

Boston's lowest cost-per-thousand 
Perfect coverage of the trading area 
the area that counts 

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afternoon (21.2$ )* 

WASHINGTON 

the new WPGC 

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and upward bound. 

Watch Washington turn to WPGC 

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ADAM YOUNG INC 



Representing all that's modi in 
i ifi ctivi in radio today 

NEW YORK. 3 E. 54th St. CHICAGO 

ST. LOUIS LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

DETROIT ATLANTA 



SPONSOR 



18 aprii. 1959 



53 



TV NETS 

{Cont'd from page 35) 

and stor) lines which — in prospect — 
have more depth and more potential 
for greater audience identification 
than many shows of this season. 

What are some typical new shows? 
CBS, for example, is trading on the 
current peak of interest in space by 
introducing Destination Space. But 
it's balancing new interests with old 
ones, too — an expansion of the popu- 
lar Lineup to an hour from 30 min- 
utes, buying five new situation com- 
cdics. 

ABC TV has picked up John 
Gunther's High Road, which will be 
a documentary type of production 
filmed in all parts of the world. And 
another famed writer, James Miche- 
ner. will provide the jump-off ma- 
terial for Adventure in Paradise 
which relates exotic Pacific stories. 

Adventure — whether in or out of 
Westerns — is the key to public taste 
this season, in NBC's Allan Court- 
ney's opinion. "Whether modern or 
Western, people like action, mystery 
and tension formats." That's why his 
upcoming new shows include an off- 
beat private eye series, Johnny Stac- 



cato, with a "beat generation" theme: 
and Edge of the Jungle discusses ten- 
sions and motivations of "jungle" 
people in such a posh setting as New 
York's upper East side. 

But there are new wrinkles on old 
themes as well as on new ones. A 
new captain of detectives is Robert 
Taylor I ABC I and a new locale is 
New Orleans in Bourbon Street Beat 
on the same network. 

On NBC Jack Webb"s Black Cat 
will give the "story behind the story" 
written by an anonymous socialite — 
(fictitious I columnist — in San Fran- 
cisco and CBS has some small fry 
things in store: Patty MacCormack 
in Peck's Bad Girl and Dennis the 
Menace. 

Day-by-day analysis of the sched- 
ules (see chart) indicates what the 
networks consider their weakest 
spots: ABC's entire Monday schedule 
will be new plus half of Wednesday 
and Thursday nights, with the re- 
maining evenings fairly pat. CBS is 
making its biggest innovations on 
Tuesday night and in a couple of 
Friday slots. NBC's new entries are 
concentrated on Tuesday and Satur- 
day, with sizable shifts on Sunday, 
Thursday and Friday. ^ 




WBNS Radio 

Columbus, Ohio 

John Blair & Co., Representatives 




The latest Pulse shows out audience 

"-" ; men nnil women uhi<h would 
seem to male /;,s an adult station. Just 
in passing, we are also number one in 
the market. 



BANKS 

(Cont'd from page 40) 

The remotes — featuring recording 
and tv stars, civic leaders, and charter 
depositors — are limited to half an 
hour in length. Part of the buildup 
are on-the-air promotional announce- 
ments bj the station. 

• Checking results, kielmann has 
devised many ways of checking the 
impact of his radio schedules over 
the past 12 years. But a recent one — 
tried last month at renewal time — 
had a double-header effect. Two of 
the three commercials in the quarter- 
hour program made a pitch for help 
— in effect they were bona fide 
help wanted ads. 

Kielmann's checkup worked fast. 
"From the moment the new copy 
went on the air." he savs. "the bank's 
main switchboard was jammed with 
calls from applicants. The personnel 
department was forced to get help 
from other departments to man the 
telephones, book interview appoint- 
ments, and handle the load." 

"\\ hen we analyzed the phone 
calls." savs Central's personnel direc- 
tor Jerry Worthington. "the thing 
that amazed us most was the calibre 
of the applicants. Practicalh all of 
them were college graduates and in- 
cluded former school teachers, busi- 
ness executives and community 
leaders." 

'" \ good music format is giving us 
the right atmosphere for serious de- 
positors." Kielmann feels, "as well 
as ideal employees." Kielmann may 
have been just a little fearful that his 
own tastes and those of his wife, 
former concert and opera singer, 
Helen Gleason. ma\ have dictated his 
choice of a format. This renewal- 
time test dispelled such fears. 

As for other media. Kielmann tie- 
in newspaper, outdoor, and school 
and fraternal house organs with his 
radio schedule. He uses billboards 
at approaches to communities and 
posters at railroad stations with "Wel- 
come'" themes on them. Business 
men. of course, are the targets of 
page ads in Kiwanis, Lions Club and 
other such yearbooks. 

Mow did Kielmann choose his 
12:45 p.m. time slot 12 years ago? 
\<i\ >ini|il\ : It's the hour he's home 
for lunch. He reasons other business 
men ma\ be able to get home at that 
hour, t"". SO thai makes it family 
time. "1 like to listen to good music 
during lunch," he »a\s. ^ 



".1 



SPONSOR 



in \prii. 1959 



To sell Indiana, 

you need both 

the 2nd and 3rd 

ranking markets. 

NOW 
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In this rich, diversified interurbia, automotive manu- 
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contribute their share. Over 1.6 million population — 
$2.8 billion Effective Buying Income! There are two 
major markets in this live sales sector — South Bend- 
Elkhart and Fort Wayne. You can cover both from 
within, with one combination TV buy, and save 10%! 
Add Indianapolis — get all the best in just two buys! 



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THE TAFT STATIONS . . . yesteryear, 
one radio station broadcasting in a sin- 
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and television stations reaching over 
8,000,000 people in key Mid-West anc 
Southern markets. This is progress — 
progress in building and expanding 
modern new broadcasting stations and 
facilities; progress in a growing volume 
of business; and progress in gainful 
results achieved for an ever increasing 
number of advertisers. 
If you are interested in having your 
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is the time to invest them in growing 
Taft Stations. 






Cincinnati, Ohio 



radio and television stations 



WKRCTV 



W 
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v 
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lw llr. Trnn. 



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Sales Representatives: The Katz Agency, Inc., *The Young Television Corp. Sales Office: Radio Cincinnati 
56 SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
Uiat affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



18 APRIL 1959 

Copyright ISM 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO, 



The guessing in bureaucratic circles this week was that the resignation of John 
Gwynne as head of the Federal Trade Commission may eventually be rued by big 
business and the field of advertising. 

While firm against monopoly practices and strict about fair trade and advertising, 
Gwynne had one advantage his successor may not have: the influence to keep Congressmen 
from digging into the record and general policies of the FTC. 

A case in point: two separate legislative committees undertook probes of the FTC during 
Gwynne's tenure, but both were blunted as a result of Gwynne's high standing with his for- 
mer conferes in the House of Representatives. 

Consensus as to where his successor will come from: the ranks of unemployed ex- 
U. S. senators. 



As reported weeks ago on this page, the FCC is getting ready to give up entirely 
on uhf as an important part of tv. 

It will tell the Senate Commerce Committee that it feels an attempt should be made to 
trade uhf space with the military for vhf space just above present Channel 13. 

Meanwhile, the FCC leans toward squeezing in more stations, along the lines advo- 
cated by ABC, by reducing mileage separation standards until the new channels are available. 



Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the House Commerce Committee, 
and the most successful of all pay-tv opponents, now takes dead aim at pay tv by 
wire and cable. 

Harris succeeded in having the FCC cut down its proposed tests of broadcast subscrip- 
tion television to the very restricted limits he favors. The Commission answered his request 
for something similar on the wired variety with the opinion that this sort of intrastate opera- 
tion is not under its jurisdiction. 

So Harris introduced a bill which put the cable type under FCC jurisdiction, and 
which would also require the Commission to refuse to permit any more extended op- 
erations than are to be permitted for the broadcast type. 



The FCC will permit the Class IV, local, radio stations now limited to 250 watts 
power, to come in with applications for powers up to 1 kw. 

It will consider such applications on a "case-by-case" basis, as opposed to the request of 
the Community Broadcasters Association for automatic approval of requests for 1 kw power 
on the part of these local stations. There are approximately 1,000 of these stations. 



The Commission has decided to shorten the time in which applications can be 
filed which compete with already-filed applications for new AM radio facilities. 

The FCC will publish lists of 50 such applications at the top of the list, and will give 
final filing dates. 

The FCC is faced with its largest backlog of applications for new radio stations and 
changes in existing ones — over a thousand wait hearing. 



SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 



57 




Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



18 APRIL 1959 

C*»yrlQht 1951 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The action-adventure show still ranks as the most salable syndication item on 
the regional and local front. 

This was made quite patent in the results from FILM-SCOPE's field-spotter survey just 
conducted among representative stations in all sections of the country. 

Most cogent of the other observations emerging from the inquiry were these: 

1) National spot spending for syndication is up in the matter of minute par- 
ticipations but less, as compared to recent years, for exclusive or alternate sponsor- 
ship. With regional-local money it's just the opposite: sponsorship of the show as an entity 
is rising. 

2. The alternate-week pattern is here to stay. There's little likelihood of a trend back to 
full sponsorship of a syndicated show. Frequency is the shibboleth, and, as KTTV's Dick 
Woollen put it, the "Big reach" concept is more popular than ever. 

3) Program time devoted to syndication has apparently frozen: hardly a single station 
reported a substantial change from last year. 

Program-type stripping seems to be taking hold even on affiliated stations: 
KLZ-TV's Jack Tipton reported success with a daytime comedy strip, a prime-time action- 
adventure strip and a late evening drama strip. 



Two other interesting findings came out of the Field Spotter survey. They were: 

1) Voted among the hottest station sellers of the seasons were (in alphabetical or- 
der) : Decoy, Dial 999, Rescue 8, Three Stooges and Whirlybirds. 

2) Most frequent headaches for stationmen in connection with syndication : (1) 
starting a syndication show in spring or summer with repeats consequently falling into winter; 
(2) looking for an alternate-week sponsor when actually the syndicator had already thor- 
oughly canvassed the field; (3) forced buying decisions on film series in one day when there 
are at most two or three episodes already in the can. 



One way to build up a women's and children's audience for daytime viewing, 
stations have found, is the comedy strip. It's also singularly effective in early eve- 
ning periods. 

There's also apparently some promotional value in having the same re-run show on every 
day of the week. 

CNP's Life of Riley, for example, was able to go into a number of time periods as a 
strip to top mixed programing the same stations offered previously. 

Here are ARB ratings showing what happened after Riley was stripped in certain mar- 
kets, as compared to rating for the show there before: 



MARKET, STATION 

Boston, WHDH, 6:30 p.m. 
Chicago, WNBQ, 12:30 p.m. 
Detroit, WWJ, 8:30 p.m. 
Houston, KGUL, 6:00 p.m. 
New Orleans, WWL, 12 noon 
New York, WCBS, 5:00 p.m. 
Philadelphia, WCAU, 5:00 p.m. 
Nashville, WSN, 4:30 p.m. 



58 



LATEST RATING 


FIRST RATING 


SHOW PRIOR 


FOR RILEY STRIP 


FOR RILEY STRIP 


TO RILEY 


11.4 


8.3 




4.4 


3.3 


2.6 




1.5 


11.8 


9.5 




5.2 


21.0 


16.4 




11.6 


7.1 


6.9 




2.8 


6.2 


6.2 




3.5 


10.7 


2.4 




2.4 


16.8 


8.9 




2.9 




SPONSOR • 


18 


APRIL 1959 



L~- -.-; 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



keep your rye on tin* high-traific tv spenders BUcfa uh drug and soap productl 
.1- potential bankrollcrs of syndication next season. 

If the current tobacco splurge in syndication proves a success, heavily promoted brands 
in these other industries may be tempted into following the same patterns based on cost-per- 
thousand-homes-per-commercial - minute thinking. 



The idea of producing a show outside of the U.S. in order to save on produc- 
tion costs may well be a self-defeating process. 

Reports last week on one such syndication "import" were that it was cutting prices 
considerably below usual levels for a new series. 

The result: lowered prices take away the initial advantage of bringing in the 
show below the $28,000-per-episode level. 

NTA's promotion bonus plan has succeeded in finalizing a number of local 
film deals that might not otherwise have been made. 

William Tell, for example, got off to a slow syndication sales start last fall but has 
picked up partly because of the added incentive to stations and advertisers. 

The NTA plan involves a 10% "give-back" on any and all program deals, with the bonus 
awarded for promotion purposes. 

Tape program producers with syndication in mind are still playing it very 
carefully as far as production costs are concerned. 

Los Angeles stations got off to an early start with one-set shows based on courtrooms, 
police stations, etc., and New York stations replied with shows based on personalities that 
can talk or ad lib. 

Now the Chicago School enters the tape scene with Ding Dong School, brought back 
with Dr. Frances Horwich for fall stripping by ITC. 



COMMERCIALS 



A revolution in the industrial films field may be brewing, with videotape com- 
ing in as a vital link to cut costs and speed time. 

Elliot, Unger & Elliot, for example, got a call from Ford one Friday to do an industrial 
film with 50 prints due on Monday morning. 

The problem was solved this way: (1) A tv camera was sent and a tape recording was 
made; (2) a 35 mm kinescope was copied from the tape; (3) 16 mm prints were struck off. 

A number of film producers are trying to streamline film production time so 
that it will be more competitive with tape. 

Marc Asch of Van Praag Productions, for example, has worked out a 36-hour delivery 
schedule for special film work. 

Such a procedure stands midway between tape's instantaneous "processing" and 
film's conventional 10-day delav. 

Videotape could go a long way toward stirring up more business from local 
retailers. 

In any event, it would help them prepare their commercials more easily and quickly. 
A suggestion from TvB: Let the station wheel a tv camera into the store with a micro- 
wave relay attached and videotape the commercial at the station's studios. 

SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 59 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



18 APRIL 1959 

Copyright I85S 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The report persists in Wall Street that CBS, Inc., is on the verge of acquiring a 
major company outside the electronics field. 

A top officer in the CBS empire, though, says there's absolutely no basis for it. 



If you look back over the history of air media, you might note this correlation: 
As the performer starts to falter or ages, the identification of the brand image 
with the performer tends also to weaken. 

The trick, say knowledgeable admen, is to pick the right moment for the divorce. 



What's making it tougher for the major tv film producers to get Hollywood 
stars to top rank: The smaller producing firms are offering the negatives (for all 
but network use) to the star. 

Case in point: The June Ally son show which has just been sold to DuPont. 



The tv network lineup will deprive the columnists of at least one plaint this fall : 
that the Westerns have shoved women stars out of regular dramatic series. 

In addition to Loretta Young, two other Hollywood luminaries are set with their own 
anthologies: June Allyson and Barbara Stanwyck. 



Here's one for Emily Post: A top-rank agency served as consultant to another 
king-sized agency in helping it garner a multi-million-dollar account. 

The consulting agency has an account in the same field, but the two advertisers are 
not directly competitive. 

Several reps this week expressed themselves as irritated by one of their clan's 
offering some 10 southern tv stations on a group basis. 

According to the disturbed reps, their stations advised them that they had not author- 
ized the instigating station of the group plan to include them or designate any one 
to represent the setup. 

Agencymcn specializing in getting new business say the trend toward the idol- 
atry of numbers is in full flower. 

Instead of using statistics as a base for thsir presentations and then talking with im- 
agination and understanding of theirs and the prospect's business, the pitchmen de- 
pend entirely on figures to make the sale. 



60 



The owners of grand and literary rights — many of them the estates of the authors 
—are enjoying a bonanza from the boom in tv specials. 

Prices being paid for the extended rights to plays and books now range between 
$75-100,000, while the royalties for musicals extend from $125,000 to $200,000. 

Samples: Kiss Me Kate, $140,000; Meet Me in St. Louis, $135,000; Wonderful Town, 
$145,000; Brigadoon, $125,000. 

SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 




TV RADIO MIRROR 
Names the 
GRAND OLE OPRY 
America's 
MOST POPULAR MUSIC PROGRAM 

WSM is pleased that TV RADIO MIRROR, 
in the only nationwide poll of radio listeners, 
has selected the GRAND OLE OPRY as the 
"Favorite Popular Music Program" 
in America. WSM is proud to find the OPRY 
among such distinguished award winners 
as NBC's Monitor, ABC's Breakfast 
Club, CBS' Gunsmoke. 

However, WSM is not surprised. As America's 
oldest commercial radio program, 
the GRAND OLE OPRY has not only given 
thousands of hours of pleasure to untold 
millions around the world, it has literally 
brought a new and deeper dimension 
to the music of an entire nation. 




WSM Radio 

Key to America's 
13th Radio Market 

50 000 Watts • Clear Channel 

Blair Represented • Bob Cooper, Gen. Mgr. 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 61 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



COME AWAY WITH ME LUCILLE, hums Mayor DeLesseps Morrison (I) of New Orleans as 
he tries his hand at the tiller of KNOE's (Monroe, La.) "Merrie Olds" on the way to the Mardi 
Gras parade. Along for ride, James A. Noe, of Noe Enterprises, owners and operators of KNOE 




BARBER'S HERE AND COLGATE'S GOT 'IM: Sportscaster Red Barber (c) is set for his 
show via WPIX, N. Y., to air 15 minutes before and 10 minutes after Yankee home games, co- 
sponsored by Colgate. With Barber, Dan Topping (I), owner, Rudolph Montgelas, pres., Bates 




ADVERTISERS 



Bristol-Myers will assign its new- 
ly-purchased Clairol. Inc. account 
to one of its agencies within the 
month. 

Presently at Foote. Cone & Belding 
la Lever house for Imperial Mar- 
garine), Clairol has alternate weeks 
of / Love Lucy on CBS TV. 

B-M plans to continue Clairol's op- 
eration under its present name, as a 
separate suhsidiary. with its present 
management and personnel intact. 

For its graduate-wedding season 
promotion, Bulova has hought 
into four nighttime NBC TV 
shows. 

The schedule: M Squad, on five al- 
ternate-weeks: one-third of Cimarron 
City; four alternate Mondays of 
Huntley-Brinkley Report: and three 
alternate weeks on The Bob Cum- 
mings Shou . 

Agencx for Bulova: McCann-Erick- 
son. 




"AMBASSADOR SERVICE" is what Mike 
Schaffer. WAVY-TV, Norfolk-Portsmouth mdsg. 
dir. gets, as Esquire boy gets set to tour 
retail stores for station-sponsor promotion 



M'DXSOH 



L8 ipril 1959 



Campaigns: 

• Cheramy launched a i\ cam- 
paign this week in l"> markets, foi 
its April Showers toiletries. The pro- 
motion, to continue for 13-weeks, 
■enters around a search Eor "'Mis- 
April Showers of 1959" conducted 
on "dance party" programs. The 
contest: viewers send in photographs 
and six are selected, each week, to 
appear on the t\ show, with the audi- 
ence selecting the winner-. Agency: 
Ellington & Co. 

• Anheuser-Busch will repeat 
its "Pick a Pair" promotion for Bud- 
weiser this year, to begin sometime 
luring the last week in Ma\ and run 
for two months. The theme will be 
told to the radio and t\ audience via 
a -cries of spots. I he t\ commercials 
will feature the same lad) who posed 
for the print and outdoor lav outs. 
Agencx : 1)" \rc\ . 

• Keddi-Wip is read\ to break 
its spring promotion this week, to 
run for 13-weeks via a spot radio 
campaign waged b) \rthur Godfrey 
on his weekdax a.m. CBS Radio 



show. Theme "I the campaign will 
l>e to urge housewives i" use Reddi- 

\\ ip a- a ■'.-huil-iiit In -trawheii\ 

shortcake. 1 Vgenc) : I ) Vrcy. 

• Clai Doodle, a new item for 

kid- added to the line of Fun Kilt 
lo\-. i- being introduced this month 
to the New York and Los Vngeles 
market-, [he schedule for the formei 
i to run for eight weeks): live par- 
ticipations on Terry-Toon (inns. 
\\<>R-T\ and Little Rascals, W SBC- 
TV. In Southern California, the 
kits will he pushed via Little Ras- 
cals, and Cartoon Express mi MUZ- 
TV and Chucko's Cartoons', K\H('- 
I \ . \genc) : Frank Moreland \<l- 
vertisinfl. Los \iifieles. 

• Glamorene, Inc.. rug and up- 
holster) cleaner- manufacturers, has 
moved into the oven cleaner held via 
it- new Squeeze-On Oxen Cleaner in 
a soft plastic tube. Advertising plans 
will break nationalK this month via 
radio and l\ spots, and print. 

Piel's Beer, for the first lime in five 
months, ha- been knocked out of top 



position in IRB's March Burvej 

of best-liked t \ commen ials. 

The winner: IVfaypo Cereals. 

I lainin - Beei placed -ci end in the 

competition, w ith Piel - Bliding back 

into the number three -pot. 

Financial report: It. I. Babbitt* 
Inc. -how- ;i profit in it- 1958 report 
a -harp reversal ovei the losses ol 
the previous two years. Net income 
in ")!! (560,031, compared with the 

1957 loss ol Sl.l 17 million. 

Strict K personnel: Howard Ea- 
ton, media director of Level Bros, 
succeeds George Vbrams a- chair- 
man of \\ V- Broadcast Advertising 
Committee . . . Raymond ML 

named to the new l\ -created post of 
director of marketing lor the textile 
di\ ision of I . S. Rubber . . . Lau- 
rence Smith, to -ale- promotion 
manager for S\l\ania Lighting Prod- 
ucts . . . \rinand Rivchun, to head 
the advertising and -ale- promotion 
department at I tejm Amsco Corp. 
...('. F. Niessen, to the newlv-cre- 



EASTER EGG HUNT, the first conducted by 
<TVH, Wichita-Hutchinson, attracted sta- 
tion's Easter Bunny and some 5,000 young- 
ters, in search for the 31,000 scattered eggs 



TO SEE HOW BEER IS MADE, Don Rob- 
erts (r), newscaster, KOA-TV, Denver, toured 
sponsor Miller's plant. With him, acct. exec 
S. Lane (I) and Miller distributor J. Levy 





JTHE 5,000th PRESENTATION of the radio story to advertisers and agencies by RAB took 
Jplace last week at the Taylor-Norsworthy agency, in Dallas. Robert Alter (r), RAB's regional 
sales manager, unveils research and sales material for T-N executives (I to r) Helen Barham, 
media dir.; J. B. Taylor, pres.; Melville Mercer, v. p.; Gloria Richardson, creative dir. 





A DOUBLE TAKE: Carol Blake, "Miss 
Movie of the Week" for WCKT-TV. Miami, 
depicts the title of the latest movie on Chan- 
nel 7 — "The Postman Always Rings Twice" 

I I 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



CRASH THE DENVER 
MARKET WITH KOSI 




In Denver the influence station is 
KOSI. Because KOSI has listener 
loyalty — and the folks with money 
to spend. 1 he) respond to KOSI ad- 
vertisers — and buy merchandise and 
services! 

Contact PETRY about KOSI, Den- 
ver! 10% discount when buying KOSI 
and KOBY, San Francisco! 
After Julx, when in Denver, stay at 
the Imperial Mulct. 1728 Sherman — 
downtown. 
For Greenville, Mississippi, it's 



kosi y ^ 



l,000 watts 
I Denver 

Mld-Amerlca Broadcasting Co. 



ated* post of merchandising manager 
and L. S. McCaslin, to coordinator 
of advertising for DX Sunray Oil Co. 



AGENCIES 



Ernest Hodges, Guild. Baseom & 
Bonfigli v.p., asserted that ""the 
eonsumer, not the advertising 
man, is the hidden persuader," 

while speaking before the Association 
of Advertising Men & Women in San 
Francisco last week. 

Hodges' contention: '"Popular nov- 
els and images to the contrary, if the 
consumers don't know what they 
want, they always find out what it is 
they don't want. 

"And let me assure you the con- 
sumer is a regular Mau Mau for 
those who proceed in the jungles of 
marketing without skill and caution." 

Agency appointments: Nestle's De- 
caf Instant Coffee & Tea. from D-F-S, 
to McCann-Eriekson . . . General 
Mills' Korn Kix. Trix and Sugar Jets, 
from Tatham-Laird, to D-F-S . . . 
American Home Foods new Chiquita 
mashed banana products, to BBDO 
. . . Republic National Life Insur- 
ance, Dallas, from Rogers & Smith in 
Dallas, to EWR&r\ . . Norwich 
Pharmacal's Nebs and new product 
development, from Foote. Cone & 
Belding, to Fletcher Richards, Cal- 
kins & Holden . . . Helms Olym- 
pic Bakeries, State Mutual Savings 
& Loan AssociatioTi and Wallace 
Moir Co.. all in Los Angeles, to 
Adams & Keyes. 

More on appointments: Tidy 
House Products Co., with billings at 
$1.5 million, from Earle Ludgin & 
Co., Chicago, to Guild, Bascom & 
Bonfigli, San Francisco with Bu- 
chanan-Thomas, Omaha handling 
the contact end of the account . . . 
Heifetz Pickling Co.. to VYeintrauh 
& Associates, St. Louis . . . C. N. 
Miller Co., Boston, to lugalls-Mini- 
ter-Haughey. Boslon . . . Thomas 
Organ Studios, to Bcckinan, Ko- 
hlitz, Los Angeles . . . Walnut Grove 
Dairy, Clarksville, Tenn.. to Norman 
Malone Associates, Akron . . . 
Nance Dehnarle Co., East Rochester, 
to the Rumrill Co., Buffalo, with a 
radio campaign to start in Metropoli- 
tan New York in Mav. 



timore agency of the same name, 
discussed "How To Make A Small 
Budget Do A Big Job" before the 
National Retail Merchants Associa- 
tion in Miami. 

His definition of a small budget: 
One that "s not as big as your com- 
petitors, or that does not allow you 
to dominate the field. 

Prager's formula for management 
to update advertising techniques: 
"Strive for greater variety in con- 
tent; stronger identity by means of 
a more distinctive format, and closer 
proximity by placing advertising in 
a media close to the public's modern 
living habits." 

Thisa 'n' data: This week marks 
the 50th anniversary of The Charles 
W. Hoyt Co. . .'. All New York 
headquarters staff of Geyer, Morey, 
Madden & Ballard were united last 
week via a move to expanded offices 
at 595 Madison Avenue . . . Ritter, 
Sanford, Price & Chalek, New 
York, has set up a food division to 
service the more than a dozen new 
food and supermarket accounts at the 
agency . . . Gerald Frisch, v.p., 
Jim Nash Associates, industrial de- 
sign firm, contends that a company 
has no business using tv unless its 
trade mark and product is designed 
to meet the "severe demands" of the 
medium — "Unless there is immediate 
brand association between tv adver- 
tising and the product at the point oi 
sale, tv advertising is just a waste of 
money." 

Add random notes: Emerson 
Foote, senior v.p. at McCann-Ericfc 

son, named general chairman of the 
management seminar in advertising 
and marketing, at Harvard. 5-11 July 
. . . Name change: Chew. Harvey 
& Thomas, Philadelphia, become.' 
Harvey & Thomas, with Samuel 
Chew setting up his own agency . . 
New ownership: A group of em 
ployees headed by Harrj Kullen am 
Charles Shugerl. have acquired th« 
stock of The Joseph Katz Co.. \r\ 
York . . . New office: Walker Saus 
sy Advertising. New Orleans, ha: 
opened a Los Angeles branch, witl 
the purchase of the Robert F. Ander 
son Co. . . . Winner: Donah 
Heller, of N. W. A\er & Son. givei 
first awards in WJMJ. Philadelphia' 
50,000 watt contest. 



Edward Prager. head of the Bal- They were named v.p.'s: Fre« 



64 



SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 195' 



Lenient, al led Bates & Co. . . . 
liuth ( I'li'oiK' .mil Itrcmlan llald- 

M'in. ai KM! . . . K. Sykes Scher- 
man. ai ('mnpton . . . Joan Cham- 
x'llain. at Dgilw. Benson & Mather 
. Vi-lhtir Meuadicr. al 1 &B . . . 
W illiam (air. al Y \\ . \\cr & Son 
. . David Malec, I>;m Mitchem 
and Richard Skeen, at The Cramer- 
krasselt (ml. Milwaukee . . .Louis 
Herman, al Ralph Bing Advertising, 

Cle\ eland a- executive \ .p. 

Other personnel nt'Ms: II. Taylor 
- Protheroe. to |>rcsident and general 
manager ol l'a\ lor-Jess op Advertis- 
ing. Akron . . . Mil ford Baker, a 
v.p. at Y&R, in manager <>f the con- 
tact department . . . Hobert Lari- 
mer and Arch Nadler. to copy- 
writers at l>\l) . . . Tom Casey, to 
account supervisor; Hugh Wells, to 
ej group creative director and John 
Jameson. Jr.. group cop) super- 
visor at Tatham-Laird, Chicago . . . 
Rosemary Rohmer, to media direc- 
tor at Hoag S Provandie, Boston . . . 
Thomas Hlanrhard and Merrill 
■proul, to the tv-radio department 
of Campbell-Ewald, Detroit. 



CANADA 






i 



Canada's tv audience has reached 
a new high, according to a re- 
tabulation of the BBM November 
1958 survej . 

The audience trends in tv: 

• Today, the average evening au- 

jKence exceeds the medium's peak 

audience of two years ago. 

There are now 1.1 one-half hour 

periods, with a total tv audience at 

2.1 13 million tv homes. 



Canada will observe its third an- 
nual Radio Week 3-9 May, with 
these objectives in mind: 

1 I To increase radio set sales 

2) Io increase listening audience 

3) To develop a greater awareness of 
the value of radio. 

The week's theme: He in the know 
— Buy a Canadian radio. To promote 
it. the Canadian Association of 
Broadcasters has prepared a Healer 
Promotion Kit. to be sent to radio set 
dealers this week. 

Welcome To Sunwapta: That's the 

ii title of a 20-pa»e booklet CFRN-AM 
& T\ . Edmonton, Alberta, is distrib- 
uting to employees, to acquaint them 



i 



with the histor) •>! the Sunwapta 
l>i oadcasting Co. Ltd. 

Personnel across the border: 
Tommie Dean-, appointed media 
manager "I the roronto office of 
BBDO . . . Vndre Ouimet, to direc- 
tor o! planning foi CBC . , . < iharles 
McGuire, named managei ol the 
Montreal office ol Radio Si l\ Sales, 
Inc. . . . Lyal Brown, to assume ad- 
ditional duties as director ol informa- 
tion sei \ ices tot ( B( . 



FILM 



Prospects of an eventual pinch 

in the future profit- ol film pro- 
ducers in commercials max re- 
sult ill new collaboration be- 
tween the formerly competitive 

New York and llolhuood pro- 
duction center-. 

I a-l Wick. Niu \ "\k I l'\ 

ilini Nathan Zucker vsa- in Holly- 




SPONSOR 



18 April 1959 



65 



17.9 



•- v T 



W 





12.8117.3 




15.4 





17.4 




UP 



...go ratings wherever M-G-M's 
iaff-happy comedies are pro- 

grammed. In Dayton they top all competing 
shows with a big 7.9 rating. ..it's the 
same story in Spokane, where the 
get a whopping 5.4... Ft. Worth reports 
a rating... Memphis ...and Nash- 

ville The OUR GANG comedies make 

good programming $$$ and sense for 
your station, too. Get the full story 
now! Wire or phone 

1540 Broadway N. Y. 36, N. Y. 
JUdson 2-2000 



NOTE: all ratings taken from recent A.R. B. individual city reports. 




wood to talk over possibilities 01 
closer ties between the eastern inde 
pendents and the west coast majors. 
It's not secret that the problem oi 
video tape may be the sharpest spur 
to make new friends out of olc 
competitors. 

Sales: ABC Films reports that first 
quarter billings in 1959 topped last 
year 1>\ 52' < with feature films and 
re-runs the most active sales areas 
. . . Individual pacts reported by 
ABC Films include Jim Boivie to 
WAVY-TV. Norfolk: WBNS-TV, Co- 
lumbus: WSPD-TY. Faducah: WLOS- 
TV, Asheville; KLIX-TV, Twin Falls; ; 
WESH-TV, Daytona Beach: and 
WKJG-TY. Ft. Wayne, plus an Aus- 1 
tralian sales of One Step Beyond to 
Sterling Pharmaceuticals on TCN, 
Sydne) . 

Programs: Screen Gems' newest 
western is The Peacemaker . . . Tow- 
eres of London signed Fredric March 
to star in a Charles Dickens tv film 
stries. 

Honors: NTA reports that its own 
advertising department received three 
awards of the Art Directors Club of 

New York. 

Commercials: HFH Productions 
celebrated its first year in commer- 
cial films . . . Playhouse Pictures' 
commercials decorated by the N. Y. 
Art Directors Club included Ford via 
.1. Walter Thompson and Trewax 
through Ross Advertising . . . Jaek 
Berrh becomes a senior t\ \ .p. at 
Transfilm . . . Plandome Productions 
completed scoring two minute musi- 
cal commercials for Ford. 

Strictly personnel: Ro\ Rogers 
Syndication appointed Joseph F. 
Greene as eastern sales manager 
John >1. Cooper is manager of < BS 
Newsfilm . . . Ceo Lax becomes gen 
eral manager of VI \ International 
from a Paris office . . . Erie H. 
Haiglit resigned from the post of 
NT \ treasurer. 

Production: lit" made a three w.i\ 
move lasl week to widen its act i\ i- 
ties in film, tape and live production, 
with three new managerial appoint 1 
ments as follows: William Beaw 
dine; Jr. as film production man- 
ager, Claude Traverse a> tape pro- 
duction manager and Phillips Wvl- 



66 



SPONSOR 



ltf APRIL 1959 




NSI SURVEY— KALAMAZOO-GRAND RAPIDS AREA 

(4 Counties) 

(Jan. 25-Feb. 21,1959) 

STATION TOTALS FOR AVERAGE WEEK 





HOMES DELIVERED 


PERCENT OF TOTAL 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


Mon. thru Fri. 










6 a.m. -9 a.m. 


17,600 


17,300 


50.4% 


49.6% 


9 a.m. -Noon 


55,500 


32,300 


63.2% 


36.8% 


Noon-3 p.m. 


69,400 


35,200 


66.3% 


33.7% 


3 p.m. -6 p.m. 


68,000 


54,500 


55.5% 


44.5% 


Sun. thru Sat. 










6 p.m. -9 p.m. 


148,700 


95,500 


60.8% 


39.2% 


9 p.m. -Midnight 


134,300 


68,900 


66% 


34% 



BUT... WKZO-TV Will 

Increase Your Mail 

From Kalamazoo -Grand Rapids! 

WKZO-TV reaches more people, gets more action in 
Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids! For instance, NCS No. 3 
gives WKZO-TV more homes — monthly, 'weekly, daily — 
than any other Michigan station outside of Detroit! 

WKZO-TV's tremendous coverage extends to 606,780 
television homes in 34 counties in Western Michigan and 
Northern Indiana. 

Remember also — if you want all the rest of OUtState 
Michigan worth having, add WW TV, Cadillac to your 
WKZO-TV schedule. 

^World's most valuable stamp is the British Guiana Ic black on n: 
dated lS^n, which is insured for $100,000. 



**' 



-5P- 



!f* 



'^w> 



r> 



a 



i. 






WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOOBATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDSKAIAMAZOO 
WWTV — CADIllAC, MICHIGAN 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 
WMBD -TV — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



"WKZO-TV 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • 1000' TOWER 

Studios in Both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids 

For Greater Western Michigan 

AveryKnodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



SPO.Nxii; 



1<°» APRIL 1TV) 



Iy as production assistant to Ted 
Rogers. 

Trade note: Howard Abraham of 
TvB last week pointed to the necessi- 
ty of sales promotion to department 
stores "to survive," and suggested 
uses of slides and mobile tape for 
fast, inexpensive tv commercials. 

Tape programs: KTTV reports 
that three of its shows are now in 
syndication: Divorce Court (through 
Guild). Juke Box Jury (via NTA) 
and Paul Coates (direct). 



Commercial festivals: W ally Koss, 

who intends to hold a commercials 
festival in New York next spring, left 
for Europe last week to inspect the 
London, Cannes, Venice and Edin- 
burgh festivals this season. 



NETWORKS 



CBS TV Stations Division will 
mark its first use of video tape 
for a public affairs program ex- 
change setup in New \ ork, Los 
Angeles and Chicago. 



Henri's dollar buys 
more on WKOW 




Our thanks to Margaret Flood of the 
Mautner Agency for the opportunity 
to prove that a dollar buys more on 
WKOW . . . and it sells more too! 

lien Hovel 
General Manager 



". . . Personal calls on 
the grocery trade by 
WKOW's merchan- 
dising director gave 
added strength to a 
strong spot campaign. 
Displays went up, 
and STAYED UP 
LONGER when store 
and department man- 
agers in the seventeen 
counties we service 
were detailed on the 
selling impact they 
could expect from 
Wisconsin's Most 
Powerful Radio Sta- 
tion.' " 

Wm. J. Lazarz 
L & L Food 
Distributors 
HENRI'S 



Represented Nationally by Headley-Reed 



WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 




The participating stations. \\ CBS- 
TV, KNXT and WBBM-TV, respec- 
tively, will produce on tape and ex- 
change 13 half-hour public affairs 
shows — permitting one and one-half 
hours of programing per week on 
each station. 

Westinghouse has a similar plan 
in operation. 

Mutual is inereasing its newscast- 
ing operation 115% via a raised 
basic standard for its "Newsbeat" 
inserts. 

That standard : At least one news- 
beat per five-minute MBS newscast — 
or a minimum of 34 newsbeats per 
day. 

Mutual initiated its newsbeat pat- 
tern in October, 1957. as exclusive 
special service feeds requested by 
affiliates. 

Network tv renewals for the 
1959-60 season: Chevrolet 

( Camp-Ewald ) . on The Dinah Shore 
Chevy Show. NBC TV . . . U.S. Steel 
(BBDO I . for the Steel Hour, on CBS 
TV alternate weeks . . . Campbell 
Soup i BBDO i will be joined by 
Johnson & Johnson I Y&R ) on 
ABC TV's Donna Reed Show, which 
moves to 8:00 p.m. Thursdays this 
fall . . . P&G (B&B), for This Is 
Your Life. NBC TV. 

Network tv programing notes: 
June Allyson will be starred in a 
new half-hour dramatic series on 
CBS TV this fall for Du Pont 
i BBDO i. in the Monday 10:30 p.m. 
slot . . . Love and Marriage, a half- 
hour situation comedy series joins 
NBC TVs lineup this' fall . . . Mar- 
ian Anderson will star it) Coca- 
Cola's second special this season. 18 
May, on CBS TV . . . The Court of 
Human Relations, a t\ version of the 
radio program, will become a week- 
>la\ series on NBC T\ beginning 22 
June. 2:30-3 p.m. 

(For details on Fall network pro- 
graming plan-, see page 33, this 
issue. i 

Thisa "n" data: The .lack \V rather 
Organization lia> set up an award in 
the t\ writing field: The Lassie 
$15,000 Writer Wards for Merit. 

It's open to professional writers 
whose scripts arc purchased between 
now and 1 September l<>r the new 



68 



Sl'ONSOK 



18 iPRIL 1959 



Lassie series . . . UJC Radio pre- 
miered a new Ted Lloyd, Inc. pack- 
age last week: The Sound oj )<nn 
Life, a five-minute show heard twice 
<lai!\ weekdays, and five times each 
on Saturday and Sunda) . 

Pereonnel-ly speaking: Hank 
Warner, to director of press infor- 
mation at CBS T\ . . . Vrt Foley, 

promoted to VBC trade press editor. 



RADIO STATIONS 



The trend among the bigh-pow* 
ered stations to Btep up their 
news coverage so as to meel the 
competition from independent 
stations is <iettin«i hotter. 

Latest mo\e in that direction from 
the 50-kilowatters concerns W (.BS 
Radio, \. ^ . It announced this week 
that it was putting OH more news- 
room personnel to bring its listening 
audience broader news coverage at 
the "local and regional level." 

Some of RAB's doings this week: 

• Kevin Sweeney, to the Ft. Worth 
Ad Club explained thai radio is striv- 
ing for a "Chevrolet Image" with 

advertisers: "What Chevrolet repre- 
sents to the car buyer, radio can be 
and is to many advertisers." 

• To dramatize the importance of 
summer selling via radio. RAB sales- 
men are making the rounds to lead- 
ing advertisers donned in straw hats. 

• Robert Coppinger, K \B ac- 
count executive, before the Minnesota 
and South Dakota Bottlers* Associa- 
tion, claimed radio and soft drinks 
have many things in common: "the) 
both reach their peak strength in 
summer. 

• A 1959 Area Sales Clinic. 
planned to start 20 \pril via 16 sepa- 
rate sessions in some 30 cities, to dis- 
cuss radio sales case histories. 

• RAB's trade promotion for Na- 
tional Radio Month: 

1 l "Sell Radio" kits for stations in- 
cluding 101 sales ideas — a collection 
of attention-getting promotions rang- 
ing from the bizarre to the public- 
spirited to create awareness of radio. 
2 1 Commercials on more than 900 
stations during Mav to sing the 
praises of radio. 

The "NAB's contribution to the 
same: Jingles, created by Faillace 
Productions, will be aired on more 
than 1.000 member stations, with the 



theme: Kadi" 
\\ ith ^ on. 



Uwavs In I 



line 



A break for radio station- oper- 
ating in i li<- shadows ot powerful 
Chicago station towers: 

The Kvanstown Chamber ol ( om- 
merce has arranged with all Evans- 
town auto and radio dealers to set 
the push buttons on new ear ra- 
dios SO that two of them would re- 
ceive Evanstown's two radio stations 

\\ EAW and W\M1\ 

Highlights of Westinghouse 
Broadcasting's annual radio 
management meeting in Atlantic 
City, Y J. this week: 

• Program and activities plan- foi 
the coming months, discussed via ses- 
sions on sale-, research, promotion, 
music, news and community service 
programing. 

• The need for a public image fo] 
broadcasters was stressed via a speech 
h\ Michael Santangelo, WBC's di- 
rector of public relations. "Broad- 
casting executives appear in the pub- 
lic eve."' he noted, "as a cross be- 
tween a Brooks Brothers mannequin 
and a circus barker." 

What happens when listeners go 
traveling: Two Rochestarians, visit- 
ing Washington, D. C, sent a note to 
WWDC, accusing the station of 
stealing Rochester's WBBF station 
I.D.'s and weather announcements. 
WWDC's replv : "We bought the jin- 
gles from the same song writers.'' 

Ideas at work : 

• WHK, Cleveland, held a con- 
te-t for bird talkers: the winning 
parakeet said "I like the new WHK 
color radio" so clearly, station taped 
it for station breaks. 

• For the Birds: this one i- a new 
a.m. show initiated on W (iBA, Co- 
lumbus. Ga.. aimed at the 65,000 
servicemen and their families living 
at Ft. Benning. Station has a direct 
line with Benning- short wave radio 
station, hospital and Public Informa- 
tion officer. 

• WII*. Philadelphia's, audience 
greeted the personal appearance of 
nutritionist Carlton Fredericks with 
a SRO sign. To celebrate the first an- 
niversarv of his syndicated show on 
the station. WIP geared his appear- 
ance to 400 person capacity. Some 
1,000 requests for tickets to his live 
broadcast came in. causing the sta- 



tion In -. Indulc .i ml show. \i 

ni\ ei sai j show was pi omoted bo 
\ ia on-the ah Bpots. 

• W \l)>. \ii-onia. I "tin . i- 

ing a "Battle of the D.j.'s". Sponsored 

\>\ the Kadi" I ent< i Vppliam i I »• 
■ I -. station d.j. - are competing to 
w bich man cart hue the most busim -- 
int" the store. I >.|. '- g< I five one- 
minute spots per da\ I" -av anj thing 
w hieli the) feel will draw custom 
I ,ii h pun base counts as a t ote, w ith 
the winning d.j. awarded an aii ■ -on. 
ditioner. 

Station purchases: WEDR, l!ii- 
mingham, to a \\ ashington sv ndi< 
formed In Vincenl Sheehy, Jr., and 
Handlev Marina, for S225,000, bro 

keredb) Blackburn & Co.... W ETO, 

Gadsden. \la.. to \iimail Kadi" Sta 
lions. Inc.. for S">.~>.000. brokered bv 
Paul II. Chapman Co. . . . WTTT, 
Jacksonville, 11a.. to Ted and Janet 
Weber of Philadelphia, brokered bv 
Blackburn ^v Co. 

Sports notes: Spanish-speaking 
baseball fans in New York will heat 
the Yankee games in their native 
tongue via WHOM, for Kallantinr. 




BUYING 

RATINGS...? 
COVERAGE...? 
COST PER THOUSAND...? 

Then Check 

MpT shreveport* 

\ 3 ij*,™* 

in America's 71st TV market 



Your PETRY man will till in detaih 
nbc E. Newton Wraj 

abc Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 



£2 

l CHANNEL 



SPONSOR 



18 April 1959 



69 




THE 

RICH 

OKLAHOMA 

MARKET 




TEN TOP SHOWS 
on Channel Five 
each draw over 
one-third of the view- 
ing audience in this three- 
station market. 

RIFLEMAN 58% 
WYATT EARP 57% 
CHEYENNE 53% 
MAVERICK 53% 
POPEYE 48% 

OKLAHOMA BANDSTAND 46% 
LAWMAN 37% 
REAL McCOYS 36% 
ZORRO 36% 
RIN TIN TIN 34% 

Source : Neilsen : 
February, 1959 

KOCO TV has the audi- 
ence . . . and delivers the 
largest unduplicated cover- 
age in Oklahoma. 

CHANNEL 



A. 



A 




Winston and Salem and Progresso 
Brand Foods . . . KGST, Fresno, 
Cal.. will carry Mutual's Game of the 
Day throughout the major league 
baseball season . . . And on the foot- 
ball front, contracts are being inked 
for the 1959 U. of Michigan games 
via WWJ, Detroit, for Burton Ab- 
stract and Tile Co. 



Business notes: De Soto of South- 
ern Cal. for 13-weeks news program 
on KJNX, Los Angeles ... The Wal- 
dorf System, Boston restaurant chain, 
renewed for the fourth year, the Tom 
Russell Show, WEEI, Boston . . . 
The Fairmont Foods Co., for a new 
sports show on WKMH, Dearborn, 
Mich. 

Thisa 'n' data: The Jefferson 
Standard Broadcasting Co. (WBT- 
AM & TV, Charlotte) played host last 
week for Dr. Hans Anton Bausch, 
director-general of radio/tv in South 
Germany . . . Tony Marvin, on his 
daily WABC, New York show, is de- 
voting a segment of it to housewives 
who "want to be a d.j. for a day" . . . 
Anniversary note: The 50th birthday 
of KCBS, San Francisco, was cele- 
brated via a special 30-minute show 
originating from its sister station. 
WBBM, Chicago, with Art Linkletter 
serving as narrator and CBS' Arthur 
Hull Hayes, the keynote speaker. 

Add random notes: A group of 
fm radio stations in Los Angeles 
made a united media presentation 

to execs at Foote. Cone & Belding. 
giving figures on the boom in fm 
listening . . . Weekend Weather Re- 
ports, for Consolidated Edison Co. of 
New York, celebrating its second 
year on W<^XR, New York . . . 
Kudos: WCHB. Detroit, awarded 
for outstanding leadership in promot- 
ing good will, by the National Con- 
ference of Christians and Jews. 



Station staffers: Dale Cowle, 

named executive v. p. and general 
manager, K15IZ. Ottumwa, la. . . . 
Joe Thompson, to general manager, 
KINT. El Paso. Uso to the Texas 
station: Jerr\ Jackson. Fred Carr 
and Pal O'Day . . . Luther Bas- 
sclt. lo national sales manager, 
\\S\I. Cincinnati . . . Thomas 
Papich, l<> Los Angeles sales man- 
age] for kbOV Long Beach . . . 



Bob Gregory, to news director of 
KTUL. Tulsa . . . Thomas Tier- 
nan, to the sales staff at KMA, Shen- 
andoah, la. . . . Hillis Bell, Jr., to 
account executive at KIOA. Des 
Moines . . . Carl Smith, to account 
executive at KAKC. Tulsa . . . 
Maury Farrell. to local sales man- 
ager of WBRC. Birmingham . . . 
Ted Schneider, to sales service 
manager of WMCM. New York. 



TV STATIONS 



TvB's Norman Cash pointed out 
the difference between tv and 
print thuswise: 

'"Most of tv's financial support 
comes from the consumer, while most 
of newspaper and magazine revenue 
funnels from the advertiser." To 
document this. Cash pointed to these 
figures: 

In 1958 consumers spent over 
$1.1 billion for new tv sets; $2 
billion for repairs and mainte- 
nance and $300 million for elec- 
tricity to run its sets. 

Meantime, advertisers spent SI. 36 
billion in the medium. 

"In other words.'' Cash noted, "for 
every $100 advertisers put into tv. the 
public spent $2 16." 



Ideas at work: 

• WRCA-TV. New York launched 
last week, its annual '"Bat Boy Con- 
test" for boys between the ages of 
eight and 14 who "want to be a bat 
boy for a day for the New York 
Yankees." Last year the contest drew 
some 48,000 entries. And for the 
adults. WRCA is mailing baseball 
bats to agencv and ad execs to re- 
mind them to "plaj ball. " 

• WTRF-TV, Wheeling, \\ . Ya.. 
promoted the Thin !/</" scries thus- 
wise: A "Nora Charles" fashion show 
was held at the Stone .x Thomas de- 
partment store there, attracting a 
record crowd, and cashing in a rec- 
ord number ol »ales. 

• KTTY. Los Angele> last wick 
kicked off its long-term major pro- 
motion to attract viewers and make 
them aware of the stations channel 
number I I I I . The bit : 1 1 times each 

day, programing is interrupted to 
trlc\ ise a series of II dollar bills, ad- 
vising viewers hovi much each is 
worth il senl i" the station. 



70 



SPONSOR 



18 \i-uii. 1959 



WOW's Farm Sales Team 
Sells Farmers Ever y Day! 

Farmers know them 

personally... they trust 
and believe 
them! 




<?!*> 








FRANK ARNEY 

Assistant Farm Director 

A family-farm operator with 6 years 
on-the-air selling . . . trusted . . . believed! 



ARNOLD PETERSON 

WOW Farm Director 

Seven years of every-day 

service to WOW-LAND farmers! 



Farmers don't buy a $4,000 tractor or a $1,000 load of feed on impulse. They're 
thinking men. They insist on facts and figures — carefully weigh and compare them 
ln-fore they buy. 

The job of selling farmers is half-done if the prospect knows , trusts and believes 
the Salesman . WOW -land farmers do know , trust and do believe Arnold and 
Frank, and the entire WOW Farm Sales-Team. 

If you want to sell threshing machines or toothpaste to the 129,000 Iowa- 
Nebraska WOW area farm families, Arnold and Frank will do it — not once a week, or 
once a mouth but by talking to them man-to-man every day. 



REGIONAL RADIO 

FRANK P. FOGARTY, Vice President and General Manager 

BILL WISEMAN, Sales Manager 

JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY, Representatives 



WOW 



CBS 

AFFILIATE 
N OMAHA AND 
103 COUNTIES 



A MEREDITH STATION — affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



SPONSOR 



1!! april L959 



• \\ ilk spring fashions in womens' 
minds. WBBM-TV , Chicago, is lidd- 
ing a ".Name the Hat contest where 
viewers are to send in names for the 
10 hats that will be shown. Prize: 
An all-expense trip to Hollywood for 
two. 

• To introduce the Ampex Video- 
tape Recorder: WKY-TV, Oklaho- 
ma City, held an open house for ad 
executives, with a live camera captur- 
ing each guests arrival on tape. 
\\ hen llie last visitor was seated, the 
tape was played hack, showing every- 



one how he looked when arriving, 

onl\ minutes hefore. 

Programing notes: KHJ-TV, Los 

Angeles unveiled its "The Mew 
Sound in Sight" to New York time- 
huyers, media supervisors and ac- 
count men in two special telecasts last 
week via WOR-TY. New York. The 
new innovation: \ll KHJ-TV pro- 
grams and features will he showcased 
by original orchestral and animated 
highlights, so that its entire program- 
ing clay is integrated with musical 



NASHVILLE'S 

"better buy" 

station! 



WSIX-TV covering the rich 
tri-state Tennessee Valley 
area with: 

MAXIMUM POWER 

(A whopping 
316,000 watts) 

MAXIMUM TOWER 
HEIGHT 

Tallest allowed in this 
area by CAA . . . 2049 ft. 
above sea level. 

MAXIMUM EFFICIENCY 

To provide by far the 
most effective coverage 
and sales results through- 
out this rich Tennessee, 
Kentucky, Alabama area! 

Represented by: 

H-R TELEVISION, INC. 
CLARKE BROWN CO. 




TENNESSEE 

"must buy 

market! 



The Nashville market is 
Tennessee s richest mar- 
ket .. . 

Check these facts! ! 

\S Fourth in the Mid- 
South (next to Memphis, 
Birmingham and Atlanta) 
with 342,000* TV homes. 

lS Population, 1,965,000 

\S Retail Sales — 
$1,585,308,000 

Nashville is a must buy" 
market and WSIX-TV is 
your "best buy" station. 

Phone or wire today for 
choice availabilities! 

"Source Television Magazine 




and design themes . . . WABC-TY\ 
New York, is talking with Will Rog- 
ers, Jr. ahout the possibility of his 

doing a show in the 11-11:30 p.m. 
slot. 



Thisa *n" data: The University of 
Florida is holding ils first annual 
Broadcasting Dav on 27 April . . . 
WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, will carry 
(> 1 Phillies baseball games this season 
for the Atlantic Refining Co.. Phillies 
Cigars and Ballantine . . . Anniver- 
sary note: w LW-C, Columbus, cele- 
brates its 10th year this month . . . 
WNCT, Greemille. Y C. is holding 
an industrial progress contest, citing 
towns for bringing new industry into 
the area. 

Kudos: Bob Anderson, program 
director of KVAL-TV. Eugene, Ore. 
cited with an appreciation award 
from the Oregon Education Associa- 
tion . . . KOA-TV, Denver, cited by 
the U. S. Armv for outstanding pub- 
lic service . . . KCMT-TV, Alexan- 
dria. Minn, presented with a certifi- 
cate of achievement from the 1 . S. 
\iniv Recruiting Service. 

On the personnel front: Al (Ion- 
slant, appointed station manager of 
KRON-TV. San Francisco . . . Gor- 
don Hellmaiiii. to director of ad- 
vertising and sales promotion for 
Transcontinent Tv Corp. . . . Ed- 
ward Tabor, to general manager of 
KBAK-TV. Bakersfield . . . Jim 
Hobbs. to assistant manager of 
WSPA-TV. Spartanburg, in charge of 
programs and operation . . . Roger 
Grimsby, to telenews specialist at 
KMOX-TV, St. Louis . . . James 
Yergin. to director of advertising 
and promotion at WOR-AM-TV, New 
York . . . Dave Dyke, to direct news 
operations for KETV, Omaha . . . 
Don Menard, to national sales man- 
ager and Robert Doty, local sales 
manager of WTYT. Tampa-St. Peters- 
burg . . . E. Robert Lissit. to news 
supervisor for KYW - TV. Cleveland 
. . . Jim Kniuht. to promotion direc- 
tor, \\ TKI -TV. Wheeling. W. Va. . . 
Dorothy Lomhardo. sales service 
manager. \\ IMY New \ oik . . . 
Herb Jacobs, elected president. Tv 
Stations, Inc. . . . Carl Tinnon, op- 
erations manager, K I \ I. St. Louis 
. . . William Budde, t<> comptroller 
and business manager of KPLR-TV, 
St. Louis. ^ 



72 



SI'ONSOH 



18 w'kii. 1959 



TvB 

{Cont'd from page 11 i 

nications contact with people is fur- 
nished 1>\ ad readership studies. Vc 
cording i<» this approach, a primar) 
SEP reader during 1 ( )">!'> missed eight 
out of 10 black-and-white, full-page 
ads (noted of 20%). 

The criterion used was one id the 
reader of the issue being able to rec- 
ognize having seen an ad when he 
was shown the ad in the context ol 

the entire issue. \\ hatever the imper- 
fections i»f the technique employed, 
the criterion itself seemed a sensible 
one for establishing communications 
contact w ith people. 

A measure <>l communication with 
people seems the onl\ meaningful 
basis for comparing media — a meas- 
ure which will provide direct rather 
than circumstantial evidence. Most 
current media bookkeeping measures, 
including ad page exposure, do not 
lend themsehes to valid intermedia 
cost comparisons. 

K\en then, comparisons will not be- 
come reall) meaningful until there is 
a reasonable measure of effects of 
exposure, since obviously to reach 
many people with little or no effect in 
the advertiser's behalf can have con- 
siderabl) less value than reaching 
fewer people with much effect. 

The fact that such measures are 
dilhcult or less than perfect does not 
reduce the relevance or importance of 
such information to the advertiser. 
nor a medium's responsibility con- 
stantly to improve measurement tech- 
niques. 

I wonder what answer Ben Frank- 
lin would give to the question of how 
many ad page exposures can stand 
on the point of a needle. We certain- 
ly agree with the comments SEP 
makes at the end of its promotion of 
its stud\ : "See it! Study it!"* May 
we suggest you have your research 
people do just this . . . and do it be- 
fore you make any decisions based 
upon it. ^ 

giiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiniiiiiiiiui!iiiiiiiii|£ 

For additional comment on 1 

the Saturday Evening Post's \ 

"Apples and Oranges" adver- j 

tisement see the Commercial | 

Commentary column titled | 
"How those print boys do talk" 

in the 11 April issue of SPONSOR. I 

-?iiiiiiii!ni;iiuniBiiiiniiiiimiiiiii!iiiiii!iiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiHiiiiiiii: 



RADIO REACH 

i Conl 1 1 1 1 om page 1 3 i 

no cumulative audience figures i"i 
newspapers Bimilai to the type pro- 
vided l>\ air rating services, agenc) 
media people agree that the dailj 
newspaper total doesnt build much. 
Indeed, the lack ol newspaper re- 
search on tin' subject suggests there 
is not much to research. 

It must be pointed out that some 

newspapers come with a "built-in 

cuiue. That is. since their total cir- 
culation is high, there i- not as much 
room to accumlate new homes. Ibi- 
i- particularlj true in smaller mar- 
ket-. 

Getting back to the Nielsen cumes, 

the audience buildup figures -how 
at least one more important pattern. 
Bv the end of a week, a radio station 
has reached a substantial share of 
its total audience —probably 75% or 
more in the case of major stations. 
However, this is only significant to 
an advertiser when he buys a fistful 
of spots during a week and. further- 
more, spreads them over the day. 

In many cases the advertiser will 
focus on one block of time. Here he 
will tend to build frequency rather 
than reach. Therefore, to build up a 
substantial homes total, the client 
must go in for longer periods than a 
week. How much longer depends on 
the product, the ad theme, the mar- 
keting problem and the share of the 
ad budget being carried by radio. 
Campaigns of three, four, 12. 18 and 
20 weeks are fairly common. 

Comparing cost-per-1.000 of differ- 
ent media is a tricky job. Despite the 
pitfalls of such comparisons, radio 
generally shows up well. 

The radio-vs. -newspaper chart on 
page 43 shows one such comparison. 
Note that it is based on circulation 
only. There is no effort to reduce the 
newspaper total by measuring just the 
readership of ads. The chart as- 
sumes: (1) that every household re- 
ceiving a newspaper will read a one- 
page ad and (2) that 36 one-minute 
commercials will reach the stations' 
total daily circulation. 

This comparison, put together by 
H-R representatives, ignores the fre- 
quency with which each radio home 
is reached and the bigger cume audi- 
ences built over a week or a month. 
It also gives newspapers credit for 
all circulation, whether or not it falls 
within the market area. ^ 







My Mommy 
Listens to KFWB 
Glamorous, amorous, working 
gal or ladyofleisure . . . most 
mommies in the L. A. area 
listen to KFWB. 

Buy KFWB... first in Los An- 
geles. It's the thing to do. 




6419 Hollywood Blvd . Hollywood 28 HO 3 Slbl 



ROBERT M PURCELL. President and Gen Manager 
MIITON H KLEIN. Sales Manager 
Represented nationally by I0HN BLAIR t CO 



One hundred 

eleven* 

national 

and 

regional 

spot 

advertisers 

know 

Terre Haute 
is not covered 
effectively 
by outside 
TV 

' Basis: 1958 



WTHI-TV — 10 



CBS 
ABC 



TERRE HAUTE. INDIANA 
Represented Nationally by Boiling Co., 
Los Angeles -San Francisco- Boston - New York - Chicago- Dallas 



SPONSOR 



18 april 1959 



73 



IN ILLINOIS RICH 
LAND OF LINCOLN 

• WICS DELIVERS 



UJ 

2 


as much nighttime m-f 
quarter hour domination as 


O 


all area competition com- 


X 


bined. Dec '58 ARB 


> 

r- 


• WICS DELIVERS 


O 


most salesmessage mileage 


o 
© 

© 


— Highest area tower (1000 


ft.) Most area power C/2 


o 


mill, watts) 


Q 


• WICS DELIVERS 


o 


most unduplicated coverage 


V 


— more homes at lower cost 



per 1000 rate 



WICS 



NBC TELEVISION 
SPRINGFIELP-PECATUR 
^CENTRAL ILLINOIS 



4:00 3 STOOGES 
LOW WICS "C" RATES 



AVAILABILITIES: 
YOUNG TELEVISION 



1 

1 

i 




p 

A 


is the 
[ most 
effective 
sales force 
in the 

CHICAGO 

NEGRO 

MARKET 

with 

Chicago's Greatest 

Air Salesman 


1490 kc. 
102.7 mc. 


i^^M^fl 


represented 
by 

Stars 
National, Inc. 


R ?! BILL 
W/ HILL 



Same ownership as WDIA— Memphis 






Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 





Robert M. Watson, chairman of the board 
of EWR&R, joined Kudner Agency this 
week as senior v.p.. member of the execu- 
tive committee and of the board of direc- 
tors. He was chairman of the board of R&R 
before that agency's merger with Erwin 
Wasey. Watsons career with R&R began in 
1940. in the San Francisco office. He moved 
to New York in 1943, and was made v.p. in 
1946. His advancement continued as executive vice president in 
1952, then president in 1955, and in L956, chairman of the board. 

Paul Freyd has been appointed director of 
marketing at BBDO, replacing Ralph Head, 
who recently resigned. Freyd will report to 
Thomas Dillon, v.p. in charge of market- 
ing, research and media. For the past three 
years he has served as special consultant to 
BBDO. He has been in marketing for some 
30 years, including several years as gen. 
merchandise, mgr. for a specialty chain: 

seven years in the merchandise office of Sears, Roebuck: four years 
with an advertising agency; and II years as managing consultant. 

William D. Swanson, general manager of 
KTUL-TV, Tulsa since 1958, has been 
named v.p. <>f Tulsa Broadcasting Co. He 
will continue to serve the t\ station as gen- 
eral manager. Swanson has been connected 
with Griffin Grocery Co.'s broadcast prop- 
erties for more than a decade. He left the 
sales department of KIT L when Channel o 
went on the air in L954, t<> become sales 
manager of the t\ outlet. He was named commercial manager in 
January, 1957. advancing to station manager in November, L957. 



Sam Brownstein has been named national 
sales manager of Broadcast Time Sale-, ac- 
cording to an announcement b\ Carl L. 
Schuele, general manager. In hi> new posi- 
tion. Brownstein, who lias been with the 
firm since October. l'>57. will report direct- 

K to Schuele. Prior to joining BTS, Brown- 
stein was associated v\ith kl l!l and 
KOMI TV, Columbia, Mo. I L953-55) and 
wiihW'WCA. Can. In, I. I 1956-57). He holds a B.S.J. 
and a \l.\. in radio television journalism from the I 





i advertising 
of Missouri. 



, I 



SPONSOR 



L8 \iM(ii. 1959 



. UIliuci J. ui a oci ico. 



Thy do advertisers get more results on WKY RADIO: 




ecause buying is believing 
and more Oklahomans 
believe and listen 
to ^^ Radio than 
to ail other Oklahoma 
City radio stations 
combined. 



ATEST AUDIENCE RATINGS* 



*ion Morn. 

50.7 

20.2 

9.8 

5.1 

4.5 

ptr Jan. March '59 



Aft. 

49.1 

25.5 

5.9 

5.6 

5.5 




The WKY Television Svstem. Inc. 
WKY-TV, Oklahoma City 
WTVT, Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fl< 
WSFA-TV, Montgomery, Ala. 
Represented by The Katz Agency 



SPONSOR 



What management looks for 

This past week the Association of National Advertisers 
announced the completion ol its four-year, $200,000 Adver- 
tising Management Study. 

The seventh and final report in this study is a compre- 
hensive 418-page guidebook titled "Evaluating Advertising 
Effectiveness." It is, in many ways, the most important vol- 
ume in the entire ANA series. 

As Henry Schacte of Lever Bros., chairman of the ANA's 
board of directors points out, modern management wants to 
know more about the effectiveness of its advertising expendi- 
tures, and the ANA outlines a constructive program. 

Included in the guidebook are practical suggestions for 
1 I evaluating markets; 2) evaluating the motives of those 
who buy; 3) evaluating the messages which are used in ad- 
vertising; 4) evaluating the relative effectiveness of advertis- 
ing media; 5) evaluating the impact of delivered messages 
on the media audience. 

The stress which this ANA study places on factual adver- 
tising research is a good indication of what high-level corpo- 
rate managements are thinking about today. We believe that 
this research emphasis will continue to increase in the years 
ahead, and must be reckoned a major factor in all air media 
selling, buying and planning. 

Facts about radio's reach 

We strongly recommend to radio men a serious study of 
the research article on page 42 titled "Why radio reach tops 
the dailies." 

You will find there a comprehensive explanation of the 
audience advantages which radio has over newspapers in 
many markets, and sound reasons to buttress your local and 
spot radio selling. 

Once these facts are thoroughly understood, it should be 
possible to promote radio with greater enthusiasm and vigor. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: A greater under- 
standing of the role of the tv and radio station 
representative, and an increased awareness of 
the many types of services he is now perform- 
ing, beyond merely sales and order-taking. 







lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Who goofed? A recent full-page ad 
of tlie Chicago Sun-Times proclaimed 
it as the Chicago newspaper that 
"young families read more than any 
other paper," showed a picture of a 
presumably-typical "young family." 
A small boy sat on the living room 
floor reading the Sun-Times. The rest 
of the family — mother, father and 
bigger sister were eating tv dinners, 
their eyes fixed on a television set. 

Southern ingenuity: A timebuyer 
lining up a spot radio campaign in 
the South, became intrigued by the 
titles of some of the d.j. shows, passed 
these along: The Cookie Shack (Lake 
Charles, La.), Sisters of The Suds 
(Durant. Okla. i . Groovy Daddy 
( Alexandria, La.) and Music for 
Barefoot Housewives (Gadsen, Ala.). 

Cottontail: At Easter, WQAM, 
Miami, held a contest where citizens 
had to identify, through clues, the 
person portraying the Easter bunny. 
One Miami girl approached a man 
in front of a department store, asked, 
"Are you the Easter bunny?" "No, 
Honey." said the man, "I'm a psychi- 
atrist. Need any help?" 

Sage-brusher: Weekend painter Wal- 
ter ^ ust (weekdays he's editor of 
Encyclopedia Britannica) recently 
had a one-man show in Chicago. One 
series of paintings was called, "A 
Myoptic View in Color of Tv West- 
erns." included such titles as "You 
Take Care of Them: I "11 Get the Other 
Hombre" and "Almost High Noon." 

Tourists: Powell Ensign, exec v.p. 
of Everett-McKinney Reps, will lead 
a tour of admen to Europe next month 
via Swissair. ./ sort of spot flight. 

Observation: "We're only young 
once: after that, we have to think up 
other excuses." —Pat Buttram. CBS. 

Quote: '" \ fellow doesn't have to be 
a failure to lose his job on tv. Just 
drop two points in the ratings and 
you'll find yourself walking around 
with your head in a sack." — An- 
nouncer Hugh Downs in Tv Guide. 

Just thimk! Refunds on Federal in- 
dividual income taxes for 1957 were 
$3.5 billion. $3.6 billion was total 
tax receipts of Federal government 
in 1035. 



76 



SPONSOR • 18 APRIL 1959 



Indiana's 
second 
richest 
television 
market... 




Fort Wayne 



Fort Wayne has ". , mort ./> buying income than ,m\ other Indiana 

television market except Indianapolis. And Wane-TV IS first in Fort Wayne, center ol this vast and 
growing market. Represented by Petry. 



SOURCES S» .n REPORT rEB 59 



©WANE -TV 



© 



FORT WAYNE 



|A CORINTHIAN STATION Responsibilitj in Broadcasting 

KOTV Tulsa • KGI LTV Houston • WAN! & WANE-TV Fort Wayne • WISH & WISH-TV Indianapolis 




WHO SAYS YOU CAN'T . . . ? 





Not only can you put all your eggs in one basket 
in the KERO-TV market — it's the wise thing to do! 
KERO-TV is the only single advertising medium that 
reaches all of the more than a million prosperous 
people who live well and buy lavishly in the 
great Southern San Joaquin Valley — California's 
SUPER-market. And, KERO-TV does more than 
just reach these people. It delivers your sales mes- 
sage with full impact. Entertainment and 
advertising production is in keeping with 
the size, sophistication and spending 
i power of the audience. KERO-TV facili- 
I ties are big-time and are manned with 
W a big-time staff. Presentation of both the 
m ^___^*j0^' programs and the commercials can 
^| stand the scrutiny of the most criti- 

cal agency and client. You getthe 
full treatment, too, with mer- 
chandisingand marketing aids. 
So when the Petry man calls, 
heap the KERO-TV basket high! 

KERO-TV 

CALIFORNIA'S SUPER-market 
J BAKERSFIELD 
CHANNEL 10 NBC 






REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



28 APRIL 1»S9 
*0« ■ copy • 98 a ytar 



PONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



III "J v $ V 




HOW TO SELL 
YOUR MEDIA 
DEPARTMENT 

Modern agency men -a\ 
a media department 
should be merchan- 
dised to clients, staff 

Page 31 

Bowling— tv's 
hottest sports 
success story 

Page 34 



did you know that 

... 95^ of the nation's young homemakers listen to Radio 

each week. 12,000,000 of these young homemakers listen more than 

16 hours every week. Just one more reason why 

Spot Radio is such a powerful sales-maker. 




%. 






Are radio's 
daytime serials 
really tired? 

Page 36 



K0B Albuquerque 

WSB Atlanta 

WGN Chicago 

WFAA Dallas-Ft. Worth 

KOSI Denver 

WANE Fort Wayne 

KPRC Houston 

WISH Indianapolis 

KARK Little Rock 



WINZ Miami 

WISN Milwaukee 

KSTP Minneapolis-St. Paul 

WTAR Norfolk 

KFAB Omaha 

WIP Philadelphia 

KPOJ Portland 

WJAR Providence 

WRNL Richmond 

Radio Division 



KCRA Sacramento 

WOAI San Antonio 

KFMB San Diego 

K08Y San Francisco 

KMA Shenandoah 

WNDU South Bend 

KREM Spokane 

WGTO Tampa-Orlando 

KVOO Tulsa 




Hallmark's 
$80 million 
tv sales pitch 

Page 40 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

The Original Station Representative 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • ATLANTA • BOSTON • DALLAS • DETROIT • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ST. LOUIS 



keeps coming down, a caparison of ^^^J^ and 11 p.m. over 

These average CPMPCMs cover programing between o X 

8eVCnday8: — JAN.-FEB. 1958 

$2.86 
2.97 



NETWORK 

ABC TV 
CBS TV 
NBC TV 
3-Network Average 

It ma} 



JAN.-FEB. 1959 
$2.66 
2.93 



3.43 
$3.01 

on hoi 



new tv 



3.27 
$3.05 



..clipped from Sponsor-Scope (April 18, 1959) 

ABC TELEVISION 



76.2% of Des Moines Listened to Radio 














and more Listened to KRNT Radio 
than all other stations combined! 



During and following a traffic-crippling snowstorm in 
Iowa last month (March 5th), public demand for infor- 
mation about impassable roads . . . concern for where- 
abouts and welfare of relatives was critical! 

Fortunately, most people in this area have learned from 
past experience that KRNT always provides service to 
fill these personal needs. They knew that KRNT would 
help, and a thousand business executives, school prin- 
cipals and individuals used KRNT'S aired-telephone 
interview service with the familiarity of daily routine. 




TOTAL RADIO 

in Des Moines 

Represented Nationally by THE. KATZ AGENCY 



The fact that KRNT is the preferred source of help and 
information in times of emergency stands as proof of 
KRNT's image of dependability in the minds of people 
in Central Iowa. Obviously, KRNT has earned this 
recognition with long-standing excellence in public 
service . . . reliability that is vital in all selling! KRNT 
advertisers know this. They used twice as much KRNT 
Radio in February of 1959 as in the same period a year 
ago. It's no wonder that most people listen to, believe 
in, and depend upon the COMPLETE radio station in 
Des Moines, KRNT TOTAL RADIO! 



According to another recent survey (when there was no 
emergency) ... a depth study by Central Surveys, Inc., 

KRNT RATED AS THE TOP 
DES MOINES STATION: 

• MOST PEOPLE LISTEN TO MOST 

• MOST RELIABLE NEWS 

• MOST BELIEVABLE PERSONALITIES 



SPONSOR 



25 april 1959 



© Vol. 13, No. 17 • 25 April 1959 



R 



THE WEEKLY MACAZINC TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

How media men build prestige 

31 Most progressive agenc) media departments improve their communica- 
tions by internal promotion with staffers, external promotion with clients 

Bowling pays off for local advertisers 

34 Live and filmed howling shows, with their merchandising possibilities 

are showing no decline even with bowling season officially on wane 

Are radio's daytime serials really tired? 

36 CBS v.p. Louis Hausman warns criticism of soapers can win easy ap- 
plause, hut performance of seven CBS serials tops affiliates' programs 

Hints on producing a tv spot sound track 

38 Hints on lniw to besl utilize time and money in creating a sound track 
are found h\ tracing steps of musical production for Campbell-Ewald 

Selling small items with big shows 

40 Fitting t\ programing to seasonal, low-priced product business is problem 
that has been licked by Hallmark, top U. S. greeting card producer 

A $130,000 sales agency for spot radio 

43 Station representative Jack Hasla proposes the organization of NSR, a 

new sales group for national spot radio only; with a $130,000 budget 

Radio takes yogurt out of 'fad' class 

44 Dannon Milk Products finds a consistent radio schedule provides the 
besl mean- to widen ii- appeal, gel new market distribution in hurry 

Radio's first sponsors 

45 Crystal set days of radio and radio advertising are recalled as station 
KCBS in San Francisco celebrates golden anniversary of broadcasting 

sponsor asks: Is "ciirniv.i!" promotion 
good for radio? 

52 With some stations employing liallyl pnblieitv to type listener-hip. 

agency anil station people discuss the propriety of this approach 



FEATURES 

1 ( lommercial ( lommentai j 

58 Film-Scope 

24 iv, I, and Madison 

62 New- X |,|,.,, \\ ,-i.p-l p 

6 New smaket ol the W eek 

62 Picture Wrap I p 

48 Radio Basics 

60 Sponsoi Hears 



17 Sponsor-Scope 

80 Sponsor Speak- 

50 Spot Buys 

80 Ten-Second Spots 

28 Timebuyers at Work 

54 l\ Results 

78 T\ and Radio Newsmake 

57 \\ ashington \\ eek 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heywaid Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 
Art Editor 

Mau:y Kurtz 
Production Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Viskniskki, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiqqins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Dorris Bowers. Administrative Mqr. 

VP Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Eastern Manager 
Robert Brokaw 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 
Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 

George Becker; Charles Eckert: Gilda 

Gomez; Priscilla Hoffman; Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
<49 & Madisonl New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 
Fhone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
M.I Subscriptions: U.S. $8 a year. Canada & 
other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a year 
Other Foreign Countries $11 per year. Single 
copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all cor- 
respondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y 
MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by SPON- 
SOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at 
Baltimore. Md. 

1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



In one food store it quintupled the daily sales of a gardening product. In 

another it quadrupled business for a KNX beer advertiser. A store traffic study 
made by a major food chain revealed that it was the only display that people 
could associate with the product it promoted. Such are the facts about KNX 
Radio's own fabulous Product Peddler ... the most colorful, effective, mobile 
point-of-sale display anywhere. For information about this pr<>r<<i bonus 
merchandising service see your KNX ok CBS Radio Spot Sales representative. 




Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 




SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 19r>9 







Interview with Va: i 




H MM 




VsS^ 




i Leonard Bernstein and the Xeu York l'hdlui 




How 

television 

serves 

its 

public 



Pope John \ Mil 




IF YOU'RE STILL AMAZED b\ the \ IIM I I 

can people 9 insal iable appel ite l"i 
icl.\ ision, j "ii might find the answei 
in the record ol how it Bei ves most ol 
its public most "I the time. 

The 19,000 broadcasts presented bj 
the t • ■ 1 « - v ision netw oi ks in .1 single yeai 
are 1 9,000 responses i" the demands 
and needs "I telev ision'- man) diff< 1 
cut "publics." 

ONE MEASURE of how well |c|r\ i-ii >ll 

serves their needs is supplied bj th( 
audience i t -*l f . Ever) night, for ex- 
ample, during the average minute, (>l 
million people are watching theii tele- 
vision screens, and this numbei grows 
larger ever) year. Week aftei week 
the) transform television into the na- 
tion's biggest theatre, concert hall, 
lecture platform, house "I worship and 
source oi new s. 

\nother index of its performance can 
be found in the annual George Fostei 
Peabod\ Wards— "the Pulitzer prizes 
of broadcasting." Earlier 1 1 » i — month 
all of the networks were honored foi 
their contributions to the medium in 
this gratifying competition in which 
the public reaps the richest rewards. 

FOR THE THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR, the 

Peabodv Committee presented what it 
termed its "most important'" award — 
the one for "Public Service"— to the 
CBS Television Network. The award 
was made for a series of special CMS 
News programs, most of which were 
scheduled at nipht to reach the largest 
possible audiences. 

The committee also honored the Net- 
work for Television Musical Entertain- 
ment (Lincoln Presents Leonard 
Bernstein and the Sew )<>rl, Philhar- 
monic . . ."has inspired a resurgence 
of interest in symphonic music...") 
and for Television Dramatic Enter- 
tainment (Playhouse 90 . . . "stands 
alone among dramatic programs in 
television in aiming at the best . . .") 

IT WOULD SEEM ONLY TOO CLEAR that 

people give more of their attention to 
television than to anv other medium 
of communication simpl) because tele- 
vision gives them so much more of 
what the) want. Vnd because the) find 
so much of what the) want, in such 
even balance, at a single point on the 
dial, the) turn their attention most 
often to the CBS Television Network. 

@ CBS Television Network 



IN SOUTH GEORGIA 

AND 

NORTHWEST FLORIDA . . . 

A NEW 
MARKET 

since Mar. 19th! 

WALB-TV's new 

1,000 FOOT* 

TOWER 

has almost doubled 

the effective WALB-TV 

market in this area ! 



"(Tallest in South Ceorgia 
and North Florida) 



GRADE B POPULATION 
NOW IS: 

730,600 

. GRADE B TV HOMES 
NOW ARE: 

126,200 

Write tor 

new coverage map! 

ALBANY, CA. CHANNEL 10 



WALB-TV 








Raymond E. Carow, General Manager 

Represented nationally by 

Vcnard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 

In the South by James S. Ayers Co. 

One Rate Cord 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Normally, the appointment of a general manager for a Gen- 
eral Motors division wouldn't create much of a stir in the ad 
business. But the naming of Edward D. Rollert as Buick 
general manager revived memories of McCann-Erickson''s 
switch from Chrysler to Buick and caused Madison Ave. 
to mull over the possible consequences to the agency. 

The newsmaker: The choice of Edward D. Rollert as gen- 
eral manager of the Buick division was a surprise to agency row. 
Even people at D. P. Brother, Inc.. agenc) for the Harrison Radiator 
Div., which Rollert now manages, had no inkling of what was in the 
works. Though the Harrison executive knew Rollert was bound for 
a new r post, its exact nature was a mystery. 

Like Edward T. Ragsdale, the man he is succeeding at Buick. Rol- 
lert is an engineer and designer rather than a sales or advertising 
executive. Unlike Ragsdale. who spent 36 years with Buick. Rollert 
has served with a number of GM divisions, a common practice among 
GM executives bound for the top. He is 47 and has spent his entire 
working career with GM, starting with the AC Spark Plug division. 
Inevitably, Rollert's appointment stirred theorizing among admen 
as to the fate of Buick billings, now probably about $15 million, a 
third of it set aside for network tv. With Buick's sales rank dropping 
from third to seventh place, and with some of this slide taking place 
during the tenure of Ragsdale and McCann-Erickson. it was natural 
for speculations to center on this subject. While Ragsdale knew Buick 
and its problems intimately, Bollert will have to start from scratch 
ami ii is unlikch there will be any such heady developments as Rags- 
dale's storied search for an agenc] to replace Kudner. 

One of Rollert's first problems will be to make a decision on 
McCann-Erickson's recommendation for $5 million worth of network 
tv specials in the 1959-60 season. During the current season, the 
Buick ucli video budget, also about 85 million, is split — roughU half 
and half — between seven Bob Hope specials and an alternate week of 
If ells Fargo. In the print area, this is what Buick spent last year: 
Los than $5 million in newspapers, or about half of the 1951 total: 
about 82 million in magazines, down a third from the previous year. 
Buick has dipped into spot tv but the billings are miniscule. 

Though Bollert has not been close to the slam-bang consumer ad- 
vertising battle among auto manufacturers, he is described as the 
type that will roll up his sleeve and pitch into solving any kind of 
problem. Vdmen describe him as a "solid"" type, hut having a streak 

of brilliance with all. He is married and has two >ons. one of whom 
loo to Purdue Ibis father's Mma Mater I. When he has time he 
hunts and fi>hc>. relaxes with bridge and chess. ^ 



SI'ONSOK 



25 April 1959 



NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 

WSBA appoints EASTMAN 





robert e. eastman & co., 



inc. 



national representatives of radio stations 



NEW YORK: 

527 Madison Avenue 
New York 22. N. Y. 
PLaza 9-7760 



CHICAGO: 

333 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago. Illinois 
Financial 6-7640 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Russ Bldg. 

San Francisco. Cal. 

YUkon 2-9760 



DALLAS: 

211 North Ervay Bldg. 
Dallas. Texas 
Riverside 7-2417 



ST. LOUIS: 

Syndicate Trust Bldg. 
915 Olive St. 
St Louis. Missouri 
CEntral 1-6055 



SPONSOR 



25 april 1959 





ijf£ -mm 



. 



« p»it?FiN Woodward* ww 

NEW YORK 17. N Y 



y$%M^* J 



s 



?&* 



Woo 



.,HD. «* 



* 5 ° p * « It. •*• v - 



H£W 






\ot 




N9 147 






THE PGW COLONEL SAYS: 

"We like salesmen 
who know how 

to pick up a check" 

When a PGW sales team wins a sales con- 
test, the members of that team are given a 
party where every winner picks up a check 
... a big one. 

Yes, we like a man who knows how to pick 
up a check ... a sales contest check, a sales 
incentive check or a profit share check . . . and 
we offer all of them at PGW because we like 
salesmen who like to compete . . . and win. 
Don't you? 



P ETERS 5 
G RIFEIN. 




W OODWATRB, mc. 

Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 

NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT HOLLYWOOD 
ATLANTA DALLAS FT. WORTH SAN FRANCISCO 




TV 

market ! 



JACKSON, 
MISS., now 

229,900 

TV homes 

The nation's leader 
in business gain 




by John E. McMillin 



Commercial 
commentary 




So it's creative— so who cares? 

Last fall, when George Gribbin, a "creative" 
man. was named head of Y&R and the ANA at 
its annual meeting was calling for more "crea- 
tiveness' in advertising. I talked with a Colonel 
Blimp-type character who deeply and bitterly re- 
sented what he called. "All this twaddle about 
creativit\ ." 

"It's for the birds, he said harumphing loud- 
ly. "Modern advertising is a business. It is mass marketing, backed 
by careful, scientific research and shrewd, cost-conscious media buy- 
ing. Creativity — bushwah!" 

I grinned when he said this and put him down as one of those 
embittered account, research, or marketing men (there are dozens in 
the agency business) who loathe the ground that copywriters walk on. 

Recently, however, I've been wondering whether I was right. 

There's been such an overwhelming gush of talk about creativity 
in the last year (this week the 4As is devoting an important section 
of its White Sulphur Convention to a creativity panel headed by 
George Reeves of JWT, Chicago I that I'm getting a little suspicious. 

How much of this infatuation is just plain lip service? 

Home, mother, the flag, ami ereativeness 

A few weeks ago, for instance, I read an impressive statement 1>\ 
Marion Harper of McCann to the effect that the production of crea- 
tive ideas is the main business of advertising, and that today's crea- 
tive man has better tools — from research and marketing — than he 
has ever had before. 

I have no reason to doubt that Marion was being wholl) sincere. 
But somehow I couldn't help snickering over his remarks. 

They sounded so dreadfullv statesmanlike. 

In 20th Century advertising circles it has become as important to 
take a strong public stand in favor of creativity as it is to be stead- 
fasti) on the side of home, mother, tlie flag and the Audit Bureau of 
Circulations. 

But when men like Marion Harper, who have almost dedicated 
their business lives to the proposition that advertising is or can be 
practical, factual. COSt-oriented and ruthlessly scientific, begin talk- 
ing about "creativity" I wonder what the) mean. And. for that mat- 
ter what do the resl of u> mean when we prate so gliblv about the 
importance of advertising's '" reative functions? 

I submit thai "creative"' is the most bastardized \\>>nl in the adver- 
tising lexicon. \ml I think it's high lime we re-defined it. 

The individual and personal ingredient 

Let's begin l«\ admitting that the only possible reason for being 
concerned with advertising creativeness is a ver\ practical one. 



SI'ONSOK 



25 kPWL 1959 




arket on the move I 



Pints by the million of luscious, red-ripe, sun-sweet straw- 
berries are on the move . . . out of Florida's rich acres . . . 
into the North's important market centers! From Thanks- 
giving until mid-April, harvesting of king-sized Florida 
strawberries is big business around the MARKET ON THE 
MOVE . . . TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG! Until early March, 
over 90% of the fresh strawberries consumed east of the 
Rockies are shipped from this area! 

The yearly total amount of agricultural products produced 
in the TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG area is roughly a quarter 
of a billion dollars! 

You can capture this rich, ripe market with the STATION- 
ON-THE-MOVE — WTVT — first in total share of audience* 
with 34 of the top 50 programs! WTVT, with highest-rated 
CBS and local shows, penetrates and blankets the MARKET- 
ON-THE-MOVE . . . TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG! 

'Latest ARB 



station on the move . . . 

WTVT 

TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 
(|n Channel 




The WKY Television System, Inc. 
WKY-TV WKY-RADIO WSFA-TV 

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Montgomery 

Represented by the Katz Agency 



SPONSOR 



25 april 1959 



11 



'30.6% 

SHARE OF AUDIENCE , 
6:00 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT | 

JAN. - FEB. - A R B 

KVII-TV's audience is up nearly 

100% since new ownership 

and programming in October. 



NOV. '58 



MAY '58 



FEB. '58 



Commercial commentary continued 




THAT'S NOT ALL!! 

K-7 is first in Amarillo in total 

rating points, three nights out of 

the week — with four of the 

top ten shows. 

let your Boiling man give you the detailed 
story and show you some amazing figures. 

KVII-TV 



amarillo, texas 

a 



C R. "Dick" Worn 
Vice-President and 
General Manager 



Represented 
nationally by the 
Boiling Company 



It springs from the fact— known to all experienced admen — thai 
one piece of copy, one radio or tv commercial, or one print ad ran he 
man) times more effective than another. 

I hese copv differences land they can run higher than 1.000%) 
represent the greatest challenge and most dangerous risk that any 
advertiser faces. They mean that he can get 10c* or $10 of value for 
each dollar of his advertising expenditure. 

And what causes these copy variations.' 

Well, they're due to the differences in the individual abilities of 
the planners, writers, visualizers and producers of finished commer- 
cials and advertisements. 

This is a fact which many businessmen find brutally hard to accept, 
rhey'd like to believe that advertising creativeness I for that's what 
were talking about I is a group or "team" matter — that it can be 
produced automatically by a smoothly organized business machine. 

But it ain't so. Joe. It just ain't so. Creativeness is essentially a 
personal, individual and lonely proposition. And Heaven help vou 
il you look for it except in individuals. 

A talent not a technique 

An e\en more unpleasant fact about creativeness is that it is only 
in part an ability that can be acquired through training, research and 
experience. 

It is true of course that people can develop their creative powers. 
Perhaps BBDO's brainstorming is one good way. I, personally, have 
found, though, that kindness, understanding, encouragement and re- 
spect do more to stimulate creative people than anything else. 

It is also true that facts, research, experience all contribute to the 
creative process. They can be, as Harper says, helpful tools. 

But when you've said this you've said only half the truth. For 
real creativeness, I'm convinced, is a gift, a talent, a spark which 
our grandfathers would not have been ashamed to call God-given. 

If a writer or an artist doesn't have it, then no amount of textbook 
training or merchandising saw) will give it to him. 

The quality of living communication 

Finally, let's recognize that when we use the word '"creative in 
advertising, we mean it in a highly specialized artistic sense. 

Creativeness, as we use it, does not mean merely the ability to pro- 
duce something new and different. It is not merely laboring mightily 
and bringing forth a stone, a sarcophagus or a set of statistics. 

Creativeness on our terms means the ability to produce something 
that is alive — copv that sings, pictures that glow with vitality, music 
that grips the heart. 

This living qualilv is the thing which distinguishes what we call 
creativity from mere inventiveness, ingenuity or productivity. 

\iid win is it important? Because our business is communicating 
with people, and this is the electric spark, the divine lire that makes 
our communication easier. 

I think ii i- a fine thing thai advertising, alter its long drunken 
love affair with dizzying research facts and pompous marketing 
statistics, is returning to an appreciation of creativeness. But let's 
remember thai all we're reallj doing is reaffirming the overwhelming 
importance of the gifted, talented, trul) inspired individual. ^ 



12 



SPONSOR 



2.") tVPRiL 1959 



FARM BOY TAKES BUGGY -RIDE! 

Today's definition of that word "Buggy" 
is a sporty Convertible. Our farmers, here 
in the Land of Milk and Money, are iden- 
tified chiefly by their fat billfolds. 

Here's a rich market of small cities and 
thousands of big dairy farms . . . 42% 
rural and 58% urban . . . where 1 ,350,000 
folks spend $1,750,000,000 in retail sales 
. . . more than 400,000 families enjoying 
Channel 2-CBS Television. 






VYDN R. EVANS, GfcN. v 
' ?^N> V I P ^^ 

SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



THE LAND 
OF MILK 
AND fONEY 
WBAY ch. 2 
GREEN BAY 



REW WEED TELEVISION 



1 J 




'Best Program Series' 



"Best Media Promotion" 



"Best Transportation Advertising' 




Speaking of 





"Best Single Program' 



'Best Live Local Program" 



14 



si'onsok • 2.) wuii. 1959 



''Best Spot Announcement Series" 




Iwards . . . 



presented by 
John Blair 



SPONSOR 



When the Wheeling Advertising Cluh 
recently presented WWVA Radio with 
seven awards for outstanding pro- 
gramming, advertising, and promotion 
(a record number) . . . we were frankly 
pretty proud. 

Because this cherished honor reflects 
tremendous recognition in the com- 
munity, it indicates one reason why 
WWVA is first in every time period from 
6 A.M. to midnight, 7 days a week, in 
46 surrounding counties, and dominates 
the vital half of the $6,000,000,000 
Pittsburgh Tri- State Market that other 
media don't effectively cover. It shows, 
too, that Storer stations consider it im- 
portant to be local stations, as well as 
being known throughout the nation. 

Famous on th<> Local soeneT 

WWYA 

Only fulltime CBS Network Station in 
PITTSBURGH -WHEELING AREA 



25 ipril L959 



"Best Direct Mail' 



PAUL MILLER 
Managing Din; tar 





I © i Stores IRaxiio 

WWVA WJW WJBK WIBG W8PD WGB8 

Whirling Cleveland Dftroil I'hiladrlphia Tolrdo M imi 



15 



a g-r-r-r-rand fact — ¥¥ UAL"I V is first choice of viewers in 

Lancaster, 




AMERICA'S 1 Oth TV MARKET 








CHAN N EL 8 

LANCASTER, PA. 

NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION • Clair McCollough. Pres. 

The MEEKER Company, Inc. • New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 



K. 



sponsor • 2i m'kii. L959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



25 APRIL 1959 

OwyrlfM IMt 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS I NO. 



Tv stations can look to a massive spurt of spot tv activity in June. 

A SPONSOR-SCOPE check this week among major spot agencies indicates: (1) earlier- 
than-usual wrapping up of network needs will make it possible for agencies to embark on 
their fall tv spot buying in a few weeks, and (2) the magnitude of the business will be 
considerably over that of the previous fall. 



Don't be surprised if ABC follows the CBS TV pattern and sets its official 
network option time block at night from 8 to 11 — which means moving it forward 
half an hour. 

However, also like CBS, ABC would go on programing the network from 
7:30 p.m. 

Under the broadcast law, a station can't allocate more than three hours by contract 
to a network in the morning, afternoon, or night, but there's nothing to prevent an 
affiliate from accepting additional programing. 

The tendency among buyers to determine by their own formulas what a radio 
station's rate should be is showing up more and more. 

A Chicago rep last week rejected a radio buy in 10 major markets because the 
client tried to set the rate. 

The formula on which the rate was based: $1 per-thousand-homes for six gross 
rating points per week. 

The same account has evolved a pricing formula for tv, but as yet it hasn't tried to 
impose it when buying. The tv formula: $1.20 CPMH for as many rating points as 
the traffic will bear. 

(See prior item on radio buying tactics for skill in 18 April SPONSOR-SCOPE.) 

NBC-TV will put into effect this fall something it dreamed up a year ago: Setting aside 
an hour on one evening of the week for specials exclusively. 

The period: Friday 8:30-9:30. The sponsors include Hallmark, Rexall, Timex, 
AT&T, Pontiac, Oldsmobile. and United Motor-A/C Sparkplug. 

The fall buying and shopping pace among the tv networks the past week 
was not quite so hectic as it had been in recent weeks. But there were these developments: 

• General Foods renewed Danny Thomas, Ann Southern, and December Bride on CBS. 

• Loretta Young shied away from the NBC Wednesday 10:30-11 p.m. niche, 

which P&G had deemed preferable to Sunday night. 



The three tv networks in February jointly grossed a tidy $48.9 million in 
time sales, 9.5% better than the like month of 1958. 

The LNAR-BAR compiled February billings by network as released via TvB this week: 





m;twork 


1959 


1958 


% 


INCREASE 




ABC TV 


$10,024,460 


$ 8,441,988 




18.7% 




CBS TV 


20,806,220 


19.410,741 




7.2 




NBC TV 


18,036,964 


16,785,315 




7.5 




TOTAL 


$18,867,644 


$44,638,044 




9.5% 


SPONSOR » 


» 25 april 1959 








17 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

If it weren't for the Middle West, this would have been a pretty mediocre new- 
business week for national spot tv. Here's why: 

As usual each year, the New York agencies these days are trying to figure out 
what's left — if anything — in the budgets ending 30 June. Often this account-balanc- 
ing unloosens funds for quick-spending, with spot a favorite beneficiary. 

Spot tv activity out of Chicago the past week included: 

GENERAL MILLS : Upped its Surechamp Dog Food budget considerably in 35 markets 
via Tatham Laird. 

CURTISS CANDY : Debuting in spot tv through Clinton E. Frank, using five Southern 
markets to test a new product, Miracle Ade, a soft drink. 

LEVER's all: Daytime spots for 10 weeks in 20 or more markets via NL&B. 

FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY: A two-week push (KM&J) re Mother's 
Day in the top 40 markets of semi-saturation proportions, spread between daytime and 
nighttime minutes. 

WRIGLEY: Back into tv via Meyerhoff for 26 weeks. 

Among the placements posted out of Minneapolis: 

Gold Seal's Sizz (Campbell-Mithun), a charcoal starter, in 50 markets, night minutes and 
chainbreaks adjacent to male-appeal show; and Hamm's Beer (same agency) in three heavy 
radio as well as tv flights on the West Coast, with the emphasis on the major summer holidays. 

What is perhaps the ultimate in fractional unit sales for a tv network was reached 
this week by ABC TV: It offered a l/12th participation in Diamond Head. 

Boiled down to a simple media equation, this would be a minute on alternate weeks 
in a 60-minute show which carries six commercial minutes. 

Heretofore the lowest unit available was l/6th, or a minute every week in a 60- 
minute program. 

An agricultural-products agency that has taken serious note of the tendency 
among farm-area stations to drop their farm directors is New York's Albert Sid- 
ney Noble. 

This agency, which is now using 106 radio stations and 26 tv stations, disclosed 
this week that whereas a high percentage of radio stations had a farm director there was 
but a smattering of such posts among the tv stations. 

Remarked a Noble executive: "If we decide that radio and tv are getting away from 
bona fide farm programing, we'll look around for some other effective use of the dollars." 

Incidentally, there'll be a $1,000 pot contributed by reps for the pitch that 
farm directors will be making to New York agencies when they meet for their annual 
convention in that city in June. The presentation will serve two purposes: (1) tell an up- 
dated statistical story of the farm market, and (2) convey the new image of the farm 
director. 

Judging from the critical newsprint attention it's already gained, the exit of the Voice 
of Firestone from ABC TV could develop into a hot controversial issue. 

Firestone resented being asked to shift to a later Monday half-hour, but the network 
says this is not the complete story. ABC TV's version is this: 

1) It advised Firestone that its current Monday 9 o'clock spot would not be guar- 
anteed for the fall if the sponsor look a summer hiatus. The Monday 10-10:30 period 
was offered as an alternative. Firestone spurned the offer. 

2) After an interval, Firestone reconsidered and said that 10 o'clock would be 
acceptable. However, by this time the spot had been sold to Liggett ik Myers via McCann. 

3) ABC's next gesture was to offer 10:30-11. but Firestone said that was too late. 
However, the expectation is that, hecause of competitive factors. Firestone will be 

back in tv before very long. Probably via Cuiupbell-Ewald. 

(See 2 May sponsor for article on whether sponsored cultural and information 
shows should get special consideration from the tv networks.) 

18 SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The bows were tied this week on NBC TV'b bonanza from Texaco (Cunningham 
& Walsh) — exclusive sponsorship of the early evening news quarter-hour. 

Cost of the package in time and talent conies to $7.5 million per annum. 

Here's another example of how lavishly Detroit will take to network tv this fall: 
Plymouth is going to spend $225,000 per week for the Steve Allen show (time 

and talent) as compared to 890,000 for the Lawrence Welk series this season. 



Because of the fact that it will have five expensive live hour shows five nights of 
the week, NBC TV figures it will have a better balanced schedule this fall. 

The live hours by night: Sunday, Dinah Shore; Monday, Steve Allen; Tuesday, Ford's 
Tv Finest; Wednesday, Perry Como; Friday, multi-sponsored specials. 



If it meets with the approval of the tv networks, Trendex will soon be adding five 
markets to its present list of 20 rating cities. 

The newcomers, which the service thinks will improve the geographic and city-size spread: 
Pittsburgh, Peoria, Little Rock, Richmond, Va., and Tulsa. 



A special price for the summer has popped up at ABC TV. 

Between now and September, daytime quarters can be had at $7,000 for time and 
talent— a 40% discount. It's available to both current advertisers and newcomers. 

Comparative note: A quarter-hour on CBS TV and NBC TV averages $24,000 
time and talent gross. 



Put General Foods down as an advertiser now pretty well dedicated to the 
"happy" show. 

The networks lately have been told when pitching programs: "Don't talk to us about 
westerns" — the implication being that GF would much rather regale the folks with 
food for laughter than with violence. 

Puzzling side of this philosophy: Can GF, as a mass provider, reach the various facets 
of popular taste in entertainment by sticking predominantly to a single show type 
— situation comedy? 



Point to remember: There can be a noteworthy difference between audience com- 
position and the persons in the family who selected the show. 

As a case in point, take the selector factors for the following three situation come- 
dies based on the March Trendex for everv 100 homes: 



PROGRAM 


MEN SELECTORS 


WOMEN SELECTORS 


UNDER 18 SELECTORS 


Father Knows Best 


24.0 


62.4 


36.6 


Real McCoys 


44.8 


63.2 


43.2 


Danny Thomas 


35.2 


55.2 


40.8 



Note the marked men selectivity of Real .McCoys — evidently due to the fact that the 
humor and characters in this show are far more robust than the other two. 

(Note also that figures total more than 100 because shows sometimes are select- 
ed by more than one person.) 

SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 19 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Twenty advertisers accounted for 57% of all gross tv network time billings 
in 1958. The shares per network from this top 20 came out to CBS, 44%, NBC, 42% and 
ABC, 14%. 

Note how the bulk of the business for the following 20 leaders was about evenly distrib- 
uted between CBS TV and NBC TV: 

ABC TV 

(000) 

$1,999 

427 

640 

3,736 

6,920 

1,464 

225 

3,569 

2,969 

9,857 

67 

407 

1,238 

5,429 

4,109 



ADVERTISER 


TOTAL 




(000) 


P&G 


$50,639 


Colgate 


22,875 


Lever 


21,958 


General Foods 


20,733 


General Motors 


20,593 


American Home 


20,508 


Gillette 


16,132 


Bristol-Myers 


16,073 


R. J. Reynolds 


16,002 


Chrysler 


14,341 


Ford 


12,561 


American Tobacco 


11,252 


Liggett & Myers 


10,850 


General Mills 


10,790 


Kellogg 


10,291 


Pharmaceuticals 


10,174 


Sterling Drug 


9,920 


P. Lorillard 


9,791 


Brown & Williamson 


8,251 


National Dairy 


6,710 



TOTAL 



$320,426 



1,231 
674 

$44,961 



CBS TV 


NBC TV 


(000) 


(000) 


$21,579 


$27,061 


17,518 


4,912 


8,829 


12,489 


11,543 


5,454 


2,502 


11,171 


15,183 


3,861 


3,799 


12,108 


8,248 


4,256 


8,939 


4,094 


3,023 


1,461 


5,104 


7,390 


6,231 


4,614 


1,856 


7,756 


4,433 


928 


6,182 




3,538 


6,636 


1,667 


8,253 


4,928 


3,632 


7,033 







6,710 


42,135 


$133,330 



The Sunday 9-9:30 p.m. period was suddenly thrown open this week by ABC 
TV to advertisers with an action show. 

The network had been planning to go along this fall with Colt .45, but Beech-Nut has 
elected not to renew the western. 

American Machine & Foundry evidently has come around to the view that a bowl- 
ing show may keep the bowling alley people happy but that it doesn't pioneer much new 
territory. 

Hence AMF would prefer to sponsor something other than Bowling Stars (ABC 
TV) next season. 

Thinks AMF: It might be better to get a show that interests non-bowlers. With a 
bowling show, you're talking to yourself. 

(See story on experiences of bowling sponsors, page 36.) 



20 



Chicago reps themselves almost ran out of gas trying to quick-service the 
$100,000 that Chrysler spent via Burnett for a weekend of radio spot to tell about its 
victory in the Mobilgas Economy Run. 

The rush to supply clearances was so hectic that reps often found, after rounding up 
availabilities, that another station in the market had got under the wire by a hair. 

When the excitement died down, some of the reps figured — what with all the long- 
distance calls, not to say teletypes — they had lost money on the deal. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 50; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 62; Washington Week, page 57; sponsor 
Hears, page 60; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 58. 

sponsor • 25 APRIL 1959 






DISTINGUIS] LED 

AWARD TO 
KLZ-TV DENVER 

The \iiitiD I. ni Pont Television \\\\m> fob 
1958 has been presented (<> KI/.-IN Denver, 
Colorado, • • • the <>nl\ station to be bo honored. 

I he citation to K I /- I \ re ited !"i 1 1 1« 

clear evidence in ii- programming polici 
sense ol obligation to participate intimately in 

ommunit) life, for ii- furtherance ol cultural ti 
ditions and identit) in the region ii serves, for its 
willingness i<> devote some ol it- best hours .mil 
talent to program in the public interest, and for 
ii- record of giving substantial time to balanced 
and fair discussion of controversial issues. Specili- 

dl) cited are the presentation ol such basic prob- 
lems >>l communit) concern as the problem <>l 
water, the direction of attention i<> the history, 
traditions and legends <>f Colorado, the extens 

il local and national new s, and a Pan 
rama program which mirrors the communit) to 
itself. Il i- also notable .1- the first radio or tele- 
vision station i<> win an \ward ol tin- Ufred I. 
duPont Awards Foundation for the second time. 

KLZ Radio received the Alfred I. duPont 

Vward in 1 ( )IH. This latest honor to kl.Z- 
TV reflects a continuing philosopln 
of excellence in over-all program- 
ming, a principle of leadership 
to which this compan) 
remains dedicated. 




Hlfrnil.iiuPont 
HmarAs Hnun&rrini 



KLZT\', Denver, Colo. Affiliated with the CBS Television Network 
A Subsidiary of Time, Incorporated 



SPONSOR 



25 u'kii. 1959 



21 



The HOT SHOWS 



I 



^ 




MACKENZIE'S 
RAIDERS 

starring RICHARD CARLSON 



DENVER 

KLZ-TV 



MIAMI 

WTVJ 



42F 39.9 



% 



Share 



^1 

kft£ll 


BOLD 
VENTURE 

starring DANE CLARK 

introducing JOAN MARSHALL 



22.6 RATING 

BEATS Zane Grey Thea- 
ter, Perry Mason, Black 
Saddle, Playhouse 90, 
Lineup, Wyatt Earp and 
many others. 



PHILADELPHIA 



WRCV-TV 



% 



Share 




42.6 



18.9 RATING 
BEATS People Are Funny, 
Lawrence Welk, Cimar- 
ron City, Desilu Play- 
house, Rawhide, Yancy 
Derringer and others. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



23.0 RATING 
BEATS Lawman, Gale 
Storm, Goodyear Thea- 
ter, Ozzie and Harriet, 
Steve Allen, Naked City 
and many others. 



AMARILLO 



KVII 



% 



Share 



35.2 



19.6 RATING 
BEATS GE Theatre, Thin 
Man, Alfred Hitchcock, 
Rawhide, Phil Silvers, 
Ed Sullivan and others. 



SEA HUNT 



starring LLOYD BRIDGES 



KRON-TV 



% 



52.5 

24.0 RATING 

BEATS Dinah Shore, 
Restless Gun, This Is 
Your Life, Cimarron 
City, Ernie Ford, Wyatt 
Earp and many others. 



DETROIT 



WJBK-TV 



% 



Share 



55.6 



29.2 RATING 
BEATS Alfred Hitchcock, 
Dinah Shore, Groucho 
Marx, Texan, Ed Sulli- 
van, Yancy Derringer 
and many others. 






HIGHWAY 
PATROL 

starring BRODERICK 
CRAWFORD 



BOSTON 

WBZ-TV 



51.2 



% 



Share 



22.0 RATING 
BEATS Wells Fargo, Ernie 
Ford, Phil Silvers, Peo- 
ple Are Funny, Desilu 
Playhouse, Wyatt Earp 
and many others. 



ST. LOUIS 

KSD-TV 



% 



Share 



44.9 



27.9 RATING 
BEATS Alfred Hitchcock, 
Wells Fargo, Wyatt Earp, 
Ann Sothern, PeterGunn, 
Ed Sullivan and many 
others. 



ome from ZIV! 



CINCINNATI 



WKRC-TV 



9.6 



% 



Share 



22.7 RATING 
iEATS People Are Funny, 
llfred Hitchcock, Yancy 
|ierringer, Bob Cum- 
lings, Ann Sothern, 
ack Benny and others. 



CHARLOTTE 

WBTV 



% 



498 

29.3 RATING 

BEATS Phil Silvers, 
Texan, Thin Man, Wyatt 
Earp, Ozzie and Harriet, 
Groucho Marx and many 
others. 



BATON ROUGE 



WBRZ-TV 



763 



% 



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47.7 RATING 
BEATS Have Gun - Will 
Travel, Perry Como, Mil- 
lionaire, Lineup, Yancy 
Derringer, Danny Thomas 
and many others. 



ATLANTA 

WSB-TV 



% 



576 

24.3 RATING 
BEATS Danny Thomas, 
Rawhide, Red Skelton, 
GE Theater, Black Sad- 
dle, Ann Sothern and 
many others. 



BIRMINGHAM 

WBRC-TV 



03.U a 

38.8 RATING 
BEATS Lineup, Wells 
Fargo, December Bride, 
Perry Mason, Wagon 
Tram, Peter Gunn and 
many others. 



ROCKFORD 

WREX-TV 



% 



Share 



41.9 

28.0 RATING 
EATS Lawman, Black 
addle, Phil Silvers, Thin 
an, Peter Gunn, Wells 
jrgo and many others. 



COLUMBUS 



% 



Share 



WBNS-TV 

50.4 

34.4 RATING 
EATS Perry Mason, 
jgarfoot, Red Skelton, 
anny Thomas, Peter 
unn. Wanted - Dead or 
live and many others. 



RALEIGH -DURHAM 

WTVD 



74 



% 



Share 



28.0 RATING 
IIEATS Lawman. Danny 
liomas. This Is Your 
jfe, Texan, Trackdown, 
|zzie and Harriet and 
any others. 



CLEVELAND 

KYW-TV 



37.8 



% 



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19.0 RATING 
BEATS Wanted - Dead 
or Alive, Gale Storm, 
Phil Silvers, Ann Soth- 
ern, Cimarron City, Ed 
Sullivan and others. 



SAN DIEGO 

KFMB-TV 



% 



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53.8 

30.5 RATING 
BEATS Rifleman, 77 Sun- 
set Strip, Cheyenne, 
Wyatt Earp, Real Mc- 
Coys, Lawman and many 
others. 



HANNIBAL - QUINCY 



% 



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53.6 

36.8 RATING 
BEATS Black Saddle. 
Rawhide, Steve Allen, 
Yancy Derringer, Garry 
Moore, Thin Man and 
many others. 



SOUTH BEND-ELKHART 

WSJV 



% 



324 

20.5 RATING 
BEATS Groucho Marx, Ed 
Sullivan, D.A.'s Man, 
"M" Squad, I Love Lucy, 
Naked City and others. 



CHICAGO 



WNBQ 



% 



Share 



40.0 

28.8 RATING 
BEATS Wagon Train, 
This Is Your Life, Play- 
house 90, Alfred Hitch- 
cock, Ed Sullivan, Wyatt 
Earp and many others. 



SEATTLE - TAC0MA 



K0M0-TV 



% 



45.3 

29.2 RATING 
BEATS Peter Gunn, Perry 
Como, Alfred Hitchcock, 
Ernie Ford, Wells Fargo, 
Wyatt Earp and many 
others. 



G.RAPIDS-KALAMAZ00 

WKZO-TV 



% 



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42.1 



25.0 RATING 
BEATS Lawman, Peter 
Gunn, Phil Silvers, Zor- 
ro, Patti Page, Buckskin, 
and many others. 



JACKSON, MISS. 

WJTV 



% 



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58.9 

34.5 RATING 
BEATS Steve Allen, 
Desilu Playhouse, Perry 
Como, Maverick, Wells 
Fargo, Playhouse 90 and 
many others. 



The Ziv man in 
your market 
can showyou 
how to profit 
from using 
one of Amer- 
ica's GREAT 
sellingforces 
...a Ziv Show! 



DAVENP0RT-R. ISLAND 

WHBF-TV 



% 



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55.2 



18.3 RATING 
BEATS EUery Queen, Pat 
Boone, Arthur Murray 
Party, Lawman, Donna 
Reed, Patti Page and 
many others. 




JACK GROSS, Vice- 
President, American 
Research Bureau, Inc. 

ARB, in compiling na- 
tion-wide ratings, uses 
a viewer diary kept in 
the home. These diaries 
are the reliable source 
of many Ziv ratings 
shown here. 




FEB. or MAR. 



feudal *°to'" 







or 



GWt 



'<><* ,,AP .uf C»*^ '*cO*P »' 



VJV 



\orY 



tacts 



.or 






325,000 WATTS 



GKLW-TV 



GUARDIAN BLDG. • DETROIT 26, MICH. 



J. E. Campeau. Pres 






-'I 



1 49th anc 



I Madison 



Post-midnight radio 

Naturally, were happy that WABCs 
"Big Joe" Rosenfeld is in the fore- 
front of the case history story on post 
midnight radio, which was so well 
reported in your April 4 issue. But 
what got the tremendous mail and 
phone reaction for us is the fact that 
this story wasn't a puff for WABC. 
hut a real analysis of what makes the 
wheels go 'round. We hope others — 
both stations and advertisers — will 
benefit from this incisive account of 
our experience. 

Ben Hoberman 
general manager 
WABC 
New York 



Your April 1th issue of sponsor 
Magazine proves Joe Rosenfield has 
the right idea about post-midnight 
radio, and the Allegheny County 
Rambler dealers seem to agree whole- 
heartedly Up until April 6. KQV 
in Pittsburgh has had a non-spon- 
sored all-night deejay. Jim McLaugh- 
lin, who goes under the pseudonym 
of "The All-Nite Satellite." 

The Rambler dealers put their 
heads together and decided the low- 
budget ua\ to make Pittsburgh more 
Rambler-conscious was to "orbit" 
with the All-Nite Satellite, — and or- 
biting the) arc. Since April 6 they 
lui\e been riding high and reaping 
the benefits of this 6-hour-a-nighl 
block-buster campaign. 

We at kOV are particularly proud 
of having the first single sponsor for 
an all-nite show in many \ears 
around Pittsburgh. Yes. KQV feels 
Joe Rosenfield and all the Rambler 
dealers have the right idea about 
post-midnight radio. 

Herb Heiman 
cont. dir.. k(,)l 
Pittsburgh 



SPONSOR 



25 april L959 







asty cut 

i (lie March 2J! issue ol SPONSOR 

iiic u;i> a helpful article on t\ 



4 



special 



()i 



' pag 



71 



uue matin 



as apparently dropped on account 

f -pace. It was tn follow the paia- 

raph at the top .if the page begin- 
bg "And this season . . ." and it 
a- in give a comparison ol the spe- 
ials ratings with non-specials ratings 
\ program t\ pes. 

l! the tli npped matter is not too 
ard to locate. I would appreciate 
our passing it along to me. The 
Basing figures would be useful. 

Frederick H. Guidrj 

tv-radio critic 

Christian Science Monitor 

Boston 



U.a.l.r Goidrj b quite . ..rr.-.-l in a--um- 

tli.- Bgara x-r.. dropped Inadvertently In a 
.i> leal-minute cul ilur to s|>ai«- requirement*. 
or ill.- benefit <>f other readers who might <!■■- 
r.- id. figures, «■• 1 «~ t ih.ni below i 



Var. 

All 

Gen 



2 I r» 

2l.:» 



30-mln. 19.0 

30-mln. IK. 2 

f>0-niiti. 

rening SO-min. 

60-min. 22. 3 

,!r..nia SO-mln. 21.2 

hU-min. 18.<> 

Sim. nun 23.2 

IJFeat. drama :l(>-iiiin. 26.1 

60-mln. 2H.o 



nal-ond-crror success 

i our I \|uil stor\ on Bailey-Wagner 
nd its historx as a WWLP advertiser 
vas a fine sani|)le of how case his- 
ories can demonstrate the close re- 
ationships between a t\ station and 
n advertiser. 

Mam case histories reported on in 
he trade journals ofttimes result in 
lOthing but glowing praise for the 
particular medium used extolling 
ts virtues as a cure-all for any sales 
■Toblem. In this instance, however, 
he reporting of the stor\ showed that 
ftcn television- as indeed an\ other 
nedium — has to use the trial and er- 
ror method before hitting on the 
ijdit combination for sales success. 

It also showed, I think, that adver- 
ising on television is much more 
than a matter of buying time. It 
snowed that when an advertiser has 
belief in the station people, as well as 
fn television itself, a successful eli- 
minate for sales is hound to develop. 
Frank J. Doherty, Jr. 
promotion manager 
Springfield Bdcstg. Corp. 
Springfield, Mass. 

SPONSOR • 25 APRIL l ( ).i«) 



COMMERCIAL P 



_ / 




The very air in the PRESTO plant is washed with water pumped at 250 gallons a 
minute from our own private well. The technicians who inspect each presto disc 
have been on the job for a minimum of 15 years, and have the keen eyes that insure 
perfection on a scale no mechanical equipment can match. Ask for presto when 
you order. You'll always know that your discs are PRESTO-perfect. 
bogen-presto CO., Paramus, New Jersey. A Division of The Sicglcr Corporation. 

\^5' Since 1934 the world's most carefully made recording, discs and equipment. 



BALTIMORE? TULSA? 

DALLAS? 

mm 





WO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1 .".20.100 

Households 423,600 

Consumer Spendable Income 

$1,761,169,000 
Food Sales m),486.000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 79.4° SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to December 1958 ARB we average 79.4° of audience from Sign On to Sign Off 7 days a 
week. During 363 weekly quarter hours it runs 80° o to 98° . 



1)1 uu Sales 

Vutomot i\ I- Sales 
Genera] Merchandise 

Total Retail Sales 



| 10,355,000 

- 299339,000 

- i 18.789,000 
-1 286,255.000 



KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 



CBS • A B C 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



Photo: "The 29,000 ba fiery of the Lion Oil Division, Monsanto Chemical 

■■ . I D redo, Irkansai ■ ■ more than "" petroleum product! air madr." 







W 



SI'OIVSOR • 23 \PK1I. \ ( W) 




NO 
END 

IN 
SIGHT 

FOR "MY LITTLE 
MARGIE"... 

NOW IN ITS 

O™ 

RUN 



When you're ahead, you keep playing the same winner. Over 190 stations 
have had tremendous success with strip-programing. Fourth, 
fifth and sixth run, "Margie" has beaten leading network, syndicated 
and local shows. When you can't beat a top show. . . buy it. 

126 programs available. 

NO. 1 RATING... AND THERE'S NO END IN SIGHT. 

New Orleans . . . 4:30 p.m. . . . 22.1 . . . 3rd Hun against American 
Bandstand. 12.4; Four Most Features, 8.1. 

Houston-Galveston . . . 6:00 p.m. . . . 26.6 . . 3rd Hun against World 

At Large- Newsreel, 8.5, Local News ABC News, 5.0. 

Nashville. . . 1:00p.m. . . . 15.7 . . . 6th Run against Home 

Folks Playhouse, 5.6, Beat the Clock. 5.5. 

A Roland Reed Production 






*mw 



OFFICIAL FILMS, INC. 



25 West 45th Street • New York 36. N. V. • PLaza 7-0 1 00 



sponsor • 25 APRIL L959 




OF COLUMBIA 
HOUSEWIVES 



KNOW 
WIS 
BEST* 



Recent qualitative survey 
made by the University of 
South Carolina's Marketing 
Division showed this remarkable 
superiority. 

Get the whole survey 
showing results in 
14 categories from 
your PGW Colonel. 

*91.9% of the housewives 

interviewed named WIS FIRST 

when asked to give call 

letters of Columbia Stations 

they could recall. 




C Richard Shafto, Exec. Vice President 
W Fronk Horden, Managing Director 






Timebuyers 
at work 




Dorothy Classer, Herschel Z. Deutsch & Co., New York, tells 
sponsor, "I love those engraved invitations to lunch — and a 90- 
ininute slide presentation by a station like GOOD. Storecheese, Kan- 
sas. At the Stork, of course . . . where Happy Dan the Morning 
Man greets you at the door so jovial -jovial-jovial . . . where you 
are just about able to grab one 
drink before the lights go down 
. . . where the first 14 slides show 
the new factories being built in 
town — and one of the working 
men's faces is familiar because it's 
the station manager at the scene 
of his new swimming pool . . . 
and in #15 All-Nite Man Tiny 
Tom rolls a mean bandage at the 
Red Cross for public service . . . 
where the sound is turned up so / 

you wont miss any of the nuances 

— and the newscaster announcing winners of the GOOD Teen Award 
sounds like Peter Loire. Or are the\ the names of Titanic sur- 
vivors? It's so hard to tell through that sound bo\ background . . . 
and where the graphs show GOOD first in 3,000 quarter hours out of 
3.000. which is good for a Daytimer. . . . \n\ wa\ . lunch is delicious. 



Anita Wasserman, Lawrence C. Gumbinner Vgency, New A mk. 
feels that station packages need to be simplified and made reasonably 
uniform so that advertisers and agencies can properly appraise their 
bins. "I realize that often packages are complicated because of the 
highl) competitive character of the business.'" Anita sa\s. "Hut this 

package situation has reached the 
point where an agenc) needs an 
army to figure accurately frequen] 
c\ discounts and to separate one 
package from the other. And where 
does it end?" Anita thinks that 
T\ H and R \1'> are the onl) one! 
w ho can (in reel ibis situation, and 
would like to see them establish 
standard packages for the induaj 
tr\. '■Without determining rates 
for the stations," Anita sayaj 
"packages could be devised thai 
would give stations a range of frequenc) discounts to choose from. 
Fixed percentages would be established for fixed frequencies. In 
thai way, the advertiser could quicklj determine what he is buying 
in a package. Such uniformity and simplicity in packages, I feel, 
would be the onlj solution to ibis hopeless rate superstructure. 




28 



SPONSOR 



25 ipril 1959 



KEEP SUMMER SALES |J|>I 
JOIN SMART ADVERTISERS 

SELLING ON KETV 

OMAHA'S FAVORITE STATION! 

Number one in nighttime audience 

More and more advertisers are realizing the impor- 
tance of keeping sales momentum throughout the 
year. In Omaha these advertisers are doing this with 
full minute commercials placed where most Omahans 
see them! 

HERE'S WHAT KETV ADVERTISERS ARE BUYING: 

KETV. . . . 36.4 

Station B 31.0 

Station C 32.5 

Four-Week Feb. -March, '59 Omaha Metro ARB, 6 P.M. to Midnight, Sunday through Saturday. 



Call 



1 - KEf V 



Remember, too, Central Time Zone sets 
in use are the highest of any zone in the 
United States. 

(NTI average sets in use, all time zones, 
July-Aug., 58) 



CL-^-o^w/wjgJc/ 



ABC TELEVISION NETWORK 



eg 

Ben H. Cowdery, President Eugene S. Thomas, Vice President and General Manager Omaha World-Herald Station 

SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 29 




another WJBK-TV FIRST 

in the nation's 5'" market! 



Recent installation of its own and exclusive weather station 
atop its New Center area studios is another audience-building 
first for WJBK-TV — CBS's address for 1,900,000 television 
homes. Actual instrument readings are on camera at the time 
of broadcast giving up-to-the-second, authoritative weather 
information to Detroit and southeastern Michigan. Viewers 
can keep current with the weather by watching WJBK-TV's 
6:25 PM and 11:15 weathercasts nightly. 

Strong programming balanced between CBS and outstand- 
ing local features, complete Video Tape and full color facili- 
ties, have made WJBK-TV Detroit's dominant station over 
its ten-year history. Represented by the Katz Agency. 

Storer Television ?*n w ^' 



Famous on the local scene 

WJBK-TV 

CHANNEL (m2V) DETRO,T 



100,000 Watts • CBS Affiliate • 1057-foot lower 
N.Y. Sales Office: 623 Madison Ave.. N.Y. 22 • PI a/a I -.W0 



IK-TV WITI-TV WAOA-TV W8PO-TV WJW-TV 

troil Milwaukee Atlanta Toledo Cl.-vel.nd 



30 



sI'ONSOIt 



25 ai'wil 1959 



SPONSOR 



APRIL 1959 



low media men 
i build prestige 
i in top agencies 



v? Merchandise your media department, say 
executives at Y&R. Comptou, OB>I and others 

\W New promotion tactics aimed to increase 
Mature among clients and agency's own staff 



'\Jne of the most startling, significant bul least discussed 
ianges in agencies toda\ i> the sharp increase in "sales 
hromotion" efforts 1>\ agency departments, particularl) 
■nedia. 

Time was. in the average agency, when most media 
men were little more than slaves and statisticians for the 
account uroiij). 

Now. however, thanks larger) to the growing com- 
plexity of air media buying, media is emerging as a full- 
fledged senior partner in agenc) operations. \nd. as 
this has happened, more and more media department 
heads are actively "selling" their activities to both clients 
and agenc) personnel through a varietj of promotion 
[techniques. 

This week SPONSOR talked with media higher-ups al 
-a number of Top 20 agencies. The) outlined some "I 
the ways their media colleagues are promoting themselves 
and their -talis . . . and win they're doing it. 

Sam Frey, media director at Ogilvy, Benson \ Mather, 




MEDIA PROMOTION within the agency stresses 
two-way account-media plans sessions, as on Esso 
(N. J.) at Ogilvy, Benson & Mather. (L to r): Ann 
Janowicz, med. sup.; Gil Lea, v.p.-acct. supvr.; Sam 
Frey. med. dir. Goal: improve communications, results 



SPONSOR 



25 upril L959 



31 




Hjjin Beeo«a«> 



tation. - W«r »m ■ • 



M^il. ■Mllllll *!&*■— ' " SpW! 



Ulo l>«!«-»4» ,, • 









itXT ln 



,rf«« tf " 



-. H» •*!?' SS 



This i# 4 to ** 



POCKET 

PIECE 

* 
Compton Advertising, Inc. 

Mi Ma/izm Amur, Sn York 11, K Y. 

* 

Barton A. CufHmtnf* 

nmtmsr 

Frank B. Kemp 



Zt U r n 

the ;? Tor , 



jj, forW pc * &C inA*erraminjtbc-9VOTWA»w« 

__-<£ of ?* T g-r e* * 1 * om modi* element*. Tile eoit«i» 

. * . SmO*" ^- it* tw * ! «** »wiW* arinim. For 

Uliif^thaiii* * .-.». is t rof iptcMc <*jsnp»i0*. cow* 



# ^c. fori 3 ** 106 rt«wrn*niflf«*^rt«*mi« 

__-<£ of ?* T g-r e* * 1 * Oi»inedi»elem*ntt. Tins cows Awaut 

.* . SmO*" ^- it* tw * ! «** »wiW* «H»iM«. ForMmu 

kIIi4' s *t>.oHit« ^ .-«» i* * Tat*pK&ai*p>kp*,tmw*y<Mr , 






PRINTED MATERIAL originating in Compton's media department backs up personal contact and memoes, both in and out of the agency 



savs much <>i the pressure lor an 
upgraded media stafl has come from 
clients. "The move to enhance media 
units has come from two sources, 
however - the clients and agency 
management. Packaged goods and 
broadly distributed consumer prod- 
ucts are demanding the hest of every- 
thing in all departments. They want 
intra-department cooperation in the 
agency as well as a synthesis of all 
departmental knowledge so they get 
the most from the brains available." 

But in his opinion this takes agen- 
cy media managers with a long view 
and an over-all cohesive agency 
philosophy. " \ml il lakes a media 
executive who is willing to he firm 
in his convictions." >;n> Mr. I'rcv. 

Frank Kemp. v. p. and media di- 

rector of Compton Advertising, has 
a formalized plan for Informing other 
tgenc) people and Compton clients 
about what his Malf can and docs 
do. lie supei \ Nc- compilation and 



circulation of five major printed 
pieces designed to bring media closer 
to other operational units. 

1. The annual Media Review 
"highlights recent trends and devel- 
opments in the media field and illus- 
trates the relative sizes, costs and 
efficiencies of the various media 
commonlj used." Il cautions the 
account group people using (he Re- 
view to refer to il as background in- 
formation onlj and not use it "for 
media planning without the advice of 
your media buyer." Its recommended 
use: as a reference work for answer- 
ing client questions in meetings. The 
38-page review includes 12 pages on 
lv and radio, three each on maga- 
zines, supplements, newspapers and 
outdoor. 

2. The review has been trans- 
posed to presentation form for show- 
ing to account groups al their own 
requesl during the year. It's especial- 

l\ useful for people new to account 



work or to the agencj itself. 

3. A mimeod bulletin, "Account 
Section Media Department Proce- 
dures." outlines how the two divisions 
mesh on account planning. Media 
recommendations concern major 
plans, of a generalized nature, and 
specific recommendations. The out- 
line attempts to chart a procedural 
path which all agencv divisions — the 
media and account sections, copy, 
research, art, merchandising, etc. 
can follow in solving a clients prob- 
lem. 

4. The Media Pocket Piece, issued 
to account people over the past vcar. 
gives approximate costs of various 
media elements. Again, it carries the 
caution to consult the assigned asso- 
ciate media director for actual costs 
for specific campaigns. It includes 
costing on network and spot tv and 
radio and the print media. 

5. \ Glossary of Media Terms is 

24 pages long, (overs all-media 



32 



sI'IINSOK 



2.") m'kii. L959 



terminology as well ;»- -nine specifics 
inherent to each major medium. Ex- 
ample. Affidavit sworn prool <>f 

performance accompanying stations 
bill to agenc) showing bj « la\ 1 1 u • 
time of each announcement. 

Kui Compton, in common with 
■her major agencies, also shores 
u|> the media Function with less 
formal methods. Il lias set up a 
India committee, comprised ol 

account and media executives who 
are rotated from lime to time. Their 
task : to outline what llie\ can and 
should do to help each other. Staf- 
lei> from both sections give client 

presentations and the h\e associate 
media directors know all media. 

Progressive agencies are eternallv 
concerned with bettering communi- 
cations within their shops. Another 
wa\ they're getting the most out of 
their talent is to insist on more 
responsibility while giving the corre- 
sponding authority. There's a trend 
a\\a\ From the "one-man" media de- 
partment concept and a Fostering of 
a "stron<i team" image. 

Media people below the director's 
level are being permitted to put their 
■est foot forward and. in so doing, 
to put the agency's best foot forward. 
too. As buyers have switched to all 
media from specialized ones in man) 
agencies, they, too. have broadened 
their scope and their usefulness in 
contributing ideas and answers to 
total marketing and sales problems 
rather than exclusively to media bins. 

One of the most vocal "salesmen 
of a media department is fining & 
kbicam's William K. Matthews, rice 
president and director of media rela- 
tions and planning. He has taken 
dozens of measures to integrate his 
department with all others and to 
get the most out of the brains around 
him. Y&R, with the product group 
system, has a structure which lends 
Kself to integration. Ever) account 
ha- assigned representatives from all 
departments so that am plans session 
of an) kind general or specific — 
has a media expert sitting in. 

^ &R balances external "promo- 
tion" of the media department with 
"internal."' Among the externals: 
Mr. Matthews recentlv conducted a 
press conference on triple spotting 
in television. He gives frequent 
speeches before media groups and 
client sales forces as well as presen- 
tations to clients. He and his associ- 



ate directors travel to the agenc) - 
branch offices to spread the word 

about media developments and s\-. 

terns. I he agenc) ha-- had two open 
houses for executive and sales per- 
sonnel from its publishing accounts. 
Internally, ^VH> media relations 
department circulates a barrage ol 

media material which backgrounds 
and briefs everyone in the agenc) 
on both genera] and special informa- 
tion. \ monthl) bulletin. Media 

Miscellany, goes on ;l speciall) printed 

letterhead throughout the agenc) and 
to clients. It includes current news 
items. 

Vinous ^ &R's manv internal media 
merchandising dev ices: 

• \n annual media review, which 
is circularized in loose-leal book 
form so sections can be omitted or 
revised and therein tailored for a 
specific client. 

• Continuing review of research, 
as it relates to media, which mav be 
conducted by other agenc) depart- 
ments. Staffers submit material - 
often extracted from client recom- 
mendations — to the media unit which 
then edits the material, generalizes it 
and distributes it to interested par- 
ties. Among surveys of this kind: the 
New ^ ork Italian Market. Pocket 



Book \dvei lisinu Network I \ . tin- 
New ^oik Newspapei Situation. 

• Publii aiion oi the I » .iln.ii ion 
and I ge ol Advertising Media, with 
t In- , tli edition now in preparation. 

• Allocation oi one spei ialil ) to 
each associate media directoi I though 

the) are COnvei sanl w ilh all media i . 

bach is then responsible, -,i\- Pete 
Matthews, foi "being alerl to new- in 

that given medium and passing il 

along usuall) in memo form; being 

aware id and working with the bu) - 

ing stall in the development ol studies 

and information from a specifii 

medium, and knowing what's being 

done in it and what new develop- 
ments are: supervising (he prepara- 
tion of 1 ks. (hailed or slide ma- 
terial on the media situation foi 

presentation to agency and client 

people. ' 

• Compilation of special reports 
such as the Evaluation of Spot and 
Minute Mo\ ies. Telephone Directoi \ 
Advertising, I'm-mess Publications. 
1 hese printed pieces — as in the case 
with all material gains maximum 
circulation as soon as the report is 
completed. 

An increasing number of agencies. 
including ^\H. are conducting all- 
i Please turn to page 7(> i 




SPONSOR 



2.i aprii. L959 



SPEECHES AND OUTSIDE CONTACT project both media department and agency image. 
as is case with Y&R's Pete Matthews' presentation before members of an outside sales staff 



33 



CASE HISTORY 



Tv bowling rolls « 
up big appliance, 
auto, insurance 
sales — cheaply 

^ Three case histories prove family appeal 
of growing sport can move merchandise, sell 
intangibles; promotional slants add impact 




HHHi 




MERCHANDISING is big plus in bowling 
shows. Champ Steve Nagy (r) helps sports- 
caster Steve Shepard boost appliance sales 



Ei\rii though the "official" end of 
the howling season is now at hand, 
you'll barehj notice it so far as tv is 
concerned. Right through the sum- 
mer the pins will he flying for a 
combination of reasons — many of 
them commercial: 

• To begin with, the advent of 
air-conditioned alleys now makes the 
sporl just about a year-round prop- 
osition these days. 

• Next, interest in bowling which 
is mainlj an amateur's game has 
been growing, both among partici- 
pants and among t\ viewers. The 
latter, importantly, show an almost 
equal male-female split. 

• l>\ the same token, sponsorship 
of (\ pickups has been growing. Pro- 
motional tie-in opportunities and au- 
dience participation are hij: lures. 

• So is the week-to-week suspense, 
u nich contributes continuity . 

• \nd. il the prospective sponsor 
can I find a hand\ live show, lie can 



get syndicated howling film in plenti 
ful suppl) . 

• Finally, it's a comparatively in 
expensive kind of action programing 

There are about 20 live bowling 
shows in the country, with the majoi 
concentration in Midwest and Kasll 
Central regions, plus a sizable] 
sprinkling in the East and Southwest 
Advertisers cover a broad range oil 
products larger) because of the inter 
est women show in the sport. 

So it's not surprising that an ap 
pliance dealer, an insurance coin 
pany, and a ear dealer can find in 
bowling show the ideal vehicle t« 
merchandise their wares. This is tht 
current situation in Omaha when 
this combination holds forth on ar 
hour-long show called Bonus lioulini 

Sunda) nights on KMTV. iTln 
fourth quarter-hour is presentlj sole 
to Texise on a national spot basis) 
For Norman Gendler, manager si 

l>e-t Appliance Co., it's the end ol 



;i 



Nl'OXSOU 



2."i vi-Kit. 1955 



Ijpng road to hml ;i consistent volume 
guilder. "We've tried ever) possible 
approach to using commercial tele- 
vision, but bowling has given us a 
more consistent response than any- 
thing we tried before," he saj s. 

Here's how Best use- the bowling 
show for lii^ liner Omaha outlets: 

i I i iudience participation. The 
identification of the viewer with the 
howler lead- in a logical gimmick: 
Put the bowler to work for the viewer. 
Specifically, KMT\ has worked out 
a viewer registration plan. The viewer 
lilU out a rani m hich he can obtain 
onl\ at ihf place of business of one 
B the three sponsors. Here's how tlii- 
Eraffic builder pays off for the home 
Audience: When a I >■ »\\ l<-i gets a tur- 
ke\ i three >ti 'ikes in a row i one 
lome-viewer registration is drawn. 
If ilif bowler gets his fourth strike. 
Be wins $5 and s<> tines the viewer. 
In one week. 2,000 registration cards 
were picked up from the three spon- 
snrs. The Best Appliance Co. dis- 
pensed 721 of these; Service Life ln- 
nrance Co., 906; Hulac Chevrolet, 
573. 

(2) Modest prizes. The pavout is 
imt a large item on a bowling show 
until it gets into the ultra-skill cate- 
gory. The winner of each game gets 
•S2"). There's an RC \ color l\ set >it- 

big around at Best Appliance for the 
bowler ol a 700 series or a 2(>.~> game. 
For 20-weeks. it sat around safelj 
enough. Then one Sundaj night two 
bowlers hit the score in the same 
name. The insurance sponsor mean- 
time put up a tropin. And Hulac 
Chevrolet has an Impala standing 
around in similar jeopard) for a '>l*0 
tame. Twin Cit) Bowl in Council 
BlufTs. where the program originates, 
put- up cash prizes for 300 games. 

(3) Commercials. Store manager 
Bendler does the commercials him- 
self. No "bowling specials" as such 
are offered, hut there are plent) of 
Inducements to get people to the store 
— personal appearances by top howl- 
ers I see photo I. the viewer registra- 
tion scheme. Says Gendler, "We de- 
vote one minute of our commercial 
time to t\ set sales, the same to W liiii- 
bool washers. We practicalh know 
in advance just what response we'll 
get to anv commercial. We sold 553 
tv sets, color and black-and-white 
combined in the first 2(> weeks of our 
current sponsorship. Our washer 

i Please turn to page 16 I 

SPONSOR • 2o APRIL 1959 



FACTS ON BOWLING'S TV STRIKE 

1. OVER-ALL DIMENSIONS: Bowling is approaching 

year-round status with the advent <>i air-conditioned alleys. 
Twenty-two million fans participate in the sporty says the 
tmerican Bowling Congress. Of these, around 1 ' ■_> milium 

ore registered with tBC 01 II IBC (3 million men. I 1 \ mil- 
lion women, pins a feu children i. The) roll on 83,000 lanes 
in 8.100 establishments, (bout 2.V , of the lanes are in the 

Northeast. 2 1' , m the East Central region, 29' , in West 
Central. 8* \ m the South, and L3 ( , m the Pacific area. 

2. TV AUDIENCE: There is an almost equal male-fe- 
male division in the tv bowling audience. This is evident in 
a November, 1958 Nielsen breakdown of the audience of 

IBC TVs Bowling Stars: 35^ male, 31^ female, L6 
teens, 1.8% children. Interestingly, a \ear earlier, the com- 
position was B2°/ t male. MY t women. By territory, Sielsen 
shows the same program with an average audience of 8.1 in 
the East Central region. 7.1 in the \ortheast. 6.1 in the 
II est Central. 5.0 in the Pacific area. 1.0 in the South. 

3. MAJOR TELECASTS AND SPONSORS: 

Howling Stars. ABC Tl . filmed, 26 weeks; sponsor: tmeri- 
can Machine & Foundry. Costs for 26 shows: time, 
$412,000; prod., $275,000. i "57 re-runs now in 8 markets i 
Championship Bowling, syndicated hour show, 176 markets. 
iverage program and time cost per market: $860. Typical 
sponsors: Beer (Carting. Genesee. Harnm): grooming aids 
(Lanolin Plus. I aseline ) : elec. sharers ( Norelco. Sunbeam ). 
Phillies Jackpot Bowling. NBC Tt . lire. Friday, (began 9 
January); sponsor: Bayuk Cigar Co.: cost per show: time, 
prod.: $4,000; prizes: $4,000. (Follows Gillette Fights). 
BPAA All-Star Finals, ABC TV. live, 18 January I annual i ; 
sponsor: AMF; total cost: $99,000. 

World's Invitational Match Game Bowling Champions. NBC 
Tl . lire. 12 December 1958 (annual); sponsors: Gillette. 
Brunswick-Balke-Collender; total cost: $110,000. 
\\ omen's Major League Bowling, NBC TV, filmed. 26 
weeks; sponsor: Brunswick {alt.). Prod.: $10,000 per shou . 

4. LOCAL PICTURE: Here are samples of how local. 

regional sponsors use tl holding shows and what they pat) : 
Live Bowling, WNBQ. Chicago, Saturday. Time costs: 
$2,250. production. $1,750. prizes: $500. Sponsors: Peter 
Hand Brewery ( Meister Bran ). Chicagoland Desoto Deal, ; s, 
Bowling Champions All-Star Tournament. If X) '/.-LI . De- 
troit. Saturday. Total: SI. 985 plus line charges to Saginaw, 
Grand Rapids. Lansing stations. Sponsor: Pjeifjer Brewing. 
Beat the Pro. KHJ-Tl . Los tngeles, Saturday. Time, pro- 
ductiini: S2.000. Prizes: SI. 700. Sponsor: Fiesta Travel. 
King Louie Bowling. WDAF-TV, Kansas City, Sunday. 

Total cost: $800. Participating sponsorship. 




ARE RADIO'S 

DAYTIME SERIALS 
REALLY TIRED? 



^ CBS Radio v.p. Hausman challenges admen, other 
nets and stations to forget old prejudices, look at facts 

^ Criticism of serials will win you quick applause, 
he says, hut the rating figures can make you a liar 



by Louis Hausman, V. P. 

CBS Radio 

If \ou're making a speech about 
programs to almost any group of 
radio station men these days, here 
are two guaranteed safe sentences 
with which to end your remarks: 

"In closing, I am confident that all 
of you recognize the urgent need for 
program change. And I am equally 
confident you will take forward and 
constructive steps to reorganize your 
programing so that radios unique 
capacity to serve the public will keep 
step with our atomic age. " 

Just take a strong stand in favor 
of change I it's like being against sin 
and the man-eating shark I and you'll 
leave your audience to the sound of 
applause. 

Such sentiments are particular!) 
safe if you're talking about daytime 
radio serials, because they reflect 
almost exactly what broadcasters 
themselves have been sa\ ing for 
almost 20 years. 

These programs have generated a 
whole folk lore in the radio industry. 
rhey're commonly described as 
"tired,' old-fashioned." and "audi- 
ence Losers . Gel rid of them and 
radio men applaud \ou. keep [hem 
on. and \ ou're labeled "backward." 
unimaginative" and "horse-and- 
buggy." 

Mill before j iimjiing on llii> |»>|ui- 

lar bandwagon in favor <d change, 
most nl ii- would do well to lake a 
\\mi\ lonk at the performances >>l 
these daytime shows, particular!) in 
relation to other programing. 



Perhaps a change is indicated. Mut 
maybe the thing to change is radio 
men's opinions, not the programs 
themselves. 

Daytime serials have never been 
very popular with the rank and file 
of station operators. Why should 
they be? Broadcasters don't listen to 
them. Even if they did. they wouldn't 
like them. A station manager can't 
point to them with pride or discuss 
them with his friends at the Adver- 



tising or Sales Executives Club. And 
he probably has trouble selling avail- 
abilities in them to local businessmen 
who consider serials much as he does. 

Nobody has ever liked daytime 
serials except the housewives and the 
hard-boiled national advertisers. 

Recently another network, con- 
jecturally in response to affiliate pres- 
sures, got rid of its afternoon serials. 
And then rationalized the move in a 
press release saying, "The complete 



HOW SEVEN CBS DAYTIME SERIALS 



HELEN TRENT 



STATIONS 



BOSTON 

10 STATIONS REPORTED 



CHICAGO 

9 STATIONS REPORTED 



LOS ANGELES 

13 STATIONS REPORTED 



NEW YORK 

12 STATIONS REPORTED 



PHILADELPHIA 

10 STATIONS REPORTED 



ST. LOUIS 

STATIONS REPORTED 



SAN FRANCISCO 

10 STATIONS REPORTED 



Each rectangle represents <i station individually reported 

301 a< I I .it. -i PI i.si; i ih reports |Ju I • b m Wan li 



COUPLE 
NEXT DOOR 





;,, 



Sl'ONSOH 



25 IPRIL 1959 



mixln 'ii stor) on radio, well-produced, 
with a casl of Btars, has proved to 
move great appeal to younger house- 
wives." i italics supplied i 

The onl) trouble with this state- 
pent is thai ii j ii — t isn't so. 

The 55-minute program which that 
Network is keeping and which it is 
backing up with another, similar in 
formal, appeals to older people. Only 
some (>' i of its total audience is in 

ihc 18 to 34-year-old age category. 
To match I . S. housewife distribution 
this figure should be 18%. 

And serials'. - ' The seven daytime 
serials in the CBS Radio Network 
schedule came out with an average of 
18%, exactly paralleling the distribu- 
tion of I . S. housewives. And the 
CBS Radio daytime serials had onl) 
1.59? of their audience in families 
with "no housewife", compared with 
a I . S. average of L8.5' < . 

It reallv is a shame to have opinion 
clouded l>\ facts, isn't it? 

It is no breach of confidence to 
report that network-affiliate relations 
in recent years have been something 
less than ideal. The growth of tele- 
\ision. the trebling of the number of 
existing stations since the end of the 
war. all have contributed to smaller 
audiences for the average station. 



The mere lad that, b) and large, -la- 

tion profits have been good; that ad- 
vertisers have been availing them- 
selves ol radio's extraordinarj values 
is frequentl) brushed aside. \nd the 

network is the fall ,lmi\ . 

\ network, to justif) it- existence, 
recognizes thai it musl suppl) its 
affiliates with programs which have 
two main functions. The firsl thing 
the network programs must give to 
the affiliate is a ""sound" which dif- 
ferentiates it from the average inde- 
pendent station. \nd the second re- 
quirement is thai the network pro- 
grams must be audience builders 
must hold audiences for the affiliate. 
Network programs have to compete 
successfully for audiences with other 
network programs and those of the 
independent stations. 

The question of sound is terribl) 
important. Because if the network 
affiliate can't sound different from its 
independent competition it might as 
well go independent. Once a station 
owner makes this decision he lias, of 
course, the questionable privilege of 
going out and competing with long- 
established indies in his market. 

No one can quarrel with the fact 
that serials give this "sound differ- 
ence" to the affiliate carrying them. 



"Bui it's the wrong Bound, you will 
hear a lol of affiliates -av. linn the) 

gO on to -av. "Nobodv li-lcn- to the 

da) time sei ials an) mot e. I he d.j. b 

On the independent- an- beating hell 

out of 11- w hen we carr) the sei ials. 1 
I his i- di-iui bing, il ti ue. Vgain, 
it just doesn 1 happen to be bo. 

H\ and large, the daytime serials 
do better against the independent 
competition than almost anj other 
dement of the average affiliate's 

schedule. You can count on the fin- 
gers of a three-toed sloth the cases 
where an affiliate's own local pro- 
graming doe- belter, in relation to 

competition, than do daytime serials. 

Below are the mOSl recent l'ul-e 
reports for seven major I . S. mar- 
kets. These are the markets in which 
CBS Radio operates a station: Boston. 
Chicago, Los Angeles, New \ ork. 
Philadelphia, St. Louis, and San 
Francisco. 

Obviously, we at CBS Radio have 
a special interest in these markets. 
But just as obviousl) these markets 
represent the toughest communities 
in this countrv for an) programing. 

All of these are major markets 
where, theoretically, tastes should be 
( Article continued next page 1 



RANK AGAINST COMPETITION IN SEVEN MAJOR MARKETS 



HISPERING 
STREETS 



MA PERKINS 



YOUNG 
DR. MALONE 



SECOND 
MRS. BURTON 



RIGHT TO 
HAPPINESS 






I I 
II 





Rank of daytime serial programs in time period 



SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



37 



more sophisticated than in smaller 
communities. The CBS Radio sta- 
tions in them compete with any- 
where from 15 t<> 20 stations to as 
main as 36 stations in New \ork. 
And the competition to the CBS 
Radio stations is plent) rugged. It 
includes other network and good 
music stations. And, toughest of all, 
these are markets in which the oldest, 
hest-estahlished and smartest-run in- 
dependent stations operate stations 
such as WHDH, WNEW, WIND. 

So it certainl) isn't doing serials 
any favor to look at their perform- 
ances in these markets. Let's see how 
the serials do in these seven markets. 

The chart on pages 36 and 37 
shows the seven 10 and 15-minute 
daytime serials and the markets in 
which a CBS Radio station carries 
them. It shows, also, the number of 
stations with enough measured listen- 



ing to be reported in the Pulse report 
for each of these cities. 

If daytime serials were first in 
every instance, you would have a 
total of 49 firsts. Well. \ou don't 
have 49 firsts. You have only 34 firsts 
of ties for first out of a possible 19, 10 
seconds, and the rest third or fourth. 

This is the box score for "in-home" 
listening to the daytime serials. The 
"in-home" listeners are the logical 
customers, both for the serials and 
the products advertised. But, interest- 
ing!) enough, the serials do almost as 
well ivhen you throw in the bonus of 
"out■of■home ,, listening. Their rank. 
on a total-audience basis — against the 
competition of 10 to 30 stations — is 
consistently high. 

On a nation-wide basis the radio 
networks have certainly gone in for 
their share of experimenting. The 
(Please turn to page 46) 



RANKING OF NET RADIO PROGRAMS 

NATIONAL NIELSEN-RATINGS 

Top 25 regularly-scheduled sponsored network radio program} 
Rank based on highest program segment or program unit* 

First report for March, 1959 

Nielsen total in-home audience 

Homes 

Rank Program 000 

1 Whispering Streets (1st wk, MTWF; 2d wk, TWF) 1.385 

2 News (M-F 2:00-2:05 p.m.) 1,236 

3 Ma Perkins _ _ 1.187 

4 News (jM-F 10:10:05 a.m.) _ 1,187 

5 Right To Happiness (wkl F) 1.187 

6 Young Dr. Malone _ _ 1,137 

7 Allan Jackson (Sat., 10-10:05 a.m.) _ _ 1.137 

8 My True Story (10:05-10:15 a.m.; 1st wk, TWThF; 2d «k. 

M-F) _ _ 1 . 1 3 7 

9 House Party (10:15-10:30 a.m.; MWThF) 1.088 

10 Metropolitan Opera 1,088 

11 Second Mrs. Burton _ _ 1,038 

12 Monitor (10:05-10:15 a.m.; 1st wk, M) 1,038 

13 News (M-F 10:00-10:05 a.m.) _ 1,038 

14 Suspense (Sun., 5:30-5:45 p.m.; 2d wk) _ 1,038 

15 Arthur Godfrey (9:50-10 a.m.; 1st wk, F) 1,038 

16 Ernie Kovacs (Sat., 8:45-8:50 p.m.) _ 1,038 

17 Romance Of Helen Trent 989 

18 Robert Trout (Sun., 10-10:05 a.m.) _ 989 

19 Rusty Draper _ _ - - 989 

20 News (M-F 11-11:05 a.m.) _ 940 

21 Couple Next Door _ _ 940 

22 Johnny Dollar (Sun., 5:205:25 p.m.; 2d wk) 940 

23 It. -hert Trout (Sun., 11-11 :05 a.m.) 940 

24 News (M-F 11-11:05 a.m.) _ 940 

25 (ialen Drake (10:30-10:45 a.m.; 1st wk, MTWTh; 2d wk, 

MTTh _ 841 

* Individual krgmniii. of ttgmenlnl prognmi counted only ones 



If you're 

^ Here's Campbell-Ewald's 
diary of a tv spot music track 
— how lonjr audio takes to do, 
what the production costs are 



F^ big, new creative vogue now 
flowering in t\ is the use of special 
music. Productions ranging from 10- 
second commercials to full-hour pro- 
grams now boast of original compo- 
sitions and recordings rivaling Holly- 
wood's best. 

How complicated is the new trend? 

To give you an idea. SPONSOR has 
examined the day-by-day time and 
cost problems that arise in a typical 
music production situation — the one- 
minute film commercial. Here s the 
lineup: 

Client: Advertising Council for Na- 
tional Safety Council 

Agency: Campbell-Ewald 

Assignment : Sound tracks for a se- 
ries of four spots 

Budget: $3,500 for the audio 

There are four phases to music 
production: ill creative planning, 
(2 I original composition. (3) orches- 
tration, and (4) recording. The 
whole process takes a week to 10 
days. 

In this case. Campbell-Ewald writ- 
er-producer Pete Miranda and agency 
musical director Andy Doyle started 
off with a planning session with Jim 
Ellis, president of Plandome Produc- 
tions, and his music director. Sammy 
Spear. It took two days to screen 
films already produced, and to form 
a strateg\ based on the communica- 
tion image to be achieved, the audi- 
ence target to be reached, the points 
needing musical accent, and lastly, 
how the budget would be distributed. 

Next, Sanum Spear tackled the 
actual job of composing the music 
needed to get across the pre-deter- 
mined sales strategy. This step, the 
actual composition, varies from a 
da) to a week. Before the recording 
session, an arranger transposes the 
musical score on large sheets, then a 
copyist transcribes the individual 
parts each musician will use. Scoring 
costs depend greatl) on musical tem- 



.;," 



sI'ONSOK 



25 wim. 1059 



producing a musical commercial 




SUPERVISING sound recording are Andy Doyle, center, Campbell-Ewa Id music director, and Jim Ellis, left, president of Plandome Productions 



po; the basic rate runs between S3. |.i 
and $5.17 a page — with pages defined 
In AI'M local 802 as four measures 
each. Depending <>n tempo, a score 
page usually covers between 3.5 and 
10 seconds of air time. 

The recording session is usually 
scheduled for two hours, with pro- 
duction being of two kinds. The rel- 
ativel) fixed expenses are for the stu- 
dio itself, which costs from $35 to 
${>() an hour, including the studio 
engineer, and for recording tape, 
which is $20 for a 2, 1 00- foot reel, but 
with special effects (such as triple- 
track tape or multiple channels) ad- 
ditional. The variable e\pen>es in 
musical production are principally on 
ihe talent side the number of per- 
formers used, the union to which the) 
belong, and the nature of the spot 
schedule. 

rhese were the particular rates in 
Plandome's budget: under V.FTRA 
rates, a voice group of three to five 
singers were paid Sl."> each per an- 
nouncement, plus sT.20 for each hour 



of rehearsal: soloists get *72 fm each 
transcription. I nder S \.G rates, an- 
nouncers i between two and four! are 
paid $67.50 each per announcement 
for 13 weeks use on a triple- \ spot. 

Musicians presently gel this scale: 
$27 the first hour and $4.50 per sub- 
sequent quarter-hour. I p to three 
minutes of music, or time announce- 
ments for one sponsor, ma\ be com- 
pleted during the first hour. Double 
rates applv to the conductor and the 
contractor; however, the conductor 
can act as contractor, a permissable 
economy . 

The entire bookkeeping responsi- 
bility keeping track of all union re- 
quirements, payroll deductions, and 
other details i> on the shoulders ol 
the music producer, leaving the agen- 
cy free to concentrate on creative 
areas. 

Synchronization of picture and 
>oiind is a kev factor, of course. In 
this case, a live-action film -hot by 
Morton McConnachie was produced 
first. Therefore a crucial phase of the 



production process was for Jim Ellis 
and Samtnv Spear to spend an entire 
dav at the movieola, viewing the film 
print and coordinating a musical 
script that correctly matched footage 
((Hints, created the right mood and 
delivered effective accents and all in 
exactlv the right places. Mosl impor- 
tant i- providing bridges in the com- 
mercial copv thai have corred breaks 
[or music. 

The initial plans session, which 

Usually lake- from one to live hour-. 

i- helped greatly it the agency copy- 
writer can attend along with those 
whose responsibility is the music. 

Ihe second planning talk i- con- 
cerned with strictly musical prob- 



I, 



Agreement here will naturalh 



bring the whole creative problem into 
Focus more smoothly . 

\\ lien it conic- to picking the in- 
struments, keep this in mind about 
Strings: Individual violins don't car- 
ry . Heine, il -tl ingS .lie ll-ed at all. 

groups are necessary and ihe per- 
forming group inii-t he large. ^ 



SPONSOR 



'2i vi'KiL 1950 



39 



Why Hallmark tv builds sales of 



^ Greeting card sponsor disproves 'mass appeal' 
theories with highest quality programs, soft sell copy 

^ 10-year sales rise of low-cost seasonal items traced 
to Hall of Fame and FC&B's 700 artistic commercials 




TIE-IN: Counter display on upcoming Hall of Fame studied by FC&B team ( I to r) John 
Rand, copy supervisor; Homer Heck, v. p. tv radio; Goodwin Alarilc, v. p. acct. supervisor 



#%mong the flood of fan letters that 
follows every Hallmark Hall oj Fame 
there invariably are some written on 
Hallmark cards and the sender writes, 
"See, I've cared enough to send the 
very best." That this will be re- 
peated after 28 April when Hallmark 
presents its last special of the season, 
Ah, Wilderness, on NBC TV almost 
goes without saying. 

Not every tv advertiser enjoys the 
unique advantage of turning out a 
product that can be fired back as a 
congratulation, but then there is a 
lot that is unique about Hallmark — 
especiallv the way it uses 90 minutes 
of tv time about a half dozen times 
a year to sell a line of products rang- 
ing in price from 10(* to about a 
dollar. That such low-cost items sell 
in sufficient quantity to gross for 
Hallmark an estimated $80 million 
annually as a return on an advertis- 
ing budget of about $3 million I of 
which all but about $*/> million is in 
tv) is further evidence of Hallmark 
sagacity. 

Behind the Hallmark operation is 
67-year-old Joyce Hall who laid the 
Hallmark groundwork back in 1910 
with a post card jobber shop in Kan- 
sas City and who now controls the 
whole empire. It is Halls okay that 
is needed on everything and his own 
fine taste that is reflected in every- 
thing from the most inexpensive 
greeting card design to a $350,000 
tv spectacular. Quality is indeed the 
Hallmark hallmark. 

Guardian of this quality on the ad- 
vertising scene is Foote. Cone & Beld- 
ing which has been the agencj for 
Hallmark Cards. Inc. for 16 years 
from the da\s when the compan) was 
still known as Hall Bros. In ihe past 
eight years, this Chicago agency has 
heen responsible for cop\ and pro- 
duction of some 700 t\ commercials 
for Hallmark — all entertaining, all 
soft sell, and all in impeccable taste. 

While the Hallmark shows on NBC 
TV have heen gathering accolades 
from the critics and public, the com- 
mercials within the shows have heen 



1(1 



SPONSOR 



25 april 1959 



$80 million 



coming in for their own share <>f 
praise. Much of the Fan mail received 
after Hull <>) Fame productions spe- 
cificall) applauds the commercials. 

Paul Molli>\. t\ critic of the Chicago 

Sun Times devoted almost an cut in' 

column to the Hallmark commercials, 
Baying, ". . . there is a gentle artistr) 
about these advertisements: The) 
make an impression without intrud- 
ing into tlu* program." 

These commercials are the creation 

of a trio of Chicago FC&B executives: 
John B. Hand, cop) supervisor; 
Homer Heck, vice president in charge 

of t\ and radio: Goodwin \larik. 
account supen isor. 

John Hand is a native Chicagoan, 
a World War II Arm) Captain who. 
before going overseas, wrote, directed 
and emceed the I .S. Bond show. He 
came to FC&B 12 years ago. has been 
on the Hallmark account for eight. 
Besides w riling all the Hallmark com- 
mercials, he also has written com- 
mercials for Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, 
Bob Hope. Playhouse 90, Perry Como 
and Arthur Godfrey. In writing the 
Hull oj Fame commercials, Rand fol- 
lows the thinking of Hallmark presi- 
dent Joyce Hall who sums up his 
own \iew in these words: "I want 
the commercials to be as entertain- 
ing as the show. I'm opposed to the 
"hard sell" because the people at home 
are our guests." 

Homer Heck is the man responsible 
for the production of the commer- 
cial-. Heck came to FC&B in 1953 
as broadcast supervisor, was largeK 
instrumental in developing the Hull 
of Fume series of distinguished spec- 
taculars. A graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Oklahoma. Heck directed his 
first radio show in Oklahoma in 1931, 
ran the whole radio gamut through 
writer, director, announcer, actor, 
program manager and station general 
manager. He went to NBC in Chi- 
cago in 1942, remained for 11 years 
b\ which time he had become pro- 
duction manager for both radio and 
tele\ ision. 

When the written commercial is 




AWARD WINNER: Green Pastures received such acclaim after first presentation in 1957 that 
it was repeated again this March. George Schaefer, producer-director, is shown here with cast 



finished. Heck take.- it to New York 
where he meets with his basic crew 
including the set and costume de- 
signers as well as NBC's Van Fox 
whom FC&B hires to direct the com- 
mercials. From this conference come 
layouts and design- that are sent on 

to FC&B in Chicago. After FC&B 

approves them, the) are then sent on 
to the new SB million Hallmark head- 
quarters in Kansas Cit\ for client 
approval. Then back the\ go to New 
^ ork for final revisions. 

Two days before the Hull of Fume 
show goes on the air. rehearsals for 
the commercials begin. To produce 
each commercial costs a SPONSOR- 
estimated $4,000 to $5,000. Each 
commercial is done "live" in New 
^ ork. Each one is different and is 
never repeated (reason: the same 
cards are never featured twice: card 
lines for even occasion change from 
year to year I . 

Hallmark manufactures some 11,- 
000 lines of cards and specialty items 



such as part) decorations, gift wraps, 

gift ribbon-. I be-e item- are dis- 
tributed directl) to -nine 18,000 re- 
tail dealers who sell enough of them 
to make Hallmark the largesl linn of 
its kind. I It i- believed to u I oss nene 
than the combined -ales <>f it- three 
nearest competitors Norcross. Hu-t 
Craft and Gibson, i 

So before a Hull of Fume show 
goes on the air. it i- necessar) that 
every one of these 18.000 retail stores 
be apprised of exactl) what cards or 
specialty items will be featured in 
the commercial-. \ specific can! 
shown on a Hallmark commercial can 
\irlualK create a run on the local 
dealer and it behoove- him to >ee that 
he has it in stock. Hallmark take- 
no chances. It notifies it- dealers 
twice. Before each l\ season begins, 
dealers are told the scheduled shows 
for that season and what classifica- 
tion of card- or part) favors will be 
promoted on each — Christmas. \ alen- 
tine, Easter, etc. (The upcoming _•'■ 



"LIVE" ONLY: Hallmark commercials are all "live" from NBC TV in New York. Sets often 
ade constructed to duplicate exactly a typical greeting card retail store such as is shown below 







SPONSOR 



25 april 1959 




-w 



\pril production of Ah, Wilderness, 
for example, will push cards for 
Mother's Day. Graduation and Fa- 
ther's Da\ i . 

The next notification to dealers 
conies as soon as the specific card 
line- have been selected for a com- 
mercial. Then Hallmark salesmen in 
each region call upon their dealers 
and -h<>\\ them the exact cards or 
items that will he pictured on tv. 
This is always done in plenty of time 
for dealers to order in the stock 
ahead of the telecast. Since Hall of 
lame went on the air in 1955. an in- 
teresting thing has happened in card 
-ales ratios: then 65% of cards sold 
were sentimental. 35% humorous — a 
trend that has been by now com- 
pletelj reversed. 

Hallmark commercial appeal is 
slanted toward women, since research 
has proved it is they who are the 
shoppers for gift wraps and greeting 
cards. One exception was the pre- 
Valentine show whose commercials 
showed men and boys at a card 
counter. Hallmark has found that the 
store traffic on the day following a 
Hall of Fame is tremendous with 
main of the shoppers actually re- 
membering the exact wording of the 
sentiment on the cards shown on tv. 



Thus the intensive planning and 
creation that goes into each Hallmark 
commercial does pay off. But this 
doesn't necessarily mean that every 
commercial goes exactly as planned. 

A notable exception occurred last 
Easter when Heck and Rand dreamed 
up a seasonal commercial requiring 
the services of two Easter bunnies. 
The two rabbits rehearsed well and 
everything looked rosy until just 
short l\ before show time. Then one 
of the rabbits, both of which had 
been presumed to be males, suddenly 
proved "litter-ally" otherwise and had 
to be dropped from the cast. The 
commercial went on with a single 
bunny. 

Hallmark is an old and savvy hand 
at air media. A recent article on the 
world's largest greeting card com- 
pany in Fortune stated. "Probably 
the biggest single factor in Hall- 
mark's rise was Hall's decision to 
promote his cards on the air. No 
publisher had ever done this before 
because of the general belief that 
people buy cards for their design and 
sentiment, not their brand name. Hall 
set out to prove this wrong. . ." 

The first venture into air adver- 
tising for Hallmark cards was in 
1936 on a Chicago station: the "per- 




SENTIMENTAL: Mother's Day 
cards will be featured in com- 
mercials on 28 April Hall of 
Fame drama, "Ah, Wilderness.'' 
Also featured will be a new 
line of greeting cards for Grad- 
uation Day and tor Father's 
Day. Top designers and verse 
writers turn out such cards 



SNAPPY: Another type of 
Mother's Day card — in contrast 
to the sentimental ones pic- 
tured above — are the "sophisti- 
cated" cards. For a long time 
Joyce Hall, whose business was 
built on "soft sentiment," 
shunned this relatively new type 
of "greeting," finally suc- 
cumbed to increasing demand 




sonality was radio philosopher Tony 
Wons. Wons would read the senti- 
ment from a greeting card, then ask 
his listeners to imagine they were 
turning the card over and looking at 
the trademark on the back. 

Said Fortune, "Soon dealers began 
noticing that shoppers were doing 
just that at the racks. 'It got worse 
after Hall went on TV,' one exasper- 
ated dealer recalls. "People were be- 
ginning to believe it wasn't a greet- 
ing card unless it had that crown'." 

From the Tony Wons Show, Hall- 
mark went on to use other radio 
shows — Radio Reader's Digest and 
radio's Hallmark Hall of Fame. With 
more than a decade of profitable air 
media experience behind it, Hall- 
mark was more than willing to accept 
t\ when it came along. (Today, the 
company looks forward eagerly to 
full saturation of color tv to display 
realistically their colorful line of 
products.) 

In 1951, the company explored tv 
with an interview series on CBS TV 
starring Sarah Churchill. At Christ- 
mas of that year, it sponsored the 
Gian-Carlo Menotti opera, Amah and 
The Night Visitors on NBC TV— a 
special so successful that it has been 
repeated regularly. 

The 1953-54 season found Hall- 
mark with three specials on NBC TV, 
among them Maurice Evans' per- 
formance of Hamlet. Meanwhile, the 
company had also been experiment- 
ing with half-hour and full hour tv 
dramas on Sunday afternoons, but 1>\ 
1955 came to the conclusion that the 
90-minute live special was its par- 
ticular cup of tea. 

In the first place, such specials 
timed to coincide with the seasonal 
peaks of greeting card or party fax or 
>ale> is the ideal marketing pattern. 
Secondly, the high quality of dra- 
matic entertainment packed into these 
90-minute formats deliver a smash 
impact on t\'s public, critics and on 
the Hallmark dealers, and product 
identity with Hall of Fame runs ex- 
tremely high. 

Hallmark and FC&B merchandise 
these //(/// of Fame specials with the 
same good taste thai permeates the 
entire Hallmark operation. Attractive 
counter displays, usually full color 
and three-dimensional announcing the 

upcoming show, go OUl to dealers. 

The elaborateness of these \ aries w ith 
importance of the card season. ^ 



42 



SI'OXSOK 



25 \i-kii. 1959 




MORE IDEAS FOR SPOT RADIO 

This article outlining a station representative s proposal 

for a new spot radio sales organization, is <>ne oi a series 

on new ideas for building np national spot radio volume. 
TtOO months ago. Sl'ONSOlfs si.\-pait .S.">( )().()()() I'lan I'm 
Spot Radio, stimulated much discussion, anil comment 
in the industry. The forming of a Single Rate \genc\ 
Committee, reported in SPONSOR, COSt nen liulit on a 
major spot radio problem. Last week, the marketing 
r. p. of a major advertiser made some provocative sug- 
gestions in a stinging article titled "The radio industl | 
needs a spanking." sponsor plans additional stories and 
articles designed to stimulate constructive thinking and 
action about national spot radio's future development. 



A $133,600 spot radio sales team 



^ Jack Masla, N. Y. r< 
sales agency to promote 



W 



by Jack Masla 

Pres. Jack Masla S: Co, Inc. 



hat spot radio needs now is a 
new sales concept — the formation of 
a new organization to sell national 
spot radio exclusively. 

There is toda\ no single group 
whose job is to sell spot radio, only 
spot radio and nothing but spot radio. 

RAB has been presenting radio's 
case. But RAB represents the entire 
radio medium — network, local, na- 
tional and spot. It cannot go to bat 
in recommending one form of radio 
over another. 

A growing number of representa- 
tives have been making presentations 
on spot radio. Hut most of these are 
confined to the top 50 markets and 
emphasize the areas in which the rep- 
resentatives stations arc located. 

SRA is undertaking a scries of 
luncheon presentations and trade- 
paper advertising to sell spot. But 
SRA is not equipped to devote its 
full time to the cause because of its 
numerous other functions. 

\ el every day. armies of top sales 
executives from newspaper associa- 



presentative, proposes new 
spot medium exclusively 



tions, networks. t\ and magazines are 
making presentations that are taking 
mone) awa\ from radio spot. What 
is spot doing to get this money back? 
For even full -page ad in news- 
papers for gasoline, radio stations 
lose 25 to 50 announcements. For 
everj radio network sale loo t<i 300 
-tat ions lose an average of about 



$100,000 iii national spol revenue. 

As thi- competition continues to 
toughen the onh answer for spot is 
the formation of a new spot agency 
to be called, perhaps NSR. and 
-tailed b\ top sales executives, pres- 
entation writers, research specialist-. 

The operations of NSR would be 
directed b\ it- president, a full-time 
salaried employee. He would report 
to the organization's board of direc- 
tors, a non-salaried group consisting 
of both radio station and representa- 
i /'lease turn to page IT i 



HOW A NEW SPOT RADIO AGENCY 
MIGHT DERIVE ITS INCOME 



First 25 markets 


60 stations @ $85 monthlv 


$61,200 year 




Next 25 markets 


40 stations @ $55 monthly 


$26,400 year 




All other markets 


50 stations @ $35 monthly 


$21,000 year 




Representatives 


30 @ various amounts 


$25,000 year 




Total .Membership 


Income 


$133,600 yearlj 




IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 







SPONSOR 



25 vi'iui. 1959 



13 




ORIGINALLY A FOOD FAD with special, limited appeal, yogurt is now aiming at mass consumer markets. Dannon Milk Products uses 100% 
spot radio for consistency and impact in its principal market (New York) and Developmental market (Philadelphia) to promote snack, dessert uses 

Radio gets yogurt out of fad class 



^ Consistent spot schedule gives Dannon 30% N. Y. sales 
increase, wide chain distrihution for Philadelphia dehut 



Juan Metzger, president of Dannon 
Milk Products (yogurt l. likes to put 
a focus on the marketing problems <>f 
liis unique product 1>\ talking to you 
this way: 

METZGER: When did \ on eat a 
frankfurter last? 

ANSWER: Maybe a week ago. 

METZGER: When did you eat one 
before that? 

ANSWER: Let's say three or four 
daj s. 

METZGER: In other words, you 
don I live on frankfurters, even 
though i r i< ■ \ re supposed i<> be a great 
American staple. That's our situa- 
tion, too onlj more so. Nol>od\ is 
going t" live on yogurt, though its 
fad days arc mostl) histor) now. 
• »ui problem is to get people to think 
of yogurt a> something as ordinary 
as a frankfurter, something dial's to 



be eaten fairly regularly, though not 
necessarily every day. and to get that 
message across cheaply. 

Dannon's latest effective solution is 
spot radio. 

Yogurt, in case the cartoons and 
comedians' jokes of a few years ago 
threw you off the track, is an ever) - 
da) food in Europe. (In Balkan coun- 
tries, peasants make yogurt merel\ 
l>\ letting bacteria in the air settle on 
milk. I Shortl) after the turn of the 
century, \ogurt was produced on a 
commercial basis in Kurope. Rut it 
wasn't until l ( D2 that Daniel Caras- 
so. son ol the foundei of the Danone 
Yogurt Co. in Paris (largest yogurt- 
maker in the world I. and Joe Metz- 
ger, a European industrialist, found- 
ed Dannon Milk Products Inc.. in 
Long bland Cit\. Its sales target: 

New York Citv. 



In the first years, sampling and 
demonstrations were all the $10,000 
promotional budget would allow. The 
following \ear. a combination of ra- 
dio and small newspaper ads was 
tried. "Radio did too good a job for 
us." sa\s Irwin Zlowe. president of 
the Zlowe Co., New York agency. "It 
provided too large a coverage area 
for our distribution at that time." 

So Dannon cut back to newspapers 
alone and continued in this medium 
until 1951. Meanwhile, a big step 
toward widening the appeal of the 
product was made b\ the addition of 
orange flavoring. To capitalize on it, 
Dannon began using tv as its sole 
medium in 1051. Moreover. 1>\ this 
time yogurt was starting to gel out of 
the purel) "kick" class into some- 
thing more soberl) accepted. 

From L951-57 the $100,000 budget 
limited Dannon to daytime and 
fringe time in spot t\. Special short- 
term campaigns in newspapers or 
radio supplemented the t\ bins pri- 

inariK lo eel that share of the market 



II 



si'onsoi; 



25 \n;ii. 1959 



which daytime t\ cannol reach. I he 
budget just could not sustain an ade- 
quate schedule in prime i\ time. So 
Dannon made an important decision: 
Consistenc) is what |>a\- off. \ml 
radio can deliver consistency cheap- 
ly. Radio and i\ were paired for a 
while in |o:>7. Then in L958, $250,- 
Ullll u a- allocated to radio alone. \ 

sales increase of 30 95 resulted. (Dan- 
non did a $3 million business in '58.) 

Last year also Dannon decided (o 

expand into the Philadelphia market 
(bucking four yogurts already in the 

market I. The original New York me- 
dia strategy (a combination ol radio 

and newspapers! was tried, but the 
results were mediocre. 

""So we decided to put all our eggs 

in one basket," sa\s Zlowe, "duplicat- 
ing the strategy that was paying off 
for us in New York: 100' < radio." 

Two months ago the concentrated 
radio campaign was kicked off. But 
it differed from the New York ver- 
sion in several wax s: 

Time slots in New ^ ork are care- 
full\ selected in and around news 
shows in morning and prime time 
and earl) evening (6 to 7 p.m.). But 
the target in Philadelphia was so gen- 
eral — and the housewife so vital to 
its success — that an across-the-board 
method was applied. Fiftj spots a 
week — all 60 seconds — were pur- 
1 1' lease turn to page 77 I 




JOE METZGER popularized yogurt in U.S.; 
his son Juan is now president of Dannon 

SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 




Photo r. .in, v o< Km \ 
ANCESTOR of KCBS, San Francisco, here is a 1913 photo of KQW, begun in San Jose by 
Charles Herrold (center) in 1909 and claimed to be first radio broadcasting station in world 



RADIO'S FIRST SPONSORS 

W Broadcasting success stories came early as food clients 
in San Jose moved into KQW program The Shopper's* Guide 



I o a handful of hroadcast veterans, 
the ahove picture may evoke mem- 
ories of a day when radio listeners 
tickled galena crystals with "cats 
whiskers." strained ears to hear 
through headphones. 

\s direct descendant of KQW I the 
station pictured i. KTBS. San Fran- 
cisco, this year celebrates 50 years of 
broadcasting. KQW was begun in 
100') b\ the late Charles 1). Herrold 
I a Stanford classmate of Herbert 
Hoover), was sold in 10 10 to CBS 
which moved its transmitter from San 
Jose to San Francisco and became 
KCBS. In the process, KCBS in- 
herited three "firsts"- fust broad- 
casting station in the world, first lad) 
disk jockey, first radio commercials 
for food and general products. 

The latter were aired in 1925 by 
Herrold who programed Shopper's 
(ritide. personallv delivered announce- 
ments for I 1 departments of San 
Jose's Central Market. 

Eight months later, all 1 I mer- 
chants were still with KQW I although 
thej had no contracts) and success 
stories were commonplace. Locis- 

cero's Fish Market in two hour- sold 

oxer 300 broilers one morning fol- 



lowing short radio announcements, a 
300' < increase o\er the same day the 
week before. Springer- Candy Store 
used a 100-word announcement daily 
over a period of 16 weeks featuring 
Imperial Candy. Apparent l\ the KQW 
signal was far-reaching; Springer 
heard from its Seattle distributor that 
sales were boosted in 20 cities as a 
direct result of the radio ads. 

Within another year. Herrold be- 
gan adding new clients such a- cloth- 
ing stores, restaurants and cafeterias, 
beauty parlors, mechanical services, 
real estate, hotel- and resorts, build- 
ing trade, dental and medical serv- 
ices. He w as a sharp merchandiser 
with an eye for tie-ins; studied the 
seasonal or holiday appeal of prod- 
ucts and tried to build campaigns <>n 
such appeals. 

Before starting Shopper's (>iti<lr. 
Herrold checked Commerce Dept. on 
legality ol using radio for ads, was 
advised there was no law against it 
but thej hoped he would be stopped. 

\- for the KCBS claim to the fir-t 

woman ili-k jockey, this was Her- 
rold's fir-t wife, who 1>\ 1913 was 
playing records over KQW on her 
Little Ham Program. ^ 



15 



BOWLING 

[Cont'd from page •>."> I 

business reflected a 2(V < gain during 

\\\\- same period. 

i I i Costs. Time costs for each 
complete show $565, remote costs, 
pro-rated over four weeks, are $235 
in i week (each local sponsor pays a 
quarter i . The howling center puts up 
the prize money ($125) in exchange 
for a closing courtesy announcement. 

(51 Merchandising. The station 
backs up its bowling show with a 
heaw on-the-air promotion schedule 
and announcements in other sports 
programs. Another plus: howlers in- 
variabh get into headlines during the 
week before their appearance. 

Ajon Farber, vice-president of 
Service Life Insurance Co., sees the 
bowling audience as "highly diversi- 
fied and congenial." He finds this 
type of viewer receptive to his firm's 
particular commercial approach. 

Over and over again, price proves 
to be an attractive feature of bowling 
shows. That they need not be expen- 
sive is further illustrated by WLA H- 
TV, Lebanon. Pa., which delivers an 
entire remote bowling telecast (in- 
cluding prizes) to a food advertiser 



for s.!()0. i It takes four men — two 
cameramen, an engineer, a sound- 
man — to do the show . i 

On the other hand, spectacular 
prizes naturally can hypo costs. For 
example, one of the latest howling 
sponsors, Fiesta Travel Agency, co- 
ops a brand-new Los Angeles bowling 
show. Beat the Pro, on KHJ-TV with 
nine bowling alleys, throwing in an 
eight-day trip to Acapulco costing 
$1,700 as weekly grand prize. Sam 
Molen's KMBC-TV, Kansas City, 
show gives a $250 diamond ring 
every week to the lady who makes a 
strike. Eleven Fords have also been 
awarded to date on the show. A 
Rochester furrier puts up a $1,000 
mink stole for a 300 game winner on 
WROC-TV's hour-long Star Bowling. 

Another sponsor to risk big money 
on prizes was National Food Stores 
when it was underwriting Fred Wolf's 
Live Boivling on W.\BQ, Chicago. 
They paid off twice on a $10,000 
prize for a 300 game. 

Lloyds of London used to insure 
against $100,000 payoffs for a 300 
game. However, the premium is now 
$200 a week and no one has taken 
out a policy lately. ^r 



DAYTIME SERIALS 

{Cont'd from j>age 3<> i 

t v\ i > other networks — both in the day- 
time and in the nighttime — have been 
peculiarly responsive to the plea 
"give u> something new and differ- 
ent". They have done everything 
from live programs with recorded 
music with personalities to 48 hours 
of non-stop weekend programing. 

As regular programing these efforts 
have not made a place for themselves 
in the li^-t of radio's most popular 
programs. From time to time a sports 
special such as a Robinson-Basilio 
fight or World Series broadcasts, a 
stereophonic television-radio simul- 
cast for a Perry Como or Lawrence 
Welk show does draw large audiences. 
But the chart on page 38 tells the real 
story. 

This same chart shows what radio 
audiences select on a nation-wide 
basis, according to the most recent 
Nielsen report. In the listing of the 
25 largest-audience programs in net- 
work radio, all seven of the CBS day- 
time serials are making a place for 
themselves. And all of them are at. 
or close to. the million-famih level. 

Someone is sure to point out that 




k 



I 



Selling tlie Scranton-Wilkes-Barre market 



.V"*' rfj 


m\ a '* 


.-»-* 




*8 


^B SYMBOL O' SEHVICE FT 


B 


-^ 


A TRA 


N 



* -^^" 



i .-<■- - 



1III1IIIHHIII I 
HBBI ii ■ 



»- » v < kJ 



CONTINENT STATION 



there are more radio sets-in-use in 
the daytime than in ilie evening. \nd 
that this is the reason for the lari:c 
absolute audiences to the serials. I his 
is certainl) true. However, the day- 
time >erial> shown in this chart arc 
competing against all other types of 
network programing. \nd. as a sec- 
ond point, the da\time serials con- 
sistently have about one-fifth of all 

the listening in their time periods. 
\nd thai is a preth pood record. 

None (d this suggests that daytime 
-trials can't he done better. \s a 
matter id fact, a number of them 
have been "modernized h\ bringing 
into the stories a greal main of 
todaj s situations. 

\\ hat kcc|is them so popular is a 
subject which has been treated length- 
il\ by researchers and sociologists. I 
certainl) don't intend to add to the 
literature on this subject. The fact 
remains that the) do well, and that 
the) are more popular than almost 
an) other single clement in a net- 
works schedule or in the schedule 
of most affiliates carrying them. 

If there is a moral to this piece it 
might be: Don't just do something, 
sit still! ^ 



MASLA 

i (<inl (/ ji am page 13) 

tives executive personnel, -elected 
from among NSR membei -. 

Initially, it would cost aboul $130,- 

(Kill a \ear to operate \SI!. with 
revenue coming from membei sta- 
tions and represental i\ es. 

Membership rates should be de- 
termined b) market size. Stations in 
the hr-t 2") markets should pa) ap- 
proximate!) $85 month!) not vei j 
much when jrou consider bow much 
an individual station can gain. Sta- 
tion in the next 25 market- could be 
billed at $55 nionthb. all others si") 
monthl) . 

For station representatives, rates 
should be determined b\ total yearly 
billing. I suggest that representatives 
doing over $5 million annually pa) 
$85 monthl\ for NSR membership. 
Those doing 82 to $5 million $55 
monthly, and those under $2 million 
$35 monthly. 

Vssuminji these rates, it would take 
only ISO stations and 30 representa- 
tives to get NSR rolling, i See box 
on page 13 for a breakdown of possi- 
ble income source- i 

\SI! offices original!) should be 



located in New \ oi k. but adilition.il 
regional offices could be opened .1- 
the organization expanded. 

NSR would work independent!) as 
well .1- in conjunction with repre 
sentatives and stations to take spot's 
-toi \ to advei tisera and agent ies. 
NSR w ould pi epare campaign re* - 
ommendations, suggest market line- 
up- best suited to client-. 1 ondui 1 
pi esentations -how in- the ad> antages 
oi 1 adio -pot ovei 1 ompetitive media 

in term- of cost, I 0\ <i age, impai I 

and success stories. 

I 01 example, w hich COStS more and 
reaches more home-, men and women 

a Full-page .id for .1 gasoline in a 

Raton |{oiii:e newspapei m '>."> to 50 

radio spots on two 01 more leading 
stations? Such competitive pitches 
would be a part of NSR's daily, 
52-week job. 

If national spol radio i- I n- 

tinue to prow, then L959 is the \ear 
of decision. 1959 i- the year for spot 
to take off it- kid gloves and slug it 
out with it- competitor-. 1959 could 
be the year when spot come- of ape 
with the formation of this new or- 
ganization NSR — National Spot Ra- 
dio. ^ 




PRIME SALES TARGETS are formed by people with dollars to spend. Covering 16 counties in Northeastern Pennsylvania. 
WNEP-TV blankets an area populated by 1.4 million people who control S2.1 billion of effective buying income... 
spend $1.3 billion in retail sales. 

Further, the combined metropolitan market of Scranton and Wilkes-Barre ranks as the third most important metro area in 
Pennsylvania. It's third in population. Third in effective buying income. Third in retail sales. And the combined 
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre market has a higher effective buying income per household than many other U. S. metropolitan 
areas of comparable or larger size. 

Transmitting at 1 million watts... from the tallest tower... on the lowest channel.. .WNEP-TV now provides 
better service to its viewers than any other station in the market. With a 70% power boost scheduled for Spring 
of 1959 and new studios in the Fall, WNEP-TV becomes the most powerful station with the most modern facilities 
in Northeastern Pennsylvania. 

For details on the best TV availabilities in this prime all-UHF market, call Avery-Knodel. 

ABC • CHANNEL 16 • SCRANTON-WILKES-BARRE 




WGR-TV. WGR. Buffalo. N.Y. • WROC-TV. Rochester, N.Y. . WNEP-TV, Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pa. • WSVA-TV, WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va. 



RADIO BASICS 



»/*PR.- 



MAY 



Facts & figures about radio today 

1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



Radio station index 



1959 



1958 



49.5 
radio 
homes 




48.7 
radio 
homes 



51.4 50.6 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

Source: A. C. Nielsen estimate, 1 Mar. each 
year, homes figures in millions. 









End 


of March 


1959 












Stations 


CPs not 


New station 


New 


station' 








on air 


on air 


requests 


bids 


in hearing 


Am 




1 


3.344 


1 123 


1 496 


1 


130 


Fm 






594 
End 


141 
of March 


I 49 

1958 


1 


24 


Am 




1 


3,229 


1 88 


1 418 


1 


115 


Fm 




1 


540 


72 


49 


1 


11 


Source : 


FCC 


monthly 


leports, commercial stations 


•February each 


year. 





Radio set index 



Radio set sales index 



Set 
location 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

Total 



1958 



1957 



95,400,000 90,000,000 
37,200,000 35,000,000 

10,000,000* 10,000,000 



142,600,000 135,000,000 



Source: RAB. 1 July 1958. 1 July 1957, 
sets in working order. "No new information. 



Type 



Home 
Auto 



Total 



Feb. 1959 Feb. 1958 

474,888 420,065 1,175,378 954,705 

420,052 268,445 852,603 618.124 

894,940 688.510 2,027,981 1,572,829 

Source: Electronic Industries Assn. Home figures are retail sales, auto figures are 
' ii i"i v production. 



2 Months 
1959 



2 Months 
1958 



2. CURRENT LISTENING PATTERNS 



Nielsen Auto-Plus during selected peak periods 



i Mon.-Fri.) 
7-7: J 5 a.m. 
8-8:13 a.m. 
4-4: 15 p.m. 
3-5: I 5 p. in. 

(Sat. I 

l-l :30 p.m. 

'Sun.) 

3-3:30 p.m. 



New 


Y 


:>rlc 


Chicago 


Dallas 




Los 


Angeles 


% 
n-homc 




% 
in auto 


°o 
in-home 


% 

in auto 


% 
in-home 




°0 

in auto 


°0 

in-home 




% 
in auto 


18.5 




3.3 


28.5 


4.8 


25.1 




4.5 


11.2 




5.5 


24.6 




3.4 


30.6 


3.4 


21.6 




3.0 


15.6 




2.0 


8.8 




3.7 


13.0 


3.9 


12.1 




3.8 


13.7 




5.3 


10.6 




3.9 


L3.9 


4.4 


13.8 




4.4 


1 1.:> 




4.8 



18.7 



i.;. i 



3.r> 



3.1 



I 1.2 



1.9 



3.7 



3.0 



I I.I 



8.7 



3.6 



2.9 



L5.3 



3.2 



3.5 



- uro \ 0, Nlel in Oo Percent total households In each market tuned to radio at home and In autos. U tagelet Ian 1959; Ne« fori and Dallas, 
I; Chici M.H 1959 



1,'i 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

SPONSOR • 2.") APRIL l°.V> 



SCORE! 

If you are not piling up record sales points in San Diego, you 
are just not trying. Here is the real bounce and action of 
America today! The 19th market. KFMB Radio is here to help 
call your shots. Nice people with music that paces the swift, 
changing tempo. Variety programming for a variety of listen- 
ers. World news from CBS. Local tidings from the hometown 
reporters our fellow citizens turn to first — and believe. 
Living, buying and listening to KFMB Radio are the biggest 
audiences in the better <jryj^M^|gfiMAjttgVf p;irt oi Southern ( !ali- 
fornia. Don't sit mi 7,^V V - '..C^vv rhc sidelines — 

the whistle hasjS» , jL. \f f^kk*hlown. Take the 



ball with KFMB 




Radio. Score now! 



KFMB RADIO W SAN DIEGO 



REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO.. INC. 



sponsor • 25 april L959 



19 



TOP MAN 

on the Totem Pole 




All On 



WREX-TV 



Rank 



Program 



Rating Station 



1. 


I've Got a Secret 


53.6 


WREX-TV 


2. 


The Millionaire 


53.1 


WREX-TV 


3. 


Program X 


52.2 


Sta. B 


4. 


Jack Benny 


50.2 


WREX-TV 


5. 


G. E. Theater 


49.8 


WREX-TV 


6. 


Father Knows Best 


49.4 


WREX-TV 


7. 


Gunsmoke 


48.8 


WREX-TV 


8. 


Lawrence Welk 


46.9 


WREX-TV 


9. 


Danny Thomas 


46.5 


WREX-TV 


10. 


Person to Person 


46.3 


WREX-TV 


11. 


State Trooper 


45.2 


WREX-TV 


12. 


The Lineup 


45.2 


WREX-TV 


13. 


Lassie 


44.8 


WREX-TV 


14. 


Playhouse 90 


44.5 


WREX-TV 


15. 


Red Skelton 


44.4 


WREX-TV 


16. 


Program X 


44.4 


Sta. B 


17. 


Have Gun, 








Will Travel 


43.5 


WREX-TV 


18. 


Bing Crosby 


43.2 


WREX-TV 


19. 


December Bride 


42.7 


WREX-TV 


20. 


What's My Line 


41.2 


WREX-TV 


21. 


Name That Tune 


41.2 


WREX-TV 


22. 


Disney Presents 


40.2 


WREX-TV 


23. 


Ed Sullivan 


40.2 


WREX-TV 


24. 


U. S. Marshal 


39.9 


WREX-TV 


25. 


Pat Boone 


39.5 


WREX-TV 



METROPOLITAN ROCKFORD ARB— 

FEB. 9— MAR. 8, 1959 

Demontirating AGAIN WREX-TV'i Audience Leadership 







50 



I 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Esso Standard Oil Co., New York, is lining up schedules in various 
markets for its Atlas tires. The four-week campaign starts 20 May. 
Minutes and chainbreaks during nighttime periods are being placed; 
frequencies depend upon the market. The buyers are Sy Goldis and 
Joe Granda; the agency is McCann-Erickson. Inc.. New York. 

J. A. Folger & Co., Kansas City, is entering scattered markets for 
ils coffees. The schedules start this month for six to eight weeks, 
depending upon the market. Minute announcements, both dav and 
night slots, are being used, with frequencies varying. The buyer is 
Al Randall; the agency is Cunningham & Walsh, Inc.. New York. 

Standard Brands, Inc., New York, is going into major markets 
with schedules for its Instant Chase & Sanborn coffee. The schedules 
start 3 May, run till the end of the year. Minutes and chainbreaks 
during nighttime periods are being slotted; frequencies depend upon 
the market. The buyers are Bob Liddel and Howard Potter: the 
agency is Compton Advertising, Inc.. New York. 

Boyle-Midway, l)i\. of American Home Products Corp., New York, 
is preparing a campaign in various markets for its Black Flag insecti- 
cide. The 17- week schedules start 18 Mav. Daytime 20-second an- 
nouncements are being bought: frequencies varj from market to 
market. The buyer is Mario Kircher; the agency is J. Walter 
Thompson Co., New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

Cities Service Co., New 1<>rk. is going into major markets with 
schedules to promote its station dealers; distribution is national. 
The six-week campaign starts this month. I.I), and minute announce- 
ment dining daytime segments arc being used: frequencies depend 
upon the market. The luncrs are Dan Kane and Man Howling; 
the agency is Ellington & Co., New York. 

Ford Motor Co., Lincoln-Edsel-Mercun Div., Dearborn. Mich., is 
kicking off a short-term campaign in top markets for its Edsel. The 
three- week schedules start 4 May. Minutes during daUime >l«>l> are 
being placed: frequencies \ar\ from market l<> market. The buyer 
i> l.d Kobza: the agenc\ i^ Kenyon & Eckhardt, New York. 

Cannon Mills, Inc., New York, is preparing schedules in majoi 
markets Eor its June White Sales. The campaign starts II May, runs 
for four weeks. Daytime and weekend minute announcements are 
being purchased: frequencies depend upon the market. The buyer is 
J. Coverlej Smith: agency is N. \\ . Vyei Si Son. Inc.. Philadelphia. 



SPONSOR 



25 April 1959 



% 




those who live on air... 




In the last three decades advertisers and their agencies 
have spent billions <>i dollars on air. A lot of people 
lived on it. A lot of goods were moved. 

To those who live on air SPONSOR serves a function 
no other publication can match, for SPONSOR is 
the most definitive study of air in the broadcast in- 
dustry. It is the news of air— the plans of air— the 
progress of air— the thoughts of air— the very life of 
air— delivered to you every week — 52 weeks a year. 



and earn its salt are just much too important for 
light reading on a routing list. 

If you live on air — read SPONSOR at home. Read 
it on A time, B time or C time but make sure it's 
free time at home. At the price of only S^ .1 year you 
can have 52 issues ot this most useful publication in 
the held at your side — to see, study, tear out and file. 
It's the best investment you'll ever make. Order your 
home subscription today. 



Most every man who's gotten anywhere in air reads 
SPONSOR. The man who wants to get there faster 
reads SPONSOR at home— because the very chem- 
istry of broadcasting— the factors that make it move 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



In a period off "promotion spectaculars", SPONSOR ASKS: 



Is "carnival" promotion good for 



With some stations using pub- 
licity ballyhoo to hypo listener- 
ship, broadcast people discuss 
the propriety of this approach. 

Elizabeth Griffith, media buyer jor 
Br) an Houston 

The radio ad promotion which is 
most effective today is the kind that 
is integrated with the program itself. 

In order to scout out the best pos- 
sible business for clients we like to 






Only when 
it is tied 
in with the 
programing 



be continuously aware of all audience 
promotion techniques that have 
proven effective without dimming 
the programs entertainment value. 
\n example ol such a promotion de- 
sire thai has the most direct applica- 
tion to the particular needs of certain 
advertisers is the popular mobile unit. 
used to interview people on the spot. 
There are few places where the 
mobile unit doesn t go today. For 
instance, supermarkets. Interviews 
usuall) don't take place on the week- 
ends when store traffic is heavy but 

lend to OCCUr in the middle of the 
week. The presence of the local radio 
personalit) in the supermarket then 
both generates traffic and provides 

taped inter\iews to be used on the 

air in future programs. 

Much of the audience promotion 
thai a number of radio stations 
throughout the countr) have initialed 
ovei the past six months or a year is 

aimed at teenagers. Some of these 
"record clubs"' have drawn a good 
response and are pai t iciilai l\ suitable 

to the advertiser anxious to reach 
ilii- segment ol the population. 

It might be useful to see some 
more promotion aimed at housewife 



participation, since this is the audi- 
ence that the packaged goods adver- 
tiser is most concerned with, such as 
the supermarket interviews. A stand- 
ard audience promotion device that 
does stir up some interest is the 
mailing out of program logs, but 
there may be room here for some 
more imaginative techniques. 

Newspapers have long used such 
stunts as contests to build their own 
circulation. While it is desirable for 
a medium to expend effort for circu- 
lation purposes, promotion stunts oc- 
casionally get out of hand. 

The agency media buyer evalu- 
ating a station for his client is still 
far more concerned with programing 
content, ratings, audience composi- 
tion and the station's over-all position 
in the market. It is usually when the 
programing content and promotion 
are combined that the results are 
most effective. If the station also uses 
— and uses judiciously — audience 
promotion stunts to build its circu- 
lation, this becomes an additional 
factor in its favor. But it cannot take 
the place of the four basic considera- 
tions. 



Jeremy D. Sprague, asst. media 

super.. Cunningham S: Walsh. Inc., \. 1. 

\d\erlisers purchase a medium in 
order to deliver a message to an au- 
dience. Building and holding circu- 
lation is therefore a major problem 
of all media, and audience promotion 
consequently becomes of prime im- 
portance. As is the case with ever) 
field of human endeavor, there are 
olten excesses. 

Before wc start to pick on radio. 
[el s remember that audience promo- 
tion "gimmicks" have always been 
with ii-. Newspapers run rebus games 
and crossword puzzles. Magazines 
offer amazing discounts for "trial" 
subscriptions. The old Liberty used 

to seduce \oung bo\s into peddling 
their papers with the promise of earn- 
ing a 1 > i c ■ \ cle i I ne\ er even came 



close). The result is that the section 
of the ABC reports dealing with how 
circulation is obtained is one of the 
most important: circulation which is 
not entirely "voluntary" is naturalb 
suspect on the basis of reader-listener 
interest. 

Radio stations too, have done their 
share of promoting, and in today's 
world of dog-eat-Nielsen. the fight is 
really on. The gimmicks used by ra- 
dio have grown from the simple 
"call-in" by which a listener could 
win the right to have his name broad- 
cast to elaborate contests, treasure 
hunts, lucky license plates, and disk 
jockeys who can sta\ awake longer 
than a timebuyer at a station partv. 

Is this good? Well, some of the 
gimmicks are annoying, and some are 



c 



\ 



It can 
accomplish 
good results 



I 



just plain sill\. and some are not 
backed up 1>\ good programing. And 
worst of all. some are conducted only 
during rating week! Unfortunately, 
as always, the few really bad exam- 
ples hog most of the publicitj . 

For the most part, stations are 
using health) imagination and inge- 
nuit\ in an attempt to build and hold 
audiences, with the desire |o become 
a better advertising vehicle 



Arthur M. Tolchin, vice-president and 

director. II \K.\I. Ve«l I oil. 

There is quite a difference between 
"carnival" promotion devices and 
showmanship in good taste to in- 
crease listenership. Cheap gimmicks 
will not attract a consistent audi- 
ence. The dav of the flagpole siller 
is over and like most other leading 
station- throughout the country, we 



12 



SPONSOH 



25 ipril L959 



radio? 




ii\ to emplo) publicity thai is imag- 
inative luit sophisticated. 

It is Fundamental in \\ MGM'a 
thinking that listener and public 
service interest be our first objective 



Cheap 

gimmicks do 
not build 
audiences 



.mil responsibility. It is similar!) 
axiomatic thai the advertiser is en- 
titled to enjo\ results from his- ex- 
penditures over ciii station. Constant 
attention and supervision, as well as 
ever) bit o\ creative abilit) we pos- 
sess, is exercised at all times to pro- 
vide a proper balance. 

\ vast amount id promotion, pub- 
licit) and exploitation has been em- 
ployed in newspapers, l>u> and ear 
cards, billboards, three sheet posters, 
and on-the-air to bring \\ M(»M to 
the attention of new listeners as well 
as keeping our regular listeners in- 
formed and appreciative of our pro- 
graming and standing. 

We have, however, employed in 
the past three \ears. for periods of 
2d and .'V> we?ks. the famous series 
of Same It and Claim It on-the-air 
contests, a contest which depends 
upon the listeners employing their 
knowledge and intelligence, and with- 
out luck being a factor. It was not 
unusual to receive 50,000 to 80,000 
entries weekly. 

Recently, the Peter Tripp sleep 
deprivation experiment, held in ((in- 
junction with the \rmed Services and 
the March of Dimes, was instrumental 
in providing all concerned one of the 
finest public relations results ever 
achieved. 

These promotions have been show- 
manship with a flair — without step- 
ping into that area of tawdrv bally- 
hoo. \nd the) have accomplished 
our ohje; tives. ^ 



WCSH-TV 6 



NBC Affiliate 



Portland, Maine 




Now NBC Chimes 

a Maine duet to 

the tune of IV2 billion 

That's the combined effective buying income 
of Maine's two major markets - - Portland and 
Bangor. And now NBC covers them best over 
WCSH-TV, Portland and WLBZ-TV, Bangor's 
new NBC outlet. 

And remember you save an extra 5% when 
you purchase matching spot schedules on both 
stations. 

Your Weed TV Man has the full story on 
both markets. 

A MAIIIE WCSH ' TV l6)-Portland 
WLBZ-TV (2)-Bangor 
BROADCASTING SYSTEM WCSH-Radio-Portland 



STATION 



WLBZ-Radio- Bangor 
WRDO-Radio— Augusta 



SPONSOR 



25 vi-kii. i<)5«) 






Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaigns 



TV RESULTS 



DRY CLEANING 

SPONSOR, Kraus Company 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: Kraus. a quality dry cleaning opera- 
tion of Memphis, Tenn., has four years cultivated the "car- 
riage trade," and emphasized delivery and pick-up service. 
Their deliver) men wear white caps, and have been pro- 
moted as the "White Cap Men."" Although Kraus has used 
various media to promote its service for a number of years, 
they turned to television only recently. "After we started 
our first telecast of Union Pacific on WHBQ-TV we soon 
noticed its impact on our sales," stated Jerry Daleke, sales 
manager of the dry cleaner. Prior to using tv, Kraus 
noticed that telephone calls had been off. People were not 
calling at the same rate as the year before. "Since our cam- 
paign began on WHBQ-TV. telephone calls have increased 
by nearly 5000." Daleke continued. "This means that the 
Kraus White Cap men are getting into more homes than ever 
before. ' So pleased was Kraus by the direct sales results 
from t\ that they plan to amplify their present schedule. 

WHBQ-TV, Memphis Sponsorship 



NEW CAR DEALER 

SPONSOR: Reynolds & Seiler Rambler AGENCY: Stan Warner 

Advertising 

Capsule case history: A Rambler dealer was so deluged 
with crowds after sponsorship of the Early Late Show on 
KTVU. San Francisco, that he prayed for rain to keep some 
of the overwhelming throngs away. The Saturday following 
the first tv advertising by the Reynolds & Seiler dealership 
was a rainy day, but partners Robert Reynolds and Harry 
Seiler estimated that more than 500 people came by, as a 
direct result of the KTVU advertising. "Thank heavens for 
the rain — it kept some of the crowd away," remarked 
Reynolds. Reynolds further reports that in the 10 days 
following, some 26 units were moved; and that many of the 
remaining prospects are still considered "hot."' "\\ e 
checked each sale closely, and proved to our satisfaction that 
KTVU sold these automobiles," stated Reynolds. The Ram- 
bler dealer sponsors the first half of the feature movie — 
which is presented from 10:15 p.m. to conclusion — each 
Frida\ night. The advertiser is thoroughly sold on television. 



KTVU, San Francisco 



Program 



RUG & CARPET CLEANERS 

SPONSOR: Murnan Rug & Linoleum Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Murnan Rug and Linoleum Co., 
a medium-sized retail store of Omaha, Neb., devoted its 
entire advertising budget to newspaper for the past five 
years. In March 1959 they decided to give tv a trial: KETV 
received 65% of its total budget while the newspaper got 
'>•">'< . The one-month tv campaign consisted of 50 10-second 
spots, ROS, of which 12 ran between 7 and 9:30 p.m. The 
total percentage of business increase of the month-long cam- 
paign, I ".tli newspaper and tv, was 700 r /{ . Of this, however, 
Murnan attributed 90% to KETV and 10$ to the news- 
paper. Customers were asked where the\ learned about 
Murnan. Nine out of 10 replied, "on tv". KETV was the 
onlj television used in this campaign. "It has been proven 
to ii- that our most successful advertising campaign to date 
has been our schedule on KETV," stated Charles Murnan. 
the store's owner. "We plan to sia\ on for several months 
with similar schedules on the station throughout the day." 



M IN. Mm, I,., 



51 



\iinc>imr<'iiirnt- 



LUMBER & BLDG. MATERIAL 

SPONSOR: kclsey & Freeman Lumber Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Kelsev & Freeman Lumber Co., 
a large Toledo firm which retails lumber and a variety of 
building supplies and equipment, held a "Building Materials 
Exposition" as a large-scale business building promotion. 
Planned as a one-company trade fair, the "Building Mate- 
rials Exposition"" exhibited a wide selection of building 
materials and hardware — all the necessary components to 
build an entire house. In order to assure sufficient crowds 
attending the displays. Kelsex \ Freeman turned to televi- 
sion and placed a schedule on WTOL-TV. Toledo. "To -,i\ 
that our 'Building Materials Exposition' was a great suc- 
cess is putting it mildl\." stated Walter DeBrock. an official 
of the lumber company. "Our compan) never has had such 
a splendid response never before have we had such crowds, 
all interested in building materials, ranging from a new door 
lock to a complete house." K & 1 gives t\ complete credit 
for the promotions success, and the\ plan to use it again. 



WTOL-TV, Toledo 



SI'ONSOlf 



Announcements 



2i MMtii. 1959 



MSHIBRHHIWfirX 




At the beauty bar, soaps, hair preparations and 
cosmetics advertised on WWJ-TV are more apt to 
get attention, more likely to be purchased. 

The reason? WWJ-TV adds an extra measure of 
believability to your advertising. People in south- 
eastern Michigan have faith in WWJ-TV, recognize 
its leadership, appreciate its high standards. 

Give your Detroit campaigns this big advantage. 
Buy WWJ-TV, Detroit's Believability Station. 



"*££> 




ASSOCIATE AM-FM STATION WWJ 

Firtl in Michigan • Ownad t Offroltd by Th» O+troil N«»i 

National Representative!: Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 2.1 APRIL L959 



55 



"Me 



an 



J.K. 



is just like this!" WJAR-TV not only has a corner on quality feature films in the Providence 
market, but also exposes them with rare showmanship. Morning and afternoon films, for example, 
are emceed daily by personable Jay Kroll who asks viewers to write and tell him what they would 
like to see, then waits for the mailman to clue him 
on local tastes. Between "acts", Jay interviews 
visiting celebrities, and leaders of local and national 
civic groups. "The Jay Kroll Show" — another 
good reason why WJAR-TV has won the TV heart 
of the Providence Market. 



10th Anniversary of CHANNEL 10 




WJAR-TV 



NBC 



Cock-of-the-walk in the PROVIDENCE MARKET 
ABC • Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 




56 



SPONSOR • 25 VPRIL L959 




25 APRIL 1959 

Ownlfht 1950 

•FONMft 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



If hot's happening in II . S. Government 
ffiat affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



The FCC, which buckpedaled under pressure on pay-tv, has now surrendered 
on vhf booster stations also: To some extent, the Commission has decided to re- 
verse itself on community antenna tv systems (CATV). 

The Commission will not only license vhf boosters, but it has asked Congress to change 
the law which does not now permit licensing of any facility built without a construction permit. 

Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.) and Sen. Warren Magnuson (D., Wash.), chairmen of the re- 
spective Commerce Commitees which consider such legislation, immediately introduced bills to 
that effect. 

The Commission did make some reservations. It doesn't want any boosters on channels 4 
and 5 where they might interfere with public safety and aeronautical services. It doesn't want 
boosters to rebroadcast on the same channels as the originating stations to avoid interference. 
But it does want very low power, and it asks that the booster have the consent of the 
originating station. 



May 4 has been set as the day for network officials to come down to Washington 
to defend their programing practices. 

The most serious charge in the FCC programing hearings about to start is that the net- 
works refuse prime time to programs in which they don't have an interest. FCC chief hearing 
examiner James D. Cunningham will listen to what they have to say. 



As forecast on this page from time to time, the House Commerce Legislative 
Oversight subcommitee has no immediate intention of getting back to probes of 
the FCC. Nor of additional contested tv cases. 

This much was made clear as chairman Oren Harris hired new staff members to replace 
departed ones, and as a tentative agenda was decided upon. Other agencies will take at least 
the early brunt, with any return to the FCC even at a later date probably dependent more upon 
what a new rival Senate Judiciary subcommittee might do along lines of creating 
headlines. 

Nor does the Harris commitee propose to work for any deep changes in the FCC. First 
work, in fact, will probably be on the comparatively mild Harris bill which merely provides 
penalties for off-the- record presentations to Commissioners, as well as for commissioners who 
listen. 



Rosel H. Hyde, who has been an FCC commissioner since 1946, an FCC em- 
ployee since the FCC was founded, chairman from April 1953 to October 1954, 
and with the predecessor Federal Radio Commission from 1928, stays on. 

Responding to urging from Congress and the broadcasting industry, the President nomi- 
nated Commissioner Hyde for another seven-year term. 

This is a far cry from the period of hysteria about Harris subcommittee revelations, 
when it was predicted that present commissioners would be forced to resign on a "new 
broom" theory. 



sponsor • 25 APRIL 1959 



57 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



** FILM-SCOPE 



25 APRIL 1959 There's a sizzling research story behind Nestle's order for 52 extra markets on 

temrriiht i»m its Roy Rogers re-runs. 

sponsor Jt' s thjg. according to January national Nielsen averages, Roy Rogers although syndi- 

publioations mo. rated in only 31 markets, edged out the number of homes watching Nestle's other 

show, the 52-city network Lone Ranger. 

McCann-Erickson research made a further projection that the 18.3 Nielsen earned by the 
Rogers re-runs in 31 cities will be worth 22.0 when the new 83 city list becomes effective. 
Roy Rogers Syndication, Inc. was formed one year ago to handle these re-runs. 



Syndicators may be crossing themselves up in trying to sell the same show to 
network buyers one week and regional sponsors the next. 

Asks Jerry Hyams, of Screen Gems: "A lot of agency men buy for both network and re- 
gional clients. How can you pretend to a film buyer that you've got a new show when you 
know he screened it last week for another client?" 

The Screen Gems solution: keep network and syndicated production absolutely 
autonomous. 



You can expect ABC Films to get back into first-run production under the new 
leadership of Henry Plitt. 

Two new shows slated to be ready for fall are The Racer, an adventure series on sports 
cars, and Simon Lash, a mystery on a lawyer turned detective. 

Film buyers were surprised at the recent appointment of Plitt, a motion picture veteran 
without tv film experience, as ABC Films prexy; but others have pointed out that his knowl- 
edge of Midwestern and Southern audience likes and dislikes could save ABC Films some of 
the regional snags other film sellers have encountered. 



A flurry of midyear guest appearances by syndication stars have been bolster- 
ing shows and also helping blue-chip advertisers to work up internal sales 
enthusiasm. 

Two stars doing recent city-by-city promotion were: 

• Richard Webb, of CBS Films' U. S. Border Patrol, who hit New York, Boston, Washing- 
ton, Charlotte and New Orleans, mostly for Amoco. 

• Richard Carlson of Ziv's Mackenzie's Raiders, who visited Detroit and Chicago for Ram- 
bler dealers, and Louisville for Brown & Williamson. 



The complexion of the tape situation seems to have changed to one of continu- 
ous inching forward on a number of fronts with an end in sight to explosive 
changes of last year. 

Ampex, for example, last week did an end run around the multiple lines-per-screen sys- 
tems used around the world by introducing a modification on its recorder to accommodate 
any or all standards — but note this: It's the camera that must be switched and many cameras 
now in use don't have this feature. 



58 sponsor • 25 april 1959 







FILM-SCOPE continued 



The key to one of the tricks of syndication sales tactics appear! to he the ques- 
tion of whether or not the film distributor also owns the show it's selling. 

A syndicator like CNP, for example, this season showed widely varying behavior in it* 
two network deals. On Lawless Years (which it owns), the contract called for a S12,500-pcr 
week loss on network runs, but on Philip Marlowe (which Goodson-Todman owns), the sale 
reflected an estimated $5,000-per-week profit. 

The implications for the local-regional film buyer are this: you can often press a dis- 
tributor much harder on a show he owns than on a show he is only distributing for someone 
else. 



Re-run and feature film sales are still a revenue backbone of syndication, de- 
spite the emphasis on new production this year. 

One syndication sales executive admitted last week that dependable income from re- 
peats was essential to cover the risks involved in shooting new shows. 



Several significant indications of timebuying preferences came out of the recent NBC 
Spot Sales report #4 which, although prepared to push live shows, had implications for film 
as well. 

A panel of 271 timebuyers revealed opinions including these: 

1) There was a dead heat on the issue of whether live or film programing is the pre- 
ferred buy on the half-hour local level. 

2) On the question of host personalities, they were of "iireat importance" in children's 
cartoon shows to 72% of buyers but in feature films to only 18%. 

3) Salient factors in buying feature films ranked in this order: first, history <>f the time 
period; then, strength of the station's film library; finally, current ratings. 



COMMERCIALS 



Look for an all-out battle to shape up for supremacy in the new tape commer- 
cials field between the creative men and the cost efficiency experts. 

On the creative side, the argument is that tape should bring to tv the same kind of pres- 
tige that fashion photography gave to magazines, while, on the business side, the thinking is 
that tape must bring more speed and economy per yard to tv than were possible via film 
methods. 



With an injection of Warner Brothers money as a hypo, Filmways is now un- 
dertaking the ambitious plan of building what's claimed to be the largest produc- 
tion facility in the East. 

Starting from a home base of tv commercials and industrial films business, the new Film- 
ways plant, operational this summer, has its eye on getting a piece of video tape commercials 
and program business and even getting into tv film programs and theatrical featur--. 



A build-up of commercials activity in Chicago is taking place now in an at- 
tempt to take away a share of business that now goes to New York and Hollywood. 

Fred Niles, for example, following his absorption of Kling facilities in Chicago, is now 
amassing a phalanx of midwest film personnel, his latest additions being Elliott Schick, Les 
Urbach and H. Richard Hertel. 



SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



59 




A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 






SPONSOR HEARS 



25 APRIL 195? 

C*»yrl|ht l»M 

•PON SOB 

PUBLICATION* INO. 



A popular guess across luncheon tables in the Madison Avenue sector the past "week 
was that a major network figure is headed for replacement. 
The date most frequently cited: mid-May. 



The toughest jobs to fill, according to agency managers, are high-grade associ- 
ate media directorships. 

At the moment three New York agencies are scurrying around for candidates. One 
of the openings involves supervision over $20-$25-million worth of outlays. 



An observation made by a hep agency showman: One of the big advantages that tv 
has over other facets of show business is that it's got the largest number of pro- 
gram and idea suppliers. 

The competition among this expanding host increases the chances of new fare being 
fed into the medium with each season. 



Reps get accustomed to the strangest requests; but the circumstances that led up to 
this one left even the veterans shook up! 

Invited to attend an open house (ostensibly to explain the inner functions of a Mid- 
west agency), the reps were told they would be doing clients they know a favor by 
steering them toward that agency. 



A Madison Avenue agency loaded with tv specials has developed the knack of 
salving clients via alternate expedients: 

1) If the rating turns out fine, the agency cites that number as an emblem of 
success. 

2) Should the rating be a little limp, the agency calls attention to the good review 
the show got in the Y. Y. Times. 



The present reluctance of certain personalities to have themselves pitted next 
fall against Jack Benny, Perry Como, and even the Ford 60-90-minute series recalls to old- 
timers a similar situation that prevailed hi radio's heydey. 

Regarded as "poison spots" then were such as these: Chase & Sanborn Hour, Jack 
Benny, Fibber McGee & Molly, Rudy Valle (Fleishmann's Yeast), Kraft Music Hall (Bing 
Crosby), and the Lux Theatre. 



(,() 



The i-n«liiiu and beginning of new eras in business organizations often bring 
with them a sense of human bewilderment and poignancy. 

One giant operation in the trade is now in the process of weeding out the older 
generation of upper executives and replacing it with much younger men who are both 
graduates of top-rank business schools and experienced in corporate management. 

The poignant side: Most of the shunted are barely in their late 50s and feel that 
they've still got what it takes to carry on their functions efficiently. 

SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 





Nothing else like it 

in Greater New York 

IN PROGRAMMING: The voice of WVNJ is 
unique. It's the only radio station in the entire 
Metropolitan New York area that plays 
just Great Albums of Music from sign on to 
sign off — 365 days a year. 

IN AUDIENCE: So different, too. So largely 
adult — so able to buy — so able to persuade 
others to buy. And in Essex County alone 
(pop. 983,000) WVNJ dominates in 
audience — in quality of audience — 
and in prestige. 

IN VALUE: It delivers the greater New York 
audience for less than 31c per thousand homes — 
by tar the lowest cost of any radio station 
in the market. 

RADIO STATION OF 'Hht Ketiuuk JXrlUS 

national rep: Broadcast Time Sales * New York, N. Y. • MU 4 6740 




SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



61 



WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS tt 
PICTURES 



THE PRETTIEST HOUSEWIFE in Southern California: That's the title Mary Lu Stevens won 
in a contest run by K-DAY, Santa Monica. Here she's lunching with husband Peter (r) and K- 
DAY general manager Irv Phillips, before embarking on a nation-wide tour of major cities 




AWARD TO BROADCASTERS for "contributions in promoting the Motion Picture Industry," 
is made by Missouri-Illinois Theater Owners Assn., represented here by Jerry Berger (c) 
to John Box, Jr. (I) exec. v. p., Balaban Stations and Charlotte Peters, KSD-TV, St. Louis 




ADVERTISERS 



Lanolin IMus kirks oft' its drive 
next Meek to recapture a sizable 
chunk of the $300 million vita- 
min market for its recently- 
acquired Kybutol. 

The million-dollar campaign will 
tell the Rybutol story via 5,000 tv 
and radio spots per week, for three 
months, in 163 markets. 

The major portion of the cam- 
paign will he lodged with the three 
networks, plus leading independent 
stations in each market. Agency : 
EWR&R. 

Other campaigns: 

• Renault will spend $2 million 
in national advertising during the 
next six months. A similar sum is 
expected to come from Renault deal- 
ers. \genc\ : \I.\K. 

• Slenderella International will 
increase its spot t\ campaign from 
12 to 28 markets, beginning 1 May, 
calling for an increased budget to 



NEW I.D.'s presented by KHJ-TV, LA. over 
WOR-TV, N.Y. get the close scrutiny of 
(I to r) Helen Levendis, Hal Cummings, Mary 
Dwyer, John Hughes, Shel Boden, all of 
Compton; and Jerry Molfese (rear) of H-R Tv 




LET'S GET TO WORK is mood of William 
Schudt, CBS v.p. (standing) and Fred Knorr, 
president of Knorr Broadcasting as they scan 
schedule after inking affiliate agreement 




SPONSOR 



25 U>RIL 1959 



|120,000. To reach the i areei girls 
who constitute 1095 "I Slenderella's 
clientele, minutes will be used in the 
daytime and from *) p.m. -midnight. 
Agencj : Product Sen ices, I nc. 

• Toda) i 25 > mai ki the begin- 
ning of Bah] Week, with Gerber 
Products <'o. promoting ii via its 
new theme: \X hat's I >uj Line 
Babies. Uong with print, the Week 
will iiei a special plaj on CBS l\ a 

Captniu Kangaroo, Jimmy Dean and 
/ I. ore Lucy. \«enc\ : D'Arcy. 

• Another beginner todaj : The 
auto racing season, which continues 
through (> September. To promote it, 
Polo Grounds Speedway, Inc., 
ISew York, will use radio and t\ spots 
throughout the Metropolitan area. 
Agenc) : W illiam \\ arren, Jackson \ 
Delanej . 

• Entertainment Premium 
Corp. will launch a spot tv cam- 
paign in Metropolitan New York to 
promote it- new trading stamp premi- 
um plan. The stations to be used: 
\\ "ABC -TV. WOR-T\ and WNEW- 
T\ . The plan that EPC is conduct- 



with Food I hi 
Stoic-: Btamps can be exchanged foi 

Broadwa) shows oi best-selling 1 ks. 

Agencj : Product Sei i ices, Inc. 

Financial report: First quarter, 

1 •).">•) net -ales at I*. l.orillaril (ai. : 
$ll.'M!K8."l.~> compared with $104,- 

094,971 for the like period, 1958 . . . 
First quarter L959 net sales for the 
Gillette Co.! $46,251 million, com- 
pared with $42,877 million in 1958. 

Ilii-.i 'n' data: The L959 annual 
stockholders meeting of American 
Machine & Foundry, held in \aw 
^i ork last week, was recorded by 
NBC, with portions aired in the p.m. 
to o i \ » ■ listeners an opportunity to 
learn how a major company conducts 
a shareholders meeting ... A new 
corporate symbol: Minnegasco, an 
Indian maiden designed 1>\ Knox 
Reeves Advertising for the Minneap- 
olis Gas Co., to appear in all MGC 
advertising . . . Tom I hum Con- 
venience Markets has opened three 
additional markets in St. Petersburg, 



Fla., with t w o more to follow, to be 
promoted i ia radio spots. Vgem j : 
Frank B. Sawdon. 

Stricth personnel: Three mana- 
ge] ial appointments foi \i moui v\ 
Co. a newly-formed Grocer) Products 
Division: V. W. Jones, assistanl t" 
the advei tising and men bandising 
manager; M. I). Kcil. brand man- 
ager, Dial Boaps and Bhampoo; and 
I'. I). Beece, brand manager, Dash 

dog I I ... I.. ( !. Dorn. named as- 

sistanl national advertising manage] 

of Che\ rolet, at Detroit. 



AGENCIES 



"Government can properly em- 
ploy the services of advertising 
on a scale five to I times its u*c 
today" according to McCann- 

Erickson's Marion Harper. Jr. 

The auenc\ president, -peaking he- 
fore the Chicago federated \dver- 
tising Club last week, felt that the 
<jo\ eminent - limited use ol ad\ei li-- 




THEY LIKE IT LIVE so 7,000 Ft. Waynians turn out weekly for wrest- 
ling matches in WPTA studios. Here station's Tom Atkins interviews 
Cowboy Ellis after match, which is half-sponsored by Carling. Say 
distributors: "We now have hottest beer in town as result of show" 

sponsor • 25 april 1959 



ZIV ENTHUSIASM PLAN goes into action as Bold Venture star 
Dane Clark visits Ballantine plant, greets oldest employee, Charley 
Jones. Plan's aim: closer identification of program to sponsor employees 




HORSE-DRAWN BUGGIES brought 500 agency people to KDKA-TV, 
(Pittsburgh) showing of "The Great Victor Herbert." To promote 
Paramount package, station recreated Herbert's life in three-block area 




Summ Adio sees where 




the family goes 




Vacation may mean getting away 
from home. ..but Radio goes along. 

You're traveling "right" with SPOT 
RADIO in your summer media plans. 

Reach people-wherever they are, 
at home or on vacation -with SPOT 
RADIO. 



SPONSORED BY MEMBER FIRMS OF 




Avery-Knodel Inc. — John Blair & Company — Broadcast Time Sales 

Thomas F. Clark Co. Inc. — Harry E. Cummings — Robert E. Eastman & Co. Inc. 

H-R Representatives Inc. — The Katz Agency Inc. — McGavren-Quinn Company 

The Meeker Company Inc. — Art Moore Associates Inc. — Richard O'Connell Inc. 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward. Inc. — William J. Reilly, Inc. 

Radio-TV Representatives Inc. — Weed Radio Corporation — Adam Young Inc. 

MAY IS NATIONAL RADIO MONTH 



ing can be attributed to tradition and 
"advertising's association, not only 
with business and trade, but with 
showmanship." 

Harper foresees these government 
benefits from using advertising: 
"Better knowledge of the audi- 
ence; more effective information 
programs; and more responsible 
and ethical communications. " 

His conclusions: 
1) Each major government depart- 
ment should have a public infor- 
mation appropriation in its over- 
all budget for the use of paid 
advertising. 
The advertising industry should 



2) 



continue to furnish its services 
free to the local, national and 
world community, as a matter of 
good citizenship. 

The merger talks between Fletch- 
er Richards, Calkins & Holden 
and Cohen & Aleshire are off, 
with this aftermath: 

The Norwich Pharmacal's $1 mil- 
lion account for its Nebs and other 
new products, awarded to the Rich- 
ards agency last week, has been 
moved to Cohen & Aleshire. 

The confusion probably stemmed 
from this: The agencies made a joint 
presentation to Norwich, with the 



IT'S JUST — 
NO CONTEST" 




WJAC"TV is way out front 

in the Johnstown-Altoona area! 

Go by limousine, not by flivver! With WJAC-TV you travel 
"first class" with 71.9 station share of audience, sign-on to 
sign-off, all week long, as compared to only 28.1 for WFBG-TV 

Figures from ARB, November, 1958 

TOP 30 SHOWS ON WJAC-TV 

Johnstown-Altoona Trendex, Feb., 1959 



Buy the station that delivers 
the viewers— nearly three times 
as many viewers for WJAC-TV 
as for the nearest competitor. 
You get a guaranteed audience 
when vou buv \V.IA( T\ ! 




Get all the fads from 
HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS, INC. 



package-goods account going to 
Richards on the assumption that the 
merger would take place. 

Nebs' previous aaencv: FC&B. 

Other agency appointments: The 

Wildroot hair preparation division 
of Colgate, billing S3 million, from 
BBDO to Ted Bates . . . The 
Petri division of United Vintners, 
billing $750,000, from Y&R to 
Honig-Cooper, Harrington & 
Miner, San Francisco, which has 
been handling the Italian Swiss Colo- 
ny division since 1951 . . . Chun 
King Enterprises' American-Oriental 
canned and frozen foods, from JWT. 
Chicago, to BBDO, Minneapolis . . . 
Structo Manufacturing Co.. Freeport, 
111., toy makers, billing $250,000, to 
EWR&R, Chicago . . . Oscar Mayer 
\ Co.. from Wherry, Baker & Tilden, 
to Clinton E. Frank, Chicago . . . 
The National Apple Institute of Wash- 
ington, D. C, to VanSant, Dugdale 
& Co., Baltimore . . . The Chicago 
Dietetic Supply House, with plans to 
use local tv, to Western Advertis- 
ing. Chicago . . . Breuninger Dairies 
of Philadelphia, to Doremus-Eshle- 
man Co., Philadelphia . . . Kahn 
Bros.. Chicago suppliers of Kay-Bee 
brand fertilizers and lawn seed, to 
M. M. Fisher Associates, Chicago 
. . . Moonglow Plastic Jewel Corp., to 
Ritter. Sanford. Price & Chalek, 
New York. 

Merger: Sanger-Funnell. of NeM 
York and McClellan Advertising 

of Massapequa. L. I., with total bill- 
ings at $2 million. Both agencies will 
continue under their present names. 

Name change: Los Angeles-head- 
quartered K. O. Bates Advertising, to 
Bates & West Advertising with 
Harvej West becoming a full part- 
ner . . . Chicago-headquartered Harry 
Atkinson. Inc.. to Atkinson-Coker, 
Inc.. with the upping of William G. 
Coker. 

Thisa 'n' data: Gardner Adver- 
tising is completing its expansion of 
headquarters at 370 Lexington Ave- 
nue. New York . . . BBOO will move 
its Los Angeles office to 5820 Wil- 
shire Blvd. about 1 Max . . . Her- 
bert Strauss. cxecutixe \.|>. at Grey 
\dvertising. honored by the agenc) 
for his 20th anniversary there . . . 
Arnold Varga, creative art super- 
visor at Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, 



66 



SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



Pittsburgh, named Mt Director of 
the Year l>\ the National Societj <d 
Art Directors . . . Reach, McClin- 
(ton & ii*. has sel up a creative 
[hoard i«> review activit) and appl) a 
Icreative viewpoint to anj new cam- 
paigns. 

Tlw\ became v.p.'s : James Gara- 

brant, at Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 
. . . Mien Braun, al North Vdver- 
ti-ini: . . . George Bolas and 
Qiarles Standen, al Tatham-Laird, 



More personnel appointments: 

Bee Kicli. v.p. in charge of media 

at B&B, elected to the hoard of direc- 
tors . . . W ilson Shelton, to crea- 
ti\e director and Frank Snell, to 
business manager of the ereati\e de- 
partment and V.p., of ComptOn . . . 
("barles Howson, to account man- 
ager at MaeManus. John \ Adams 
. Albert Bouchard, to Ted Bates 
as account executive . . . Arthur 
Cloud. Jr.. to Clinton E. Frank, Chi- 

■go, as a radio t\ writer and pro- 
ducer . . . I! mil Leinbeek, to Mogul 
l.euin Williams & Saylor as copy 



l: 1 < > 1 1 [ > head . . . Thomas \reml. to 

assistant directoi "I fibn produi tion 
at Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago 
. . . John Meelian. to research ac- 
count executive al Doremus ^\ ' !o., 

New ^ oik. 



FILM 



Syndication optimism last week 
Id in a number of expansion 
moves finalized with an eye to 
tall opportunities for film. 

Vmong these developments were 
the following: 

• (!BS Films appointed Ralph \l. 
Baruch as international sales director 
for all non-I .S. markets with the ex- 
ception of English-speaking Canada. 

• \T \ put on 1(> new salesmen in 
s\ ndieation 1 see details below ' . 

• Screen Gems divided it- traffic 
depai tment h ith separate opei atioiis 
for national shows undei Man Press 
and syndicated shows under Sid 
\\ liner. 

Sales: /i\ n | .. . 1 1- that Sea Hunt has 
been renewed l"i a second year in 



hi. of it- 18" markets . . . MCAV 

el 1 ' 7 Bold !•• WPIX, N - 
York . . . ITC's 1\ eu ) ork ( onfiden- 
tial sold to Drewrys on WOOD I \ 
y .1 ami Rapids . . . < !inema-\ u< re- 
p.. 1 1- I in opean sales ol th< Pathe 
Musical Pai ade ol Stars pai kag< ... 
I 1 ans-Lux I \ signed feal ure film 
packages t" the following stations: 
\\ IIDII l\. Boston; KLORTV, Sail 
Lake ( itj : KOLD-TV, Tucson; 
\\ DAF-TV, Kansas I it) ; WSJV-TV, 
I Ikhart; KDAL-TV, Duluth; and 

\\T\I. Miami. 

Programs: Screen Gems' latest 
fering intended foi 5) ndieation, / n- 
dercox ei i ar, w ill stai V ii toi Jorj 
. . . CBC and Screen < lems I < anada 

will CO-produce five -ample episodes 

of I'm/ill I at es Life on film ... NTA 
will release an International I'm I, age 
ol feature films containing 51 post- 
1948 features and 13 others, includ- 
ing Shirk) Temple pictures. 

Commercials: FPA and the I nited 
Scenic Artists concluded agreement 
on their labor dispute via federal 
mediation . . . Music Makers reports 




The face that 

launched 

a million sales-. 

GLENCANNON 

From Beer (Olympia) to Bakery 
Products (Holsum), the o re-accepted 
"Oscar"-"Tony"-"Emmy" Award 
Winning face, name and talent of Mr. 
Thomas Mitchell is launching 
sales— big sales for advertisers all 
over the country. As Glencannon, 
in the hilarious half-hour series of 
high comedy on the high seas, 
this beloved character stands ready 
to steer sales your way, too. 
What's more, Thomas Mitchell will 
sell for you personall y, at the 
all-important point of sale. 

NTA Program Sales 

A Division of National Telefilm Associates. Inc., 

Coliseum Tower. 10 Columbus Circle. New York 19. IV 2-7300 



■i 'SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



67 



Our . idvertisers Are 

"SOLD WITH INTEGRITY" 

ON NORTHERN CALIFORNIAS 

FAVORITE STATION 




150TH MARKET IN THE U.S. 



KHSLTV 

CHANNEL 12 

THE GOLDEN EMPIRE STATION 



CHICO, CALIFORNIA 

CBS and ABC Affiliate 

Represented nationally by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 

San Francisco Representative 

CEORCE ROSS, National Sales Manager 

Central Tower Bldg. 



WORL 

Chosen Exclusively 
in BOSTON 

by 




f e<m 



to assure 

the success of its 

National Hi-Fi Club 

in a big 3*A hour weekly 
Sales Campaign!!! 

Here's proof positive 
that when the leaders want 

RESULTS in BOSTON 

ihev choose . . . 



WORL 

BOSTON 

SOW waltt - INDEPENDENT 

Represented nationally by 

HEADIEY-REED CO. 



it created original music for three of 
the nine tv commercials awarded 
prizes by the N. Y. Art Directors 
(Muh. and that in each case the mu- 
sic was created before the commer- 
cials were filmed. 

Trade notes: SMPTE and the Na- 
tional Television Flm Council will co- 
operate in Operation Videofilm, a tv 
film presentation at ABC in New 
York on April 29 . . . An internation- 
al guide to film processing facilities 
is available from Durley Spruill, Cin- 
ema Laboratories, 1226 Wisconsin 
Ave., N.W., Washington 7, D. C, at 
SI for single copies. 

Correction: The April 4 issue of 
FILM-SCOPE incorrectly stated that 
Kellogg did not clear time for Huck- 
leberry Hound in San Francisco and 
Pittsburgh. Time was in fact cleared 
on KTVU and KDKA-TV in these 
cities, with respective ARB ratings, 
which should be added to the 4 April 
chart, of 13.3 and 23.1. 

Strictly personnel: Don Moore 

has been signed as story editor of 
Screen Gems . . . Oliver Unger, 
president of NTA, was slated to ad- 
dress the Broadcast Advertising Club 
of Chicago last week . . . Six new 
officers elected to the NTA executive 
staff included Alan May, v.p. and 
treasurer; Lester Kragman, v.p. of 
advertising and p.r. : Samuel P. 
iNorton, administration v.p.; George 
Gould, tv facilities v.p.; and Bur- 
ton I. Lippman, assistant treasurer- 
secretary . . . Sixteen new NTA syn- 
dication sales executives include R. 
C. "Pete" Maddux and John C. 
Rome, both formerly with the NTA 
network, and the following new ac- 
count personnel: Hal Danson, Perry 
Frank, Jr.. John Gordon. Mi- 
chael J. Gould, Jerry Gruen- 
berg, Albert L. Kolitz. Marvin L. 
Lowe, Joseph J. Madelena. Rob- 
ert L. Meece. Leslie H. Norms, 
Joseph B. Pantell, Joe Porter, 
Dave Schooler, and Ed Stanb. 



NETWORKS 



ABC TV this week asked the 
trade to note that the Mil for 
the period ending I I Vpril gives 
it the largest number of pro- 
gram "firsts" for the 42 evening 
half-hours. 

The iota! 'Tn-is'" for each network: 



ABC TV, 18; CBS TV, 15; NBC TV, 9. 

Network tv sales : P&G i Comp- 
ton), to co-sponsor ABC TV's Donna 
Reed Show for the spring and sum- 
mer months. In fall. Johnson & John- 
son takes over this half . . . General 
Foods (FC&B), for segments of 
Mickey Mouse Club, ABC TV . . . 
NBC TV reports new and renewal 
daytime business totaling $4 mil- 
lion, placed by five advertisers: 
Lever, Brown & \\ illiamson, Armour 
& Co.. Congoleum-Nairn and Tintex. 

Fall sales on network tv: Ply- 
month (Ayer), as full-sponsor of the 
Steve Allen Show, to be aired Mon- 
days, 10-11 p.m. (For comment, see 
SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 19) . . . 
R. J. Reynolds i Esty i for one-min- 
ute participations on ABC TVs 77 
Sunset Strip . . . Brown & Wil- 
liamson i Bates I and Whitehall 
Labs (Bates) for Philip Marlowe, a 
new series bowing on ABC TV Tues- 
day. 29 September, 9:30 p.m 

Gillette (Maxon), renewed for NBC 
TV's Friday night Cavalcade of 
Sports, for 52 weeks . . . Noxzema 
(SSC&B) has taken option with NBC 
I \ foi kill ol Lot e & \l m riaae. 



Ray Ellingsen 



HOTOGRAPHY 




can give 

your 

photographic needs 

the kind of 

attention 

you like 

. . . backed by 

experience 

and artistry! 

Simply call 
DEIaware 7-7249 

or write to 

12 E. Grand Aw. 

Chicago 



C8 



SPONSOR 



25 apiul 1959 



Network programing notes: Hall* 
murk Cards, In*-., lias contracted 
with George Schaefer and his newly- 
formed Compass Productions, Inc., 
to produce (lit- HaU of Fame Beries 
next season . . . Rawhide, effective 
this Frida) I 1 I move- lo an earlier 
time period: 7:30-8 p.m., on CBS I A 
. . . Laramie, new one-hour drama 
series <>!' the old \\ est, is being filmed 

for NBC TV's fall lineup. 

New network affiliations: to CBS 
Radio: \\k\lll. Detroit-Dearborn; 
WKMF, Flint: WKHM, Jackson; 
WSGW, Saginaw; WHLS, Port Hu- 
ron; and WLEW, Bad We. all in 
Michigan (see "Picture Wrap-1 p") 
. . . to ABC Radio, KPEL, Lafayette, 
La. ... to Mutual: K.CON, Portland, 
Ore., and KATR, Corpus Christ i. 

Kudos: To CBS, copping lour out 
of five Sigma Delta Chi Awards for 
Distinguished Service in broadcast 
journalism . . . To INBC. the National 
Safety Council's Public Interest 
Ward for 1958. 

Strictly personnel: James Her- 
gen, appointed director ol NBC Tele- 
Sales, with William Storke succeed- 
ing him as director of participating 
program sales for NBC TV . . . 
Simon Siegal, financial \.|>. and 
treasurer of AB-PT, elected to the 
hoard of directors executive commit- 
tee . . . William Trevarthen, to 
director of tv network operations for 
NBC TV . . . Martin Brown, to as- 
sistant treasurer of AB-PT and v.p. 
and assistant treasurer of ABC . . . 
M. S. Rukeyser, Jr.. to manager, 
business and trade publicity for NBC. 



RADIO STATIONS 



A uvm term in spot radio that's 
catching lire among Liners: 
"hypnotic sell." 

The device — another form of satu- 
ration — was introduced by Chock-Full 
O'Nuts on \\ ABB. Syracuse. It makes 
use of 18 spots within the hour — each 
commercial winding up with the time 
of day. 

Chock-Full O'Nuts. after sales 
went up 200% in Syracuse, extend- 
ed the gimmick to seven other 
markets. 

P.S. : Chicago reps last week tasted 
the impact of the phrase when a cou- 



ple agencies phoned invitations l"i 

I hem to C( >nie in and pick the "h\ p- 

nol ic sell." 



KLIQ, Portland, Ore., took to the 

air llii- month, identify ing i t — » ■ 1 1 as 
"the world's first all news radio 
station." 

I he " \ll New - format, taking 
lour years ol preparation, works this 
u;n: segments covering umlduide 
and local headlines, weather reports, 
articles from magazines read before 
it- publication date, segments from 

European stations. a ■■Listeners 
Roundtable" discussing controversial 
subject-, and so forth. 

Ideas at work: 

• K.YW, Cle\ eland, embarks on 
its ambitious communit) service pro- 
mam this week, dubbed "New Hori- 
zons. The areas to be embraced in 
this service: mental health, safety, 
science, government and history, 
community self-help and culture. In- 
cluded in these projects: bus tours of 
historical sights; sponsored trips to 
atomic and jet installations; a 
"hands-across-t he-sea" arrangement, 
tying in with a Scotland university, 
and a series titled "In Praise of 
Learning." 

• Last week, when the nation's ra- 
dio stations went dead for a half-hour 
as part of a "Conehrad" test of ra- 
dio's potential civil defense use, 
WMCA, New York, carried out its 
regular d.j. show this way: A con- 
test offered as a prize, a visit to the 
winners home by the d.j. whose show 
was cancelled by the test, where, dur- 
ing the silence, he provided an ex- 
clusive program. The winner: Mary 
Phayer, a patient at the Memorial 
(enter for Women. 

• WRAP. Norfolk, Va., put to- 
gether a "Homemakers Council" con- 
sisting of 900 housewives who staged 
the station's second annual exhibit 
for some 3,000 agency people. The 
exhibit: 30 booths of housewive's 
products, including fashion show-, 
hair styles, and the like, all available 
to clients. This Council, along with 
planning the exhibition, has a board 
of directors which plans community 
events. 

• He turned the tables: D.j. Pat 
Landon. on WRCV, Philadelphia. 
pulled a switch to celebrate bis birth- 
day: instead of expecting gifts, he 
nave his sponsors a "Happ) Birth- 



WABC 



/ 70 Radio 



ni 



NEW YORK 



Proudly Adheres 

to the 

Principles 

Set Forth 

in this Seal 




WABC 

The Station with the 
Professional Sound 



SPONSOR 



25 \pril 1959 



69 



day" gift — airing 47 commercials 
free. 

Add daffodils: Ken Manley, d.j. 
on WCSH, Portland, Me., dressed in 
a red polka-dot nightgown, aired his 
show from a bed in the window of a 
furniture company, where he spent 
the night as the outcome of a bet . . . 
Chuck Boyles, WKY, Oklahoma City 
d.j., now claims the official Phone 
Booth Squash Championship of the 
world — with 33 students from the 
city's university crammed into a nor- 
mal size booth outside the station's 
studios. 

Financial reports: Storer Broad- 



casting's net earnings after taxes for 
the first quarter, 1959: $1,024,183 
compared with $751,204 in the cor- 
responding 1958 period. The 1959 
figures include the results of opera- 
tions of WITI-TV, Milwaukee, which 
Storer acquired in December, 1958. 
CBS, Inc., at the annual stock- 
holders meeting, reports the best 
business year of its 31-year history 
and that the first quarter, 1959 was 
the company's best in terms of sales 
and earnings. 

Station purchases: WERC, Erie, 
Pa., to the Cleveland Broadcasting 
Co. (operators of WERE) . . . KTIP, 




WOC-TT 



FOR BEST COVERAGE IN THE 
NATION'S 47th TV MARKET 

(Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island — Moline, Illinois) 

A comparison of coverage of TV stations in or overlap- 
ping the Davenport — Rock Island market area as 
reported in the Nielson Coverage Service No. 3 — 
Spring, 1958. 







Monthly 


Weekly 


Circulation 


Station 


TV Homes 


Coverage 


Daytime 


Nightime 


WOC-TV 


438,480 


308,150 


263,430 


288,750 


Station A 


398,600 


278,900 


226,020 


258,860 


Station B 


340,240 


275,160 


229,710 


260,190 


Station C 


274,990 


208,300 


153,540 


191,010 


Station D 


229,260 


156,340 


127,240 


146,620 



W 


< ol B ) Palmer 
Prciidcnt 

1 rncjl ' Vindcn 


^ 


Pnx Shaffer 

■ li ^Imager 

1'. ten, Griffin, Woodward, 
i rdiuivt Nuirxul 
Rcprcienuiiva 


1 111 i.'l IM (Mils 

DAWNPORT I IOWA 

BhllbNUORf 1 

ROCK ISLAND 1 

MOI.INE III 
l \M MOLINI ' 


channal 



WOC-TV is No. 1 in the 
nation's 47th TV market — lead- 
ing in TV homes (438,480), 
monthly coverage and weekly 
circulation — day and night — 
as reported in the Nielson 
Coverage Service No. 3, Spring, 
1958. For further facts and lat- 
est availabilities, call your PGW 
Colonel . . . NOW! 




WOC-TV Davenport, Iowa is port ot Central 
Broadcasting Co., which also owns and operates 
WHO TV ond WHO Radio. Des Moines, Iowa 



Porterville, Cal., to Gateway Broad- 
casters, Inc. 

Thisa 'n* data: John Hardest}', 

\.|>. and general manager of RAB, 
before the Pittsburgh Radio and Tv 
Club, criticized the "tax examiner- 
minded thinking" of agency ex- 
ecutives. Hardesty's reflection: the 
" I've -got -to -find -something -wrong - 
with-it" attitude strangles radio's 
growth . . . San Francisco State 
College will offer an expanded, com- 
plete program by the radio-tv depart- 
ment starting 22 June. 

Kudos: The Pabst Radio News 
\\\ard, presented by the Pabst Brew- 
ing Co., to WEMP, Milwaukee . . . 
The 1958 Public Interest Award of 
the National Safety Council, to 
KMPC, and KABC, Los Angeles. 

Station staffers: John Metts, elect- 
ed v.p. and secretary of Conn.-N. Y. 
Broadcasters, Inc. . . . Chuck Blore, 
promoted to v.p. in charge of pro- 
graming at KFWB, Los Angeles . . . 
Frank Crane, to v.p. and general 
manager of the Imperial Broadcast- 
ing System . . . Harold Parry, to 
WCKY, Cincinnati as local sales 
manager . . . Jules Corotis, to local 
sales manager of WPEN, Philadel- 
phia . . . Frank Myers, general 
manager of KCMC, Texarkana for 
the past 19 years, has resigned to de- 
vote full time to his newly purchased 
KSIJ, Gladewater, Tex. . . . Robert 
Metcalf, to managing director, 
WPAR, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Deceased: John B. Reynolds, Sr., 
president and general manager of 
Community Broadcasting, Inc., oper- 
ators (ifWKWK. Wheeling. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Adam Young reported this week 
that his effort to get agencies to 
map out what they deem the 
maximum trading area in a mar- 
ket is working out nicely. 

The first 35 agencies that respond- 
ed to Young's questionnaire on the 
subject appeared to agree with the 
trading area definition used by JWT. 

Attached to the questionnaire were 
coverage maps, to which the agencies 
could add or delete counties. 

Objective: Show the stations whal 
advertisers want in composite trading 
arca>. 



70 



SPONSOR 



25 april 1959 




Hands that are gnarled, calloused, 
grease-stained.. ..yet there is a 
touch so highly sensitive, a mind 
so keenly trained that the entire 
key to the machine's effectiveness 
lies here. 

He truly has the "quality touch", 
just as the behind-the-scenes 
hands and minds and hearts guide 
the quality touch of great radio and 
television stations of today! 




radio & television 

d a 1 1 as 



BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS • EDWARD PETRY A COMPANY, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 71 




IN THE f 
MORNING 

(NOV. PULSE-Sg) 

FIRST 

with 

Walter Thurman 



MUSIC 

NEWS 

SERVICE 



PEORIAREA'S TOP 
"MUSIC MAN" 

THURMAN SELLS 

WEEKDAYS 
6:30 AM -10:00 AM 




WMBD 

FIRST! FIRST! FIRST! 

(Nov. Pulse '58) 
... in rhe noontime 
listencrship period 

WMBD 

FIRST! FIRST! FIRST! 

(Nov. Pulse '58) 
... in the late afternoon 
and early evening period 



Exclusive National Representatives 
PETERS, CRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 



PGW has distributed anion*! 
agencies a table showing the 
average temperature by months 
in 74 markets. 

Purpose of the data: So advertis- 
ers can kev their tv schedules broadl) 
to sales-favorable temperatures. 

Attached to the table is a map 
showing weather seasons by "tiers." 

Paying tribute to the secretaries: 

Tomorrow (26) marks the end of 
National Secretaries Week, and to 
highlight it Blair-Tv and Blair Tv 
Associates mailed orchids to "secre- 
taries of men they bombard all year 
with promotion and sales pitches." 

Rep appointments: Adam Young, 
Inc., for WMEX, Boston and WPGC, 
Washington . . . Bob Dore Associ- 
ates for WILD, Boston . . . The 
Meeker Co., for KWIZ, Orange 
County, Cal. ( representation does not 
include Los Angeles) . . . Clarke 
Brown Co., Dallas, for WIBR, Ba- 
ton Rouge; KILE, Galveston, Tex.; 
WAME, Miami; WAPX, Montgom- 
ery, and WJBW, New Orleans. 

More on appointments: Bob 
Dore Associates, for WHAT, Phila- 
delphia . . . Robert E. Eastman & 
Co., for KJR, Seattle; KXL, Port- 
land, Ore. and KNEW, Spokane . . . 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, for 
WRVA, Richmond . . . Forjoe & 
Co. for WBOF, Norfolk . . . John 
E. Pearson Co. for KYES, Rose- 
burg, Ore. . . . Daren F. McGavren 
Co. for WKBZ, Muskegon, Mich. 
. . . B-N-B, Inc. for KWOW, Po- 
mona, Cal. 

Strictly personnel: Lamont L. 
Thompson, to Midwest manager 
and John Stilli, to account execu- 
tive in New York for Tv Advertising 
Reps, Inc. . . . Nina Flinn, to the 
Boiling Co. as assistant to the direc- 
l"i of sales development . . . Frank 
Cason Jr.. tn manager of the At- 
lanta office of llcadley-Reed. 



TV STATIONS 



Spot l> saw a record number of 
restaurants advertising during 
1958, according to TvB. 

Estimated expenditures by restau- 
rant chains in spot l\ hit $359,600 
a 9% increase over 1957 spending, 
ami a 03' < increase o\ er I ' '">< '. 



Another spot tv booster: all- 
purpose liquid detergents — six of 
them investing $14.6 million in 
tv in 1958. a 232 c /c increase over 
1957. 

The spenders: Adell Chemical's 
Lestoil, $12.3 million; Lever's Handy 
Andy, $740,000; Texize Detergent, 
$645,000; P & G's Mr. Clean. S421,- 
300: Colgate's Genie. 8319,800 and 
Bercolene, $114,400. 

Defending tv: John Dille, Jr., 
president of Truth Publishing Co., 

operators of WSJ\ , South Bend-Elk- 
hart. in an editorial on the station 
invited the print media to "poke 
more thoroughly into our programs 
before indicting us as a medium." 

"When a magazine writes off the 
entire medium of tv as "The Light 
That Failed.'" that magazine is guilty 
of less than responsible analysis." 
Dille contended that such publica- 
tions too often will "see the mote in 
tv's eye without being aware of the 
gleam in its own. ' 

Ideas at work: 

• Operation Big Shovel: That's 
the term dubbed by Church Avenue 
merchants of Roanoke, Va., who were 
faced with their street closed for re- 
pavement. The promotion campaign 
was kicked off by 50 tv and 100 radio 
spots via WSLS-AM-TV, with this 
theme: Come see the biggest show in 
Roanoke — watch the street being dug 
up. Results: Merchants did more 
business this past month than a year 
ago, even though the street was com- 
pleteh torn up, and \\ SLS sold 
$3,000 win lit of time during this on- 
the-digging-spot promotion. 

• A whale of a contest: Bozo The 
Clown, via his show on KTLA, Los 
Angeles, held a month-long "name 
the whale" contest, with daih men- 
tion of it drawing some 35,000 en- 
tries Il was climaxed, last week, 
when "Bubbles the Whale" picked a 
name from one of the five finalists — 
\ ia lilt'-|irr»(T\ its tossed to her. 

• Merchandising stunt: KETV. 
Omaha recently held a "Brand-It" 
contest, inviting viewers to identify 
the correel brand name of a product 
after onb the name had been re- 
moved from the container or pack- 
age. Neaib 3,500 entries were sent 
in. with these identified most fre- 
(]uenll\ : Mr. (lean. Campbell's Soup. 
Lipton Tea. Jif peanut butter and 
Raleigh cigarettes. 



72 



SPONSOR 



25 april 1959 






I 



-rfTx, 





J 



Vk> 



m 



m 



u 



You Mean Roanoke's Bigger than Chicago?" 



We do indeed. There are more Virginians in Roa- 
noke than there are in Chicago. 

Which points up a fact of tv life: You can be 

bigger than almost anything it' you look hard 
enough. 

Which brings us to another point: A good hard 
look at the Roanoke market results in its inclu- 
sion on well-planned tv schedules. When that 
happens. WSLS-TV follows automatically. 

At the risk of doing part of Blair's job, witness: 



With full power o\ 316,000 watts on Channel 
10 (and a health) assist from NBC and strong 
local programming), WSLS-TV has welded a 58- 
county area into the greater Roanoke market ol 
420.000 tv homes. 

Come see. Or listen to Blair Television Associates. 

WSLS-TV 

Channel 10 • NBC Television 

Mail Address: Roanoke. Va. 

A broadcast service (with Wsls Radio) 

of Shenandoah Life Insurance c ompan) 



> 



". 






\ 




z 





SOR 









BUT FOR EVERY TIMEBUYER 
THERE ARE TEN OTHER DECISION 
MAKERS BEHIND THE SCENES 
WHO READ SPONSOR AS WELL 



Rarely indeed does one man alone determine when and 
where to place radio or TV business. That's why 
it makes sense to reach every decision maker possible 
with your message because every voice that helps 
to finalize a sale should know your story. 

It's the chief reason your advertising will do so 

well in SPONSOR. SPONSOR reaches almost everybody 

who is anybody in air. All the timebuyers, of course, 

but more decision makers, too, at every level (in 

both the agency/advertiser category) than any 

other broadcast publication. 

Proof? 

Fair enough! 

SPONSOR is the only broadcast publication that 
offers a complete circulation breakdown BY JOB 
CLASSIFICATIONS — listing the exact number of 
subscribers (with their names and titles) at every 
management level. We'll be happy to show it to you 
at your convenience and prove beyond doubt that 
SPONSOR reaches more teams that buy time than any othei 
book in the field. 



PONSOR 



sells the TEAM that buys the 



Industrial Crescent 




A Vast 
Urban Complex 

WORK, EARN 
and SPEND. 

and it's dominated by 

wfmy-tv 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 




OtiC Smcc 1949 

Repreiented by 
Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc. 

New York • Chicago • San Francisco • Atlanta • Bostor 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Station acquisitions: Capital Citits 
Tv Corp., for ownership of WPRO- 
AM-TV, Providence, R. I. . . . Great 
Western Broadcasting Corp., owned 
by J. H. Whitney & Co. of New York, 
for KBET-TA , Sacramento, Cal., 
with Johnston Northrop appointed 
acting general manager of the station. 

Thisa 'n' data: KING-TV, Seattle, 
covered live, for the first time, the 
Washington State Legislature direct 
from Olympia . . . KTTV, Los An- 
geles, which recently expanded its 
daytime programing seven and one- 
half hours weekly, is adding five 
more hours to its schedule. 

Kudos: The Blatz Award for sen ice 
in tv news reporting, to WISN-TV, 
Milwaukee, from the Milwaukee 
Press Club . . . The public service 
award to WNBC-TV and WKNB, 
Hartford, from the Advertising Club 
of Hartford . . . The Public Interest 
Award to the radio and tv division 
of Triangle Publications, from the 
National Safety Council . . . The Sig- 
ma Delta Chi award for outstanding 
work in tv reporting, to WBBM-TV, 
Chicago. ^ 



MEDIA MEN 

{Cont'd from page 33) 
agency seminars for any agency em- 
ploye after hours. These presenta- 
tions are usually turned over to one 
department (media, copy, tv/radio, 
etc.) for an entire evening during 
which they present their staff and 
their story. 

They use a similar technique with 
training programs for newcomers. 
Staffers new to an agency or at a 
lower professional level and still per- 
haps undecided as to the area of 
advertising in which the\ want to 
specialize are exposed to all depart- 
ments and »i\eii an opportunity to 
understand better how the compon- 
ents of the agency relate to each 
other and to the whole. 

Another long-standing and effective 
\\a\ in which account and media 
people meet to solve mutual problems 
is the Informal meeting — the lunch 
oj hull session with a few persons 
concentrating <m ideas which chal- 
lenge them. 

I hese measures "are eliminating 
the glorified clerk concept and giving 
media people much more voice in 
planning strategy." sa\s OMM's Sam 



More listeners cost less 
with 

Billion-Dollar Evansville's 



Because WGBF' 

Delivers • 

DOMINANT f 

COVERAGE \ 

• 88.930 radio homes' 
weekly | 

• 86% of radio homes 
In Its home county, 

Kim 31% of radio: 
omes in 26 add!- ' 
tlonal counties j 

• 57% more radio 
homes weekly than 
the next highest' 
Evansvllle Station; 
Source: NCS :2 ( 




Spot advertising campaigns are enhanced by 
more than 35 years successful programming 
experience, and backed by unequalled mer- 
chandising and marketing support. No wonder 
WGBF is the "buy-word" in the Evansville 
Market! 

National Representatives • Weed Radio Corp 

1280 KC • 5.000 WATTS 

AFFILIATED WITH NBC NETWORK 



m 



«1M 




EVANSVILLE, IK 

"*E GENERATE BUYING 



May Company 
Picks Jacksonville 




Morton D. May. President 
Maj Department Stores Company 

The M.i\ Department Stoics Cora- 
|i.in\ has | > n kid Jacksonville for its 
Firsl stoic in the Southeastern 
l niicil Slates. 1 lu' May Company's 
new store show* their Eaith in the 
State ol Florida's Gateway ( it\ and 
Jacksonville enthusiastically wel- 
comes this new addition to t he 
rapidly expanding North Florida 
economy, 

^llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiillilililllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiliiii:iililllllilllllil| 

AND JACKSONVILLE 

PICKS WFGA-TV 

NBC and ABC Programming 

Represented nationally by 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 

Pi i i ill of a Series) 

^iiiiiliiiiiniiiiiiiiiii 



WFG A — TV 

Channel 12 

Jacksonville, Florida 

FLORIDA'S COLORFUL STATION 



SI'ONSOli 



25 lpril L959 



Fre) . "Media people aren t tools "I 

oilier departments, as - times 

-cciii- to be the case. The) should be 
viewed as competent, responsible 
Die making a contribution to the 



peo] 



d all kinds of 



planning strateg) 
accounts. 

■' Vccount and media sections 
should mesh together, nol push each 
other around," he concludes. 

Bui the agencj media men who 
push their own departments and sen • 
ices to the forefront of agencj activi- 
ty agree on cue limitation: it the 
department isn't a good one and 
doesn't deserve stature, it won 1 get 
it. One media \.p. told SPONSOR: 
"It's just like merchandising any- 
thing. II 5 ou've gol a bad product, 
\ ou'll never sell il big or >»•!! it well 
u iih even the besl campaign. But if 
it's a good product, it need- and de- 
serves good promotion. 

There are ^till some agenc) man- 
agement holdouts who think a media 
man"- place i- over a comptometer. 
But they're dwindling in number as 
the) see the results which other 
agencies are getting b) broadcasting 
the base and the scope of the media 
operation. ^ 



YOGURT 

i ( ont'd from page I 

chased on WIT tl ighout the <\^\ , 

u ith equal emphasis on weekend- as 
< 1 1 j i ing the week. \ strong -ale- force 
efforl was applied simultaneously. 
I he point emphasized in evei ) piece 

of COp) : " \-k for it at \ OUl la\ 01 it'' 

store. 

"\\ ilhin two month-. says I 'an- 

iion president Juan Metzger, oui 
sales have doubled in Philadelphia. 

( )n the lace of it. this ma\ not -eem 

too impressive because thej were 
small to begin with. Bui what i- im- 
portant i" it- is thai the 'ask for it" 
approach has lined up the four chief 
lOod chains in Philadelphia. 

In addition to \M'. h hich accepted 
it- first shipment last week. Dannon 
has distribution via Penn Fruit, food 

Fair, and \eme. Yogurl i- no longer 

the lw odieaded new kid on the Mock 

iii Philadelphia, and -non. according 
to Irwin Zlowe, the radio schedule 
w ill become more pinpointed. 

Dannon has at it- disposal a sure- 
fire method of testing time slots a 
smartly-styled booklet called "Dieting 
to Reduce." The booklel is offered 



on the -tali i time segment to be 

I. -led. and the an-wei i- in USUall) 
in a mallei ol days. 

( in i cut I s ,i total oi 25 spots pei 
week i- runing on \\ < BS, \\ Nl \\ 
WOR, \\ l!< \. WQXR in New York. 
But, hoping foi an ini rease there 
equal to las) yeai - 10' I , the st hedule 
w ill he increased soon, ami two more 

-I. ill. in- a- \ e| lindetet mined will 
he added. 

Basic to I tannon - su< i ess was i 
-w itch in cop) emphasis a lew years 
back, from "Doctors recommend it 
to " \ w ondei Inl -ii.ii k . . . a delicious 
dessei I." I he addition of lla\ ors (th 
latest is pineapple I i- anothei impoi 
i. mi wa\ Dannon has broadened the 
pi oduct's acceptance. I Hetarj ad\ an- 
tages remain a cop) point, loo. 

I hiniion Milk Produi i-. recentl) 
purchased b) Beatrice Foods, i- an 
inde] endenl subsidiai \ under the 
guidance oi Joe Metzger, now .hair- 
man of the hoard and hi- son Irian, 
the company's president. Even with 
its limited distribution, Dannon says 
it accounts for 75' ! of the \ ogurt 
produced in the I . S. It- main com- 
petitors are Yami on the Wesl I oasl 
and lireak-lone in the l.a-t. ^ 



WILLIAM TELL 

WILLIAM TELL PACKS THE BIG SELLING PUNCH! And whatta punch! Socko in Cleveland with audi- 
ence research comments like this: "well acted," "wholesome," "fast- moving," "suspenseful. " 
Socko in Pittsburgh, Houston, and all around the country for such advertisers as Meadow Gold 
Dairy, Fisher Foods, and Lucky 7 Stores. And soon William Tell comes out swinging in 5 new markets 
via the Triangle stations who've just bought into the big excitement. What's more, William Tell 
keeps punching for advertisers with unprecedented merchandising, on-the-air, at-point-of-sale, 
everywhere! And it's all part of the buy... when the buy is "THE ADVENTURES OF WILLIAM TELL" 

'For the full report, contact NTA Research Department 



* 



NTA PROGRAM SALES 

SPONSOR • 2o \PKII. L959 




A DIVISION OF NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES, INC., TEN COLUMBUS CIRCLE, NEW YORK 19. JUDSON 2-7300 






WCTV 



Solves 
Another Problem 

for an account executive 




II 



al was burning. 




The competition copied his 
every move, rode his coattails 
into every market. 




I ree/e cm mil in • > 1 1 1 - -1 <i t i < « 1 1 
bonanza markets such as that 
served by WCTV, suggested 
Blair TV Associates. 




Hal moved fast, got choice time, 
and locked those #*%&*'s out! 




He's less tense; putts better 
now. 



WCTV 



Tallahassee 
Thomasvillc 



for North Fla. and South Ca. 

John II. I'll i /ips 
Broadcasting Stations 



:;; 






Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 




Paul E. Mills has been appointed manag- 
ing director of Storer's WJW, Cleveland. 
A veteran of 25 years' service with West- 
inghouse Broadcasting Co., Mills joins 
Storer from his post as Midwest tv sales 
manager of WBCs Chicago office. Previ- 
ously, he was general manager of WBZ & 
WBZA. Boston. Mills entered broadcast- 
ing in 1932 with WOWO, Ft. Wayne. In 
1934 he helped form, and was made v.p. of. the WOWO-WGL Sales 
Service Corp. In 1944, he managed WOWO sales and promotion. 

Irving Cheskin has been named executive 
director of the Film Producers Assn. of 
N. Y. He has had considerable experience 
in the past with associations and corpora- 
tions as sales executive, consultant and di- 
rector. Most recently, Cheskin served as 
economic consultant for the Ford Founda- 
tion. Fund for the Advancement of Educa- 
tion and International Management Con- 
sultants. He also served as sales administrative manager of Gruen 
Watch Co. and executive secretary of Jewelrj Research Foundation. 








Frank E. Pellegrin, partner, v.p. and tv 
-ales manager of H-R Tv and H-R Reps, 
Inc.. has been nominated for the presidency 
of Radio & Tv Executives Societ). and is 
expected to assume office at its annual busi- 
ne» meeting 13 May. This is the first time 
that a station representative has attained 
the society's presidency. Pellegrin is out- 
going presidenl of Broadcast Pioneers and 
i- completing two years as v.p. of RTES. He has been active in 
radio/tv management, sales and promotion for the past 25 \ears. 

Henry V. Creene, Jr., has been appointed 
sales manager of \\ estinghotise Broadcast- 
ing Co.V KDk \-T\ . Pittsburgh. He comes 
to the station from WBZ-TV. Boston, where 
lie was assistant sales manager. Greene's 
stint at the latter station dale- back to 
L946, when he was account executive. In 
1951 he left lliis- post to become manager 
of the Boston oll.ee of Weed & Co. In L953 
he went to N. Y. as Weed's ft account exec. ; in L 955 he joined For joe, 
V Y. as t\ managing director, and in L956, returned to \\ \Y/.- 1 \ . 




si'ONsoi; 



25 wkii. 1959 




■te^^^^^^^ Recently launched on our 11:30 p.m. Theatre, the M-G-M Golden 

Treasury of Films joins the star-studded firmament of top film enter- 
tainment seen only in WBEN-TV land. 

^m\m I SI l^fl mm I ^^r ^° t ^ ie Western New York star-watchers this adds another good 

reason why "there's more on Channel 4". WBEN-TV Late Night 
Movies offer the most and best in film entertainment. The best 
product from the best studios, all intended to build the best late 
night audience. 



puts another 

great 

film package 

into orbit 



And it's doing the job — as every rating service shows. Our national 
representatives, Harrington, Righter and Parsons, have all the facts 
and figures and will be happy to show you how your product and 
promotion can get top billing in the rich Western New York market 
when you put it up there with the stars on WBEN-TV 11:30 p.m. 
Theatre. 



CH 



WBEN-TV 

CBS in Buffalo 

THE BUFFALO EVENING NEWS STATION 




SPONSOR • 25 APRIL 1959 



7" 



SPONSOR 



Why controversy is healthy 

Dining the past few weeks, sponsor has published a num- 
ber of stories and articles which can only be labeled as "highly 
controversial." 

Among these have been the report on the Agency Single 
Rate Committee, the article titled "The radio industry de- 
serves a spanking," the TvB and our own Commercial Com- 
mentary criticism of the Saturday Evening Post's eight-page 
insert on "apples and oranges," and. in this issue (page 43) 
the Masla proposal for a new spot radio sales organization. 

Each one of these stories raised questions which can pro- 
voke strong arguments on both sides. Each has brought to 
sponsor both praise and criticism. 

If we were a trade publication concerned solely with easy, 
innocuous reporting of industry affairs, it is highly unlikely 
that we would have printed any of this material. 

Bui since its founding 12 years ago, sponsor has taken the 
position that it is the function of a responsible trade paper 
not merel) to inform but to lead, not merely to report but to 
stimulate discussion and constructive thinking about industr) 
problems. 

We believe that this policy will, in the long run. build 
greater health and \itality for the air media than any other. 
\iid that, of course, is our chief concern. 

The need for vigorous debate 

At the same time we want to point out that the value of 
raising controversial issues lies principally in the reactions 
which these issues provoke among our readers. 

If you do nol agree with the points raised in any SPONSOR 
article or story, or il you feel that certain parts of a problem 
demand further amplification, we urge you to write us freely. 

We will do our best to print both sides of every issue that 
bears on a valid air media problem. And we welcome your 
letters, even when the) are in heart) disagreement. 







this we fight for: Greater understand- 
ing ami greatei communication between those 
ulio sell mill those who buy air media. In 
holiest recognition OJ each other's problems 

that it ill huild strength for the whole industry. 









lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Pay-off: In Dallas. Gordon McLen- 
don, president of McLendon Corp. 
and owner of KLIF, lost a friendly 
wager to Lee Segall. president of 
rival station KIXL. To pav. Mc- 
Lendon wrote and personally de- 
livered over KLIF eight promotional 
announcements for KIXL throughout 
one day. Some of the spots were so 
good, that KIXL obtained permission 
from McLendon to use them later on. 
Moral: Only lambs should gambol. 

Ad lib: On NBC TVs new Jimmy 
Rodders Show, they dissolved the 
background while Jimmy sang. Jim- 
nn's song: "The Best Things in Life 
Are Free": upper right in the back- 
ground: one pair of female legs. 

Letdown: Correction to a WNEW- 
TV. New York; program listing — 
KILL: Big Bonanza. 
INSFHT: Pennies From Heaven. 

Critic: Time reports the following 
"For Sale" ad in a \\ est German 
newspaper — "Television set slightlv 
damaged l>\ a blow ol the fist."' 

Hangin' tree: Heard about the art) 
t\ Western where the villain was hung 
with an \scot noose? — Phil Stone, 
CHUM. Toronto. 

Resourceful: John Travieso. news- 
man at W'BAL. Baltimore, left home 
one morning with a full tank of gas 
and a single dime in his pocket, 
headed for bank before going to the 
station. Fnroute. he heard news of a 
train wreck, imested his dime in a 
phone call to \\ BAL, headed for Cit\ 
Hospital to cover the story. Onl\ 
trouble; shortest wa\ to hospital was 
through Harbor Tunnel a toll road. 
I'ravieso thought quickly, left his 
class ring with toll collector as col- 
lateral. Proving an old school ring 
is heller than an old school lie. 



Confusion: On April Fools Da\. 
KIT \ . Seattle, pranked all da) : Gave 
temperature as 85 degrees, collected 
with reports ol ■-now and freezing 
cold; reported a disk jockej had 
jumped out of a plane, landed with 
parachute unopened in Pugel Sound: 
played LP's at I"' r.p.m. ; identified 
.ill iN album music b\ pop or i & i 
titles. Everything for a laugh. 



80 



SPONSOR 



25 vi'iiii. p).v; 




PRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY / BASIC ABC IN PITTSBURGH 




KONO RADIO 

and 

KONO-TV 



take pleasure in annonncin 
the appointment of 

THE KATZ AGENCY, 

as their 

NATIONAL 





REPRESENTATIVE 
EFFECTIVE 

MAY 1, 1959 

Serving Greater San Antonio and Southwest Texas Markets 



i 



a MAY l»S» 
+0« a copy • *• • y*«r 



or — 
I 10 
O < ( 

< 

O -> 

Z CL 

or 

< _l 

J -J O 

U CM 

.JS HE WEEKLY 

o > 



P0N30R 




MAGAZ 



DVERTISERS USE 





IKE FATHER. ..LIKE S£N?... 
ithe Land of Milk and^bney? 

it on your life! In the past 30 years, the 
iconsin "Hayseed" has made way for the 
sl-educated, well-heeled, well-dressed busi- 
er man whose profession is farming. 

: storybook stuff, this market of ours! . . . 
:res of small cities and thousands of big 
iy farms -400,000 TV families. 




WHY DAYTIME 
TELEVISION IS 
SOUL-SEARCHING 

Sales ceiling ma) li«- 
ahead, say nets, hut nem 
formats, more viewei - 
could keep roof off 

Page 31 



Reply to a query— 
what's become 
of Pat Weaver? 

Page 34 

Service shows 
pace the pack 
in local tv 

Page 36 

How Hank brings 
in the bank 
prospects with tv 

Page 44 



DIGEST ON PAGE 





X ^V. .^ f oeacn t 

^HBIATION 

50,000 WATTS at 540 KC 



RADIO 

CYPRESS GARDENS 

FLORIDA 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD RETRY & CO., INC. 





: from the start, MEDIC in syndication sewed up its 
period on a once-a-week basis. After 2 prize-winning 
Drk years it leads in market after market, coast-to-coast. 

luestion remained— could MEDIC operate successfully 
s-the-board? The answer is now at hand: 

station Miami, MEDIC beat all 7:00 p.m. Monday com- 
on for ten straight months, with a 50' %. ARB average 
. This February, WTVJ moved it to 1:00 p.m., Monday 
gh Friday. Now MEDIC, in its third run, outstrips its 
etition all week long with a 56'; share-of- audience— 



an increase of 51'; over the program formerly in that slot! 
In 4-station San Francisco, KRON-TV plays MEDIC across- 
the-board at 9:00 a.m. Again, it tops its time-period, its 
41'; share more than doubling that of the show it replaced! 

Atlanta, Las Vegas, Texarkana— small market and large— 
MEDIC is making its mark across-the-board. It began the 
Monday-through-Friday run on WJZ-TV in Baltimore 
April 13. And Philadelphia's WFIL-TV has signed to start 
it six times a week. 

The operation's a success. Now let's get down to cases with you .' 



VICTORY PROGRAM 




VJIVISION OF CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. • Canadian Representative: Fremantle of Canada. Ltd. 



© Vol. 13, No. ># • 2 May 1959 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Why daytime tv is soul-searching 

31 Industry experts report on what happened during this first year of day- 
time tv on all 3 nets; what agencies, clients and audience can expect 

Pity Poor Pat 

34 SPONSOR answers intra-industry queries as to what's become of the color- 
ful Pat Weaver, tells how he functions as a $200,000 per year consultant 

FCC wants to chop option time 

36 Among five proposed changes is one that would whittle from three to two 
and one-half hours of total time within each segment of broadcast day 

What admen look for in local tv programing 

36 Fourth study of timebuyer opinions by NBC Spot Sales show the healthy 
respect for non-network video, especially used, weather, spot shows 

The best radio pitch I ever heard 

38 What makes a good radio station presentation? Not length, for this 
dramatic one took less than a half hour, resulted in over 150,000 sale 

Why a food chain switched from tv to radio 

40 Addition of new outlets required broader, less costly coverage in diffuse 
So. Cal. area, su 21-store McDaniel chain revamped its ad strategy 

65 radio stations make joint pitch to buyers 

41 Five-year study of timebuyer's needs leads Art Moore & Assoc, rep firm 
to compile market, sales data for 65 radio stations in new buying guide 

PCW's Mr. Thinkbigly's 3 reasons for tv spot 

42 Rep firm develops new "grass roots" presentation aimed to tell spol 1\ 
story to sales executives, district managers, brokers, wholesalers, etc. 

Bank uses tv to widen its appeal 

44 With one of its executives as spokesman, Wheeling bank aims sports, 
news, family formal at depositors, small loan prospects, businessmen 

sponsor asks: How do you determine 
a station's buying price? 

54 With station worth steadily rising in both major and minor markets, 
station men and a broker tell their yardsticks in station appraisal 



FEATURES 

56 Film-Scope 

26 19th and Madison 

64- News & Idea Wrap-Up 

4 Newsmaker of the Week 

64 Picture Wrap-Up 
62 Radio Resulu 
12 Sponsor Backstage 



60 Sponsor Hears 
17 Sponsor-Scope 
80 Sponsor Speaks 
27 Spot Buys 
80 Teii-Second Spots 

8 Timebuyers at Work 
78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
57 Wa-hiiigiiin Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodoc 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 
Contributing Editor 
<<>e Csida 
Art Editor 
Mauvy Kurtz 
Production Editor 
Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Viskniskki. Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiqqins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 
James H. Fuller 
VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Rov Meachum 
Eastern Manager 
Robert Brokaw 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 
Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mqr. 

George Becker; Charles Eckert; Gilda 

Gomez: Priscilla Hoffman; Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



inaa 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $8 a year. Canada & 
other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a year. 
Other Foreign Countries $11 per year. Single 
copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all cor- 
respondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y 
MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by SPON- 
SOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at 
Baltimore. Md. 

Ol959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 




RNIA (*nd W.tt.rn N.v.d.) 



BEELINE 

RADIO 

Long famed as the nation's leading agri- 
cultural market, the Inland Valley of Cali- 
fornia has recently grown as an industrial 
center. Thousands of new families, earning 
new millions of dollars have added to the 
economic strength of this already -rich 
market. For example, effective buying in- 
come is more than Maine, Vermont and 
New Hampshire*. And, all through this 
area, hundreds of thousands of people are 
buying the products they hear about on 
Beeline radio. Shouldn't your message be 
there? 

As a group, the Beeline stations give 
you more radio homes than any combina- 
tion of competitors . . . 
at by far the lowest 
cost per thousand. 
(Nielsen & SR&D) 



'Sales Management's 1958 
Survey of Buying Power 





KFBKo 



KBEE ° MODESTO 

KMJo'oesno. 
^ \ 




**& 



Static firing test of a rocket engine at Aeroj 



fUte&odbcUAf EZ/iGadcastiMi Co**tf>a/***f 



SACRAMENTO. CALIFORNIA 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO.. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



SPONSOR • 2 MAY L959 



"We don't just 
enunciate . . . 
we activate!" 



says 

JACK HAYWARD 

WPDQ 
CHIEF ANNOUNCER 




"Certainly we want strong voices with 
the ring of authority, but the voice that 
sells is more important to us than the 
pear-shaped tone. 

If it takes hard sell, we use it. If it takes 
the soft approach, we use that. We don't 
talk at all unless we can say something 
important or something interesting. 

One other thing. We take a personal 
interest in our accounts. The announcing 
staff makes frequent visits to stores, 
dealers, brokers and distributors. We 
usually know the client's sales force and 
its problems. We make it a point to 
know our client's products — and use 
them whenever possible. This personal 
activity makes our selling team a part 
of the client's sales force and results in 
sincere presentation and greater sales 
results. 

We like to feel this is another reason 
why WPDQ has stayed on top so long, 
and continues to be the first choice of 
more and more advartisers in the fabu- 
lous Jacksonville market!" 



U(X^C^4^^J^C^t^^^^ 



ccu-^l 



Represented by 
Venard, Rintoul and McConnell 
James S. Ayers, Southeast 



5000 Watts 



600 KC 



WPDQ 

Robert R. Feagin, Pres. & Gen'l. Mgr. 

Where alert listeners tune by choice, 
not by chance .... 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



As Oregon's Centennial ivagon train rolls sloivly down a 
century-old trail from Independence, Ore., to Independence, 
Mo., it's apparent that there are still plenty of nimble, pro- 
motional-minded showmen in radio. Exclusive radio cover- 
age of this symbolic trek was snared by the imaginative 
general manager of the Morthivest Mugget Stations group. 

The newsmaker: Les Smith, the native New Yorker who 
began his broadcast career as a page hoy at NBC. picked off ex- 
clusive rights to radio coverage of the wagon train as neatly as any 
earlv Indian scout ever picked off a marauding Sioux. The covered 
wagons creaking eastward in a reverse of the old Overland Route 
dramatize the 100th anniversary of Oregon's admission into the 
Union while Smith's promotion of it via radio dramatizes area mar- 
keting changes. 

The Pacific Northwest has grown from a region devoted almost 
entirely to lumbering and agricul- 
ture to a rich manufacturing cen- 
ter housing some of the largest 
industrial companies in the coun- 
try Where farms stood before, 
homes, roads, schools and modern 
shopping centers now dot the land- 
scape. It is a completely different 
picture from the Northwest of a 
century ago. 

What has happened in the Pa- 
cific Northwest is what has hap- 
pened across the continent — a de- 
centralization of industry that is 
changing not only the markets but also the marketing approaches. 
Along with the shifting patterns of markets, have come shifting 
trends in population as a result of an agrarian economy turned in- 
dustrial. As an example the Boeing Aircraft plant in Seattle cm- 
ploys some 70.000 people. 

That radio has come into the act of promoting this celebration of 
an era of progress is an art of imagination on the part of Smith. 

After his entrance in the air media field via NBC, he continued 
his broadcasting career until it was interrupted b) World War II. in 
which he served as a major in the U. S. Army. 

Vfter the war. he went to San Francisco, and 1>\ the middle I950's, 

had acquired controlling interests in KJR, Seattle. KNEW, Spokane 
and KM,. Portland. Several years ago he sold out his interests but 
has remained as general manager of this broadcasting chain which is 
now known as the Northwest Nugget Group. Station KNL just 
received a "><> kw grant two weeks ago. ^ 




Les Sriijh 



SPONSOR 



2 MAY 10.V) 



iWSMAKER STATION OF THE WEEK 






EADS THE LIST 

IN RADIO 

ERSONALITIES IN 
IEWS REPORTING 

IN BALANCED 
ROGRAMMING 
'ULSE HOOPER 

TRENDEX 
vLL ACKNOWLEDGE 
TS AMAZING GROWTH! 





UY Radio when you buy media BUV Balaban 
/hen you buy radio BUY KBOX when you 
uy Dallas and you BUY the people who BUY 

HE BALABAN STATIONS 

in tempo with the times 
Wit. KBOX WRIT 

St. Louis Dallas Milwaukee 

JOHN F. BOX, Jr., Managing Director 
EDWARD T. HUNT, General Mgr, 

old Nationally By Robert E.Eastman & Co., Inc. 





It's this. Measured in terms of ratings, efficiency, programming, audience composition 
6 sponsor • 2 m\v 1959 




ik 7 think they're trying 



to tell us something." 



>r sales successes, the top network buy is now Abv tLtVldlUll 



sponsor • 2 M \v L959 



Raleigh-Durham 
the Nation's 




Radio Market 

has Greater 

FILLING 

STATION 
SALES 

than the 6th 

Metropolitan 

Market 




28th Radio Market - WPTF 
$233,368,000 

28th Metropolitan Market 
$51,533,000 

6th Metropolitan Market 
$196,008,000 










Timebuyers 
at work 



Joel Davis, Benton & Bowles, Inc., New York, thinks that buyers 
should not overlook the possibility of sponsoring swidicated pro- 
grams when seeking local weight in one or more markets. "Naturally, 
individual marketing and product requirements would determine the 
feasibility of syndicated program sponsorship.'" Joel says. "But if 
these considerations are favorable, 
there are many plus factors that 
can make a syndicated show a 
good buy. No. 1, program spon- 
sorship offers important prestige. 
No. 2, it is a means of obtain- 
ing one-minute announcements in 
prime time. No. 3, it provides 
both strong consumer and trade 
merchandisability through the pro- 
gram-product identification." Joel 
also feels sponsorship is useful as 
program weight in selected mar- 
kets when faced with network clearance problems or when extra com- 
mercial weight is necessary. "It's eas\ . Joel savs. "to "follow the 
crowd' and recommend spot purchase in a given situation, but if 
possible, sponsorship can be a tremendous competitive advantage. 




Bill Reese, Friend-Reiss Advertising, Inc. New \ork. radio t\ direc- 
tor, feels that more tv stations and representatives should provide 
facts as to costs for the placement of live-tags with the names of local 
retail outlets. "In mam cases, especially where voice-overs are 
called for. there is no wa\ for the agenc) buyer to know in advance 

if there are to be charges l»\ the 
station for the use of a staff an- 
nouncer, a live camera if needed, 
pi oduction charges, etc. Sometimes 
the reps saj "small charge." with- 
out being specific. Becau-c oi 
these practices, Bill sa\s. it is diffi- 
cult for the agencj to give the cli- 
ent a complete, final budget pic- 
ture. Consequently, the agencj 
must "lien return to the client w ith 
additional charges after the cam- 
paign has started. " \ll reps should 
have the local talent and announcer Eees, if any, available in time for 
the agency to submit them with the total budget, lime and again, by 
the time a rep contacts a local station, and uct~ back to the agency, a 
week or moil' has gone bj creating an unnecessary budget problem."' 




SPONSOR 



2 M \1 



1 959 




Greatest food 



merchandiser 

in America! 



Buy 



Tom Tinsley 

President 

R. C. Embry 

Vice Pres. 



Baltimore supermarkets and corner groceries . . . Baltimore chains and 
independents . . . W-I-T-H delivers them all to you with the most powerful 
assortment of food promotions ever created by a radio station. Here's the 
"merchandising muscle" W-I-T-H will give your grocery product over a 
13-week period. 

# W-I-T-H Feature Foods Merchandising Service. You get all this: 

1. A minimum of 60 store calls in high volume groceries, including 
point-of-purchase merchandising such as increasing shelf exposure, 
restocking shelves and installing displays for your product. 

2. A minimum of 20 special one-week displays. 

3. 20 days of Bargain Bar promotions in chains and supermarkets, plus 
additional merchandising by demonstration, sampling, couponing, etc. 

4. Complete merchandising reports issued to you twice each 13 weeks. 

# W-I-T-H Chain Store Food Plan, providing for dump, end-of-aisle and 
shelf extender displays in leading chain stores. 

# W-I-T-H Weekly Merchandising Service with independent GA Stores. 

# W-I-T-H Community Club Awards, now in its 13th successful cycle. 

# PLUS merchandising letters . . . PLUS trade paper advertising of your 
product . . . PLUS potent advertising material for your own salesmen's kits 
. . . PLUS personal supervision by head of W-I-T-H Merchandising Dept. 
Add W-I-T-H 's low, low rates and W-I-T-H's complete coverage of Balti- 
more's 15-mile radius . . . and you've got the station that delivers the groceries! 







in Baltimore 



\ National Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 

Representatives: Clarke Brown Co. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, New Orleans. 

Daren F. McGavren Co. in Chicago, Boston, Detroit and on West Coast. 

Ohio Stations Representatives in the state of Ohio. 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 



llimlmi 



There's WUA I in -Jacksonville, where the most 
desirable figures are displayed in business ledgers! Only WJXT 

puts you in the swim of this booming regional center . . . 
66 counties in Northeast Florida and South Georgia, well over twice the 
counties covered by the other station according to NCS No. 3. 
With 38 of the top 40 shows (and all ten top local shows) 
WJXT boasts rating leads generally between 
a one-sided 70% evenings and mornings and a deadly 90% 
afternoons. In every category which advertisers use to judge 

leadership, simple arithmetic 

proves there's more, much more to WJXT 






b FWft... 







WJXT0 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

An affiliate of the CBS Television Network 
Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 



Operated by The Washington Post Broadcast Division: 

WJXT Channel 4, Jacksonville. Florida WTOP Radio Washington, DC. W 'TOP -TV Channel 9, Washington. D .( 



Right on top 
in FRESNO 




^■viewership 
leads the other 
two network 
stations 6 nights 
out of 7. And ac- 
tually costs 14% 
anil 15°o less per 
minute spot night- 
times than the two 
others besides! 



KJEO- Channel 47, No. 1 
Cor the money, No. I for the 
Ontral California audience. 





% 




© 



channel 

FRESNO 

I. E. O'Neill -President 
Joe Drilling —Vice President 

and General Manager 
W. 0. Edholm — Sales Manager 



See your II -R representative. 



H'R-tf# 



12 



by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 




Nielsen X Trendex = sponsor rating 

Today as the three television networks shape 
up their fall programing in the most successful 
surge of sales seen in many a year, sponsors and 
their agencies continue the eternal search for the 
ideal video vehicle. And ratings and total audi- 
ence, it becomes increasingly clear, are only part 
of the answer. 

One of the most recent and most interesting 
studies in the area of attempting to determine the true value of tele- 
vision shows to the sponsor is that made by Norman, Craig & Kum- 
mel. NCK took Nielsen total audience figures and multiplied them 
h\ Trendex sponsor identification figures to arrive at what might be 
called a Sponsor Rating. They did this with 103 nighttime network 
shows for the last half of 1958. And the findings are fascinating: 

The 10 top shows by this standard of reckoning were: ill Lau- 
rence If elk Dancing Party; (2) The Ed Sullivan Shoiv; (3) I've Got 
a Secret; (4) The Dinah Shore Chevy Show; (5) The Jack Benny 
Show; (6) The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show; (7) the General Electric 
Theatre; (8) Lassie; (9) The Price Is Right, and (10) The Perry 
Corno Show. 

Where did the Western go? 

Two glaring facts are immediately apparent. First, four out of 
this top 10 are variety shows featuring musical personalities I, one 
bandleader and three singers!, and a fifth I the Ed Sullivan Show) 
is a variety show which leans heavilj on music. And secondly, not a 
single western, crime show or other bang-bang-you're-dead epic, no 
matter how high its audience rating makes the select circle on the 
sponsor rating basis. 

If this top 10 may be used as a criterion, it also demonstrates that 
big budgets are not necessarily the answer to presenting a television 
show that will do the job for the advertiser. Seven of the shows are 
hroiighl in at an\ where from about $35,000 to about $50,000 per 
stanza. These are: Eve Got a Secret, $35,000; Price Is Right, $37,500; 
Lawrence Welk, $42,000; Lassie, $ 15.000: G.E. Theatre. $50,000; 
Tennessee Ernie Ford, $50,000: Jack Benny, $55,000. And the other 
three range from SIIO.IHKI for the Sullivan show to about $125,000 
each for Dinah's and Perry's extravaganzas. I All figures are approxi- 
mate, of course.) 

Of the top 10, network-wise, for what it's worth, CBS has five, NBC 
four and ABC one. And (projecting them to their new fall season 
dates) five of the shows are Sundaj pro-rams, three Wednesdays, 
one Saturday and one Thursday , 

Onlj one advertiser is sharp and lucky enough to have come up 
with two of these lOers. That's Lexer Bros., who bankroll Benny and 
(Please turn to page 25) 



SI'ONSOH 



2 mw 1959 






( 



I 






> those who live on air. . . 




In the last three decades advertisers and their agencies 
have spent billions ol dollars on air. A lot of people 
lived on it. A lot of goods were moved. 



To those who live on air SPONSOR serves a function 
no other publication can match, for SPONSOR is 
the most definitive study of air in the broadcast in- 
dustry. It is the news of air— the plans of air— the 
progress of air— the thoughts of air— the very life of 
air— delivered to you every week — 52 weeks a year. 

Most every man who's gotten anywhere in air reads 
SPONSOR. The man who wants to get there faster 
reads SPONSOR at home— because the very chem- 
istry of broadcasting— the factors that make it move 



and earn its salt are just much too important for 
light reading on a routing list. 

If you live on air — read SPONSOR at home. Read 
it on A time, B time or C time but make sure it's 
free time at home. At the price ol onl) ~> s a yeai you 
can have 52 issues ol this mosi useful publication in 
the field at your side — to sec. study, tear out AnA file. 
It's the best investment you'll ever make. Order your 
home subscription toda) . 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



IN MARKET AFTER MARKET AFTER MARK 






JEFF'S COLLIE 



@ lemie Progromi, Inc. 1959 



the sponsor's best friend 



LASSIE 

is still 

outstripping all competition 

in its sixth 

record-breaking year 

on the network. 

As JEFF'S COLLIE, it is 

the best friend too 
of the local sponsor. 

Now the SECOND YEAR 
of JEFF'S COLLIE 
is available locally. 

For your market, 

wire or phone collect today. 




INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 



488 MADISON AVENUE • NEW YORK 22 • PLAZA 5-2100 



including television stations: 



Capital 
Cities 
Television 
Corp. 

announces 
the opening 
of 



W-TEN CHANNEL 10 

Albany — Troy — Schenectady 



WTVD 



CHANNEL 11 



Raleigh — Durham 



WPRO-TV 



Providence 



CHANNEL 12 



and radio stations: 



WROW 



590 Kc. 



Albany — Troy — Schenectady 



WPRO 



Providence 



620 Kc. 



NEW YORK HEADQUARTERS 

65 EAST 55TH /L, I 

PLAZA 2-1750 ^M-wc^l- 




>L 



PRESIDENT 



16 



sponsor • 2 may L959 



\1o\t significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 




SPONSOR-SCOPE 



2 MAY 1959 Veteran agency Iv executives feel thai the process of buying network tv has 

copyright io'<> never been so hectic, bewildering, and frustrating as this spring. 

sponsor Negotiating for time or programs, they complain, has become anything but a process gov- 

publications inc. erned by a set of clearly understood ground rules. 

In a scramble for desirable location, agencies have been ordering time periods 
subject to the client's acceptance of the program; meantime sellers have been taking or- 
ders hand over fist. 

The result: Many periods of the networks are under several layers of orders, 
and bidding agencies have become panicky that they won't be able to deliver to clients the 
choice time periods and programs. 

A common prediction: More than one network eventually may find itself hold- 
ing a fistful of unexercised options, because in the meantime buys have been made else- 
where. In other words, some of the balloons may burst disastrously. 



The biggest hunk of new national spot tv money rearing its head out of New 
York this week was Boyle-Midway's Black Flag Insecticide via J. Walter Thompson. 

There'll be 28 markets, scattered along the Atlantic Seaboard and South, plus St. Louis. 
Schedules call for 17 weeks. 

Other new tv spot activity includes: Pillsbury eakemixes (Burnett), looking for 
availabilities in about 60 markets for a four-week campaign: Continental Casualty (George 
Hartman, Chicago), minutes and I.D.s in about a dozen markets; North Woods coffee 
(Clinton E. Frank), making its debut in the medium; Miller Brewing (Mathisson, Mil- 
waukee), a limited number of markets for a six-to-eight-week run. 

P.S.: Brown & Williamson will most likely put the $2.25 million saved from the 
cancellation of the Texan (CBS) into tv spot. 



It doesn't look as though 7-Up will return to network tv on a regidar basis. 

There's a good chance that it will put its air media money (via JWT, Chicago) into six 
to eight brief participations in open nighttime network tv shows and flights of 
radio spot. 

(Not likely to be included in the radio campaign is the gag commercial which the 
FBI didn't think conformed with its own sense of dignity. The FBI objected to this 
line in the dialog: "Thank vou. Kim Schultz (the object of a comedy interview), we'll be see- 
ing you in your latest picture, 'I Was a Remarkably Terrific Teen-ajrer for the FBI'.'') 



Reps are beginning to wonder how much of the spot pie will be affected by the 
plans of the tv networks to make certain nighttime programs available for minute 
participations this fall. 

NBC TV already is pitching a triple-impact plan — a minute in three different shows 
during the week. CBS TV will take minutes for at least two of its early evening shows. 
What happens in that regard at \BC TV will depend on what's left open after the sale of 
the larger units has simmered down. 

Meantime media directors in some of the big tv agencies predict: If the economy re- 
mains as healthy as now. there'll be enough spot business, regardless, to give tv sta- 
tions their most prosperous season. 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 



17 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

National spot radio went on an availability search this week in behalf of DeSoto 
(BBDO) and Sun Oil (Esty). 

DeSoto says it prefers five-minute news. 

Radio stations may well he hearing via their reps one of these days from an 
agency that has proposed something different in spot concepts to one of its national 
accounts. 

Schedules would be for 52 weeks; and the frequency would consist of two one-min- 
ute commercials morning, noon, and night. 

But this environment would he required: (1) a minute of music before the first 
commercial; (2) three minutes of music following the first commercial; (3) insertion of 
t lie second commercial; and (4) a minute of music to follow. 

You can visualize the growing demand for minutes in late tv fringe time better 
when you note what's happened to the percentage of set tune-in, particularly in the rich 
Northeast and Pacific regions. 

Here's a comparison of late tv set operation (1959 vs. 1956) as culled from the Niel- 
sen Television Index for January -February of last year: 

LOCAL TIME NORTHEAST PACIFIC WEST CENTRAL 

1959 1956 1959 1956 1959 1956 



1 1 p. iii. -12 urn 


31.8 


28.9 


20.6 


17.8 


24.5 


24.9 


12 mn-1 a.m. 


L9.3 


15.4 


8.1 


6.0 


7.1 


7.2 


1 a.m. -2 a.m. 


7.3 


4.1 


1.9 


1.0 


1.6 


1.5 


2 a.m.-3 a.m. 


3.1 


1.0 


1.3 


0.3 


0.3 


0.1 



Note: The comparison, obviously, deals with the span in which quality film features 
became the dominant ingredient of late night programing. 

The demand and supply of tv spots in fringe time is beginning to have its economic 
repercussions: more and more stations are thinking of selling them at a flat rate. 

Reasons for eliminating the frequency discount for the late movie participations: 
(1) simplify the bookkeeping, and (2) avoid the necessity of rate raising. 

CBS TV apparently is going to go slow in converting more daytime chain- 
breaks into minutes this fall. 

The network, which several months ago set up a couple such chainbreaks because affiliates 
faced a rising demand for minute spots, wants to research first how these spots are heing 
used. 

Reason behind the inquiry: P&G via Compton has complained that the minute 
break following one of its half hours is being sold by the affiliates in smaller than min- 
ute units, thereby depreciating the value of its network commercials. 

CBS meantime points out that all it can do is remind affiliates that advertisers had 
jigreed to the longer break because they thought it would be sold for minute com- 
mercials only. 

Clients, Madison Avenue accountmen Bay, arc showing an increasing inquisitiveness 
about where the money goes when they buy a network film series. 

One major tv agency already has provided its account side with an answer, of sorts, in 
memo form. 

The memo points out that as a rule first showing of a film on a network merely cov- 
ers the cost of the production to the producer, and that he looks to the subsequent runs 
for his profit. Hence there can't be much fat in a network sale. 

Also brought to the client's attention: Where prices have taken a hike this season, 
they usually include rights to a second use. 

18 SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continatd 



The cult of the iv special hai saturated BBPO *o widely dial the Bgencj u shop- 
ping for four specials to be included in U.S. Steel's tv program schedule next season. 

Tlic Buper-dupera will be housed within Steel's alternate CBS TV Wednesday 10-11 p.m. 
period, which apparently means there'll be fewer Theatre Guild contributions. 

Tv network sales departments rate certain agencies as "opportunity' 1 shoppers. 

Tliov have a special knack for moving fast when an extra-attractive buy become* 
available and get a quirk decision from a client. 

Agencies in this class include: Bates. Burnett, PFS, SSCB, and Grey. 

Recognized as the kev to such flexibility: A client setup where one or two people 
can make a quick decision on the agency's recommendations. 

Revlon makes the latest major user of tv to join the specials parade. 

This week it closed a $3.5 million lime deal with CBS TV for the fall. There'll he 
20 specials altogether. 15 of them to he spotted in the Playhouse 90 period and the remain- 
der, each an hour long, will he spread around the CBS schedule. 

The shows, likely to cost another 3.5 million, will he produced by Goodman Ace, 
which removes him from the Perry Como package. 

Bv this transaction Revlon embarks upon what appears to he a new policy of tv leverage 
for itself: specials for the big impact, and lots of spot money to fill in the valleys. 

Meantime it's got ahout $150,000 a week to expend in tv during the summer. 

The five leading cigarette companies may wind up in network tv this fall with 
a collective sponsorship of between 50-55 commercial minutes per week. 

What this would mean in terms of hillings on the hasis of $30,000 for time and talent 
per commercial minute over the season: between $78-86 million. 

Currently, the hoxscore for the numher of commercial minutes that each cigarette manu- 
facturer has under commitment bv network per week looks like this: 



COMPANY 


ARC TV 


CBS TV 


NBC tv 


TOTAT. 


Liggett & Myers 


7% 


3 


IV. 


12 


Reynolds 


4 


1i'. 


3 


11% 


American Tobacco 





iy 2 


7V. 





Lorillard 


4l/ 2 


3 


V. 


9 


Brown & Williamson 


11/, 


iy 2 





6 


Total 


20i$ 


13i/> 


I314 


471/> 



Note: American Tobacco is expected to use up a goodly portion of the money no longer 
in Jack Benny. Hit Parade, and Trackdown; Reynolds will pick up another show; and L&M 
and Lorillard are each holding several network options. 

ABC TV will be selling six quarter-hours still open in the 5:30-6 p.m. strip, 
which General Mills will control this fall, at $18,000 per quarter-hour. 

General Mills has obligated itself for four of the quarter-hours a week ("this will he in- 
creased to five in the event the network doesn't have a sellout). 

The entire period will be programed by General Mills with episodes of Rin Tin 
Tin, Flicka, and an original cartoon series (Rocky and His Friends) to be turned out by 
Producers Associates of Television, creator f Crusader Rabbit. 

The offbeat side of the deal between General Mills and PAT: Tf all the options for the 
cartoons are carried out over the next five years, the Minneapolis giant becomes the lone 
owner of the negatives. PAT. however, will retain all foreign and merchandising 
rights. The estimate five-year investment for Rockv: |7.5 million. 

Whv General Mills is bent <m the ownership angle: It could have owned the Lone 
Ranger and made a separate fortune out of it. hut let that one slip by. 

DFS contrived the programing and time deals. 

SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 19 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

General Motors has recruited its tv coordinator from the soap field: Gale Smith, 

who used to supervise programing for P&G, will fill that newly created job under W. F. 
Hufstadter, GM v.p. in charge of distribution. 

Hufstadter had offered the post to A. N. Halverstadt, P&G's manager of advertis- 
ing, and Halverstadt, in turning it down, recommended Smith. 

Obviously, Hufstadter's conception of what his company needs changed during the course 
of the search. His original inquiry had hecn among industry figures who had been 
closely identified with expensive prestige tv programing. 

Madison Avenue appeared to ahsorh with equanamity last week the news that 
the FCC was setting itself for another onslaught this summer against network tv op- 
tion time. 

The general reaction was that any change in the rules would be quite slow in taking 
effect. And anyway the agencies had more immediate fish to fry: getting their tv needs 
set for the coming season. 

(Sec also article on page 36; and Washington Week, page 57.) 

Equitable Assurance (FCB) is still in the market for a scries that will introduce 
it to tv network bigtime. 

Negotiations for a monthly Biographv idea washed out because the insurance mm- 
panv differed with CBS TV about the show's basic formula. 

Acting in behalf of P&G, Compton is again on the warpath about network sta- 
tions clipping off bits of P&G shows to make room for spot announcements. 

The agency will meet this week and next with the tv networks to insist that (1) a bet- 
ter policing job be done, and (2) affiliate poachers be penalized. 

At the suggestion of advertiser-agencies clients and some magazine publishers, 
Nielsen is exploring the possibility of turning out a periodic print media evalua- 
tion a la the tv index. 

Initial step: experiment with applicable research techniques. 

Tv can outmatch with ease the cost of the 36-page one-time shot for Ford in 
Reader's Digest (the magazine quotes $750,000). 

Here are just five single shots in tv that exceeded the RD bonanza: General Motor's 
50th Anniversary. $1,100,000: Standard Oil of New Jersey's 75th Anniversary. $990.- 
000; the combined Electric Industries show. $950,000; Ford's 50 Anniversary. $850.- 
000; and the Rinp; Crosby-Edsel introduction, $775,000. 

The tv networks look for daytime buying to take on some tempo as soon as 
national advertisers have locked up their nighttime requirements. 

Even though there's been a shift in rating expectations as the result of ABC TV's expan- 
sion of daytime, the networks figure that the growth of daytime will be actuated by 
the advertiser's continued acceptance of it as a meat and potatoes operation and a 
sound supplement to nighttime tv. Frequency, of course, is a big attraction. 

(See page 31 for an analysis of the tv daytime outlook.) 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
Spot Buys, page 52, News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 64: Washington Week, page 57: sponsor 
Hears, page 60: Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 58. 

20 SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 




— CXa^v 



vwxx. 







jdtl 



^e^lc^ dcr UwU^ 



EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



•THANK YOU. JULIETTE M^t.F.N' 



SPONSOR • 2 MAY 195" 



21 



V 




The George Foster Peabody Award 
presented to "The Blue Fairy". 
WGN-TV, as the nation's outstanding 
program (or children during Ifl-'iS. 




WGN-TV- r 
only TV station 

to win a 
Peabody award 
in 1958! 







1 he citation reads: "An imaginative and enchanting series, which, through live 
acting, puppetry and narrative, brings to magic reality the most enduring of 
children's stories. It is noteworthy that, despite nominations of network programs, 
this award goes to a program series telecast live and in color by an independent 
station in Chicago— WGN-TV." 

WGN-TV is proud to have won this award. Its winning adds to a vast store 
of proof that WGN-TV's policy of quality programming presented with integrity 
results not only in industry recognition but in audience growth and loyalty as well. 

WGN-TV originates more live and color programming than all other Chicago 
stations combined, and is dedicated to providing the finest programming and 
quality community service to the great Chicago market. 




WGN-TV 



channel 9 



441 North Michigan Avenue • Chicago 11, Illinois 




and Miami knows it! 



The millions of south Floridians — and the millions 
more of their visitors — have learned to recognize 
(his area's authoritative news source ... Radio Miami 
WGBS! Consistent, dramatic news scoops have cap- 
tured the interest and attention of Miami's most 
able-to-buy audience. 

Complete local coverage, coupled with the world- 
wide CBS news staff, is one important reason why 
your best buy is Radio Miami WGBS, Florida's 
most quoted station. Represented by the KATZ Agency 



"Famous on the local scene 




21 



RADIO 


MIAMI • 50.000 WATTS 


WGBS WWVA 


WIBG WSPD WJW WJBK 


Mi.nni Wheeling 


Philadelphia Toledo Cleveland Detroit 




M'MNSOH • 2 M 



1959 



¥■ 



Sponsor backstage oniinued 



half of The Price Is Right. The other shrewd sponsors, whose video 
l)ii\s payout big "ii this basis are Dodge with Welk; Eastman Kodak 
.ind Mercur) with Sullivan: R. J. Reynolds \\ i I h I've Got a Secret; 
Chevrolet with their long-tim< doll, Dinah: Ford with the Tennessee 
Ernie of the same name; General Electric with the Theatre ol the 
same name; Speidel with The Price Is Right; and Kraft, who have 
jusl laid a fat $25,000,000 on the line to grab ('num. 

Top ten buyers are Bhrewd 

1 don't know whether it proves that manufacturers in Detroit are 
the smartest in the country or not, but the onl) product categor) 
represented b) more than one advertiser in tlii> top I" is automobiles. 
Dodge, Mercury, Chevrolet and Ford, of course, score for the Motor 
City. 

\nd. since Norman, Craig \ Kummel fathered this study, n<> one 
can do more than gasp slightlv and applaud the showing .1. Walter 
Thompson makes in this top 10 breakdown. JWT bought four of 
these lop I*' shows for four different clients of theirs: Sullivan for 
I astman-Kodak: Benny for Lever; Tennessee Ernie for Ford; and 
The Price Is Right for Lever. No other agenc) has more than one 
purchase in this elite package, and the ones who do are: Grant for 
Dodge with the Welk Show: Kenvon \ Kekhardt for Mercurv with 
The Ed Sullivan Show : \\ m. Est) for R. J. Reynolds with I've Got a 
Secret: Camphell-Kwald for ('hew with Dinah: Batten. Barton, 
Dur-tine and Osborn for O.K. with the Theatre: and Norman. Craig 
& Kummel with The Price Is Right for Speidel. 

The top 10 portion of this sur\e\ shed- some interesting light on 
still another phase of the business that has Keen a subject of contro- 
vert ever since television became lug business: That is the practice 
wheiebv top stars insist that their shows be produced 1>\ their own 
production firms. The stud) would tend to indicate that there was 
much justice in thi- approach on the part of the star-. I' our out of 
the top 10 show- listed arc produced In the production companies of 
the stars invoked. Teleklews. which produce- the Laurence Hell, 
Panting Party i- the Teutonic maestro's own firm: J\\l Productions, 
which brings in the Jack Benny show is owned substantial!) by 
Benny; Betford Productions is a Tennessee Ernie corporation: and 
Ixoncom. of course, is the production compan) owned b) Pen - ) Como. 

Not conclusive, but revealing 

Networks, themselves, are involved in the production of onl) two of 
the top 10: (IBS. of course, owns the Stilliran show, and NBC owns 
a piece of the Dinah Shore Chevy Show with Henr) JalTe Enterprises. 
Goodson-Todman. producing both the panel -tan/a- which made this 
top 10 / re Cut a Secret and The Price Is Right is the onl) independ- 
ent packager w ith two properties on the list. Be\ ue I w Inch, of course, 
i- MCA) and III' (which purchased the propert) from TPA) round 

out the first 10 b) delivering (,./:. Theatre, and Lassie respectively. 

None of these revelations are conclusive of anything which nun be 
applied in a broad or general wa\ to ever) television advertising 
situation. But all of them are interesting guideposts to more intelli- 
gent purchasing of television shows and time. ^ 






SPONSOR 



2 \i vi 1 959 



don't turn 
your back 
on the 
facts 



i ! 

n 



25 



WAVY-TV 





49th anc 
Madison 



all four 

Tidewater* Virginia 

TV Stations 

in share of audience 



during prime viewing hours 



share 3 to 6 p.m. 
Monday thru Friday 

share 6 p.m. to midnite 
Sunday thru Saturday 




(ARB • FOUR WEEK - FEB. • MARCH '59) 



Introducing the "Ambassador." 

A new concept in Merchandising. 

The "Ambassador Service" is 

Personal contact personified. 

Ask H-R for details on 

Complete Merchandising in Tidewater. 

Only WAVY-TV and Radio has it. 



WAVY-TV 



709 Bouih St. 

Norfolk, Vo. 

Tel. MA 7-2345 

801 Middle St. 
Portsmouth, Vo. 
Tel. EX 3-7331 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY H-R 



Holel Warwick 

Newport Newi, Va. 

Tel. CH 4-1741 



* SERVING NORFOLK, PORTSMOUTH, NEWPORT NEWS 
AND 47 COUNTIES IN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA 

AFFILIATED WITH WONDERFUL WAVY RADIO - 5000 W - 1350 KC 



Tv promotes tv best 
We have noted with interest the 
"Sponsor Speaks" column in your 
21 March issue. It is heartening to 
see a strong publication such as yours 
bringing into focus a situation that 
has long cried out for the attention 
of the industry. 

At KFMB-TV we have not spent a 
thin dime in newspaper program pro- 
motion since 1952. It has been our 
contention that our own medium can 
do the best job of building our own 
ratings. In a promotion department 
of six people, we have one man as- 
signed full time to creative produc- 
tion, scheduling, and supervision of 
on-the-air promotion announcements. 
Our program department cooperates 
with us 100%, and a good portion of 
our production coordinator's time is 
dedicated to top-notch production for 
our on-the-air promotion announce- 
ments. We budget a healthy amount 
to these efforts, and in the department 
responsibility chart, on-the-air promo- 
tion stands high on the list. 

Needless l" sa\ . we are com inced 
that this is the right track and 
stations engaged in wholesale news- 
paper rating wars are cutting their 
own throats while the newspapers 
look on with fiendish glee. 

Our congratulations to SPONSOR 
for pointing up this long overdue 
trend. 

Dan Bellus 

dir., sales development prom. 

KFMB-TV, San Diego 

Bread and butter ideas 
Seeing 1 \e been using promotional 
ideas from sponsor for quite a while, 
I decided il was lime I contributed 
a few. 

First, for your reference, a little 
background on Radio Station (III M. 
Original!) CHI M was a dawn-to-dusk 
operation with about 2' < of the au- 
dience. Our climb began in May ol 
L957 when we went 21 hours . . . 
.">.()()<) watts. Now CHI \I is nun] 
ber one in Toronto night time, week* 



SPONSOR 



L> \m IO.iO 



ends, and sec-saw injz between firsl 
and a close second da\ time. 

We contribute a great deal of our 
success to consistent promotion. 

\e\el .1 week ^li|>^ l>\ that He aren't 

[promoting station or personalities. 

For tins, we learned at the last 

( . VII. Convention i equivalent to 
your N.A.B. i that '"anion" men who 
know radio best" . . . the most pro- 
motion-conscious station is . . . 
•CIH \l . . .Two to One!" We come 
up with a lot ol idea- ourselves, hut 
a great deal of the glor) must go to 
ina^a/ines like SPONSOR, that 1 clip 
leach month, and who suppl) our 
hread and hutter idea-. 

Mien Farrell 

promotion ilir.. 

CHUM, Toronto 

Firm rate policy 

I can l begin to tell you how proud I 
was to see both our regional and 
national representatives supporting 
'Summer time is good radio spot 
time" campaign, in your publication. 
Sitting at the bead table at a re- 
cent Seattle Ad Club banquet, be- 
tween vice-president Douglas of Rain- 
ier Brewing Co. and Joe Maguire of 
BC&G i Olympia Beer) I felt proud 
that the\ both said KPQ was a ma- 
jor \oice for them in Inland Wasb- 
Iton. I also shuddered when \l.i- 
guire said "'it happens all the time." 
I he\ place a schedule on a station in 
a multiple market and then get 
prompt calls from all the other sta- 
tions "the\ could do it cheaper — 
give them more and throw in free 
matching promotion spot-."" He -a\- 
it makes him question his radio buy. 
"W ho can \ ou believe?" 

We have two house rules, ill If 
you can find anything in the open 
|ooks that does not appear on the 
rate card you get your ads free. (2) 
$500 sa\- we will with equal $ out- 
produce the newspaper 2 to 1 in re- 
sults. 

James \\ . \\ allace 

pres., KPQ 

U enatchee. B ash. 



Any Comments? 

SPONSOR likes to hear from its 
readers. ) our comments or 
your criticism represents one of 
our best methods of insuring 
that ice are accomplishing our 
purpose. 



KOBY 






is fjae no. 1 record 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

["here's .1 great new audience record that's the 
Numbei 1 nil in San Francisco and it's KOB\ 
January February Pulse gives K.OB\ the 
highest average share '> .1 m to midnight 
—15.0. 1 In- iu.ik< is KOBY a 
mil hi inn foi you. l l> 1- big 
audience is signed, sealed .mil 
delivered i"i you, youi i lients 
or produi ts 



See PETRY and get in on this 

b ■ I'll, you get 10% 
Jni.Nnii when buying KOBY and 
KOSI. !>' 'i.er. 



After July, when in Dernier, stay 
at the Imperial Motel— 1728 Sher- 
man— downtown. 



% 



KOBY 

For Greenville, .Mm.-WGVM 



Mid-America Broadcasting Company 




10,000 watts 
in San Francisco 



tf 



can be 
beautiful" 



Bin Junior showed Kit hooves 
10 every horse but one tn th# 
Corolino Cup race at nearby Com' 
den and wound up with monty 
and fame. Here eoch year over 
25.000 people gather to salute 
spring, picnic, party, ond some- 
times watch the races in one of 
the notion's most colorful social 
and Sporting events 



South Carolina's more than 2't 
million citizens cannot possibly be 
covered by the first TV market 
stations alone. WBTW offer* you 
easy access to South Carolina's 
second sociable million, united and 
made amenable to your mes- 
sage by first class television 
service, largely free from effective 
competition. Check NCS #3 
totals for South Carolina TV sta- 
tions. We'll make book you'll 
agree "Second Can Be Beautiful.'' 




South Carolina's 
dynamic young, 
< . i . rn r E. F 
HoRingM congratu- 

mmu 
Walsh, ri 
Bin Junwr. in the 

■ 
Cup Classic. 



Serving South Carolina's SECOND Biggest TV Market 




The Jefferson Standard 
Broadcasti.nc Company 



C 118 680 



D 117310 



SPONSOH 



2 M.O LTV 



27 




i 



: ^m 



V s .;>»» 



. » * * % 









i 






P^S* w^ 




+* 




When the Red Army marches on May Day, when the Russians vault into space, or test us 
in Berlin or meet with us at Geneva, every American is thrust into the picture. An under- 
standing of how and why is essentud for all who believe that the strongest armor of a free 
nation is an informed citizenry. 

Momentous events are impending in May. To place them in full perspective, ISBC. is 
presenting month-long news and information programming on a scale unprecedented in 
television. Scheduled in the evening and in the daytime, on weekdays and on Sundays, these 
television programs will offer every American a vivid insight into the forces and events that 
are shaping his future. 

Emphasis on news is traditional tcith ISBC. Each week, 5 '4 hours of television news pro- 
grams—more than on any other network — are presented f>y the world-wide staff and facilities 
of ISBC News, the largest news organization in broadcasting and the winner, so far this year, 
of 16 major awards for excellence of coverage and commentary. 

This is one of the ways in ichich ISBC. practices its basic philosophy: totality of program 
service . . . rewarding television for every program taste, and for every public necessity. 



TO WHOM IT MUST CONCERN! KEEP^ 
THIS LIST NEAR YOUR TV SET. NO ALERT 
AMERICAN CAN AFFORD TO SAY AFTER 
THE FACT: "IF I'D ONLY KNOWN IT WAS 
ON. I'D HAVE WATCHED IT!" 



FIRST MEN INTO SPACE-PART I MAY 3. 6:30-7:00 P. M.I An 

exclusive two-part documentary, filmed at Wright 
Air Development Center, on how the U.S. tested it- 
1 1 1 — t seven astronauts physicall) and psychologically 
for survival in outer >pace. 

PRIMER ON CENEVA MAY 3. 7:30-8:00 P.M. 1 A guide to tilt |* 

forthcoming Foreign Ministers' meeting — possible 
prelude i>> the Summit — by five distinguished NBC 
newsmen: Joseph C. Harsch (London I. Edwin 
Newman (Paris), John Ridi (Berlin), Irving R 

I r\ ine I Rome I . Frank Bourgholtzcr (Washington I 




■ BERLIN? (MAY 8. 8:00-9:00 P.M.) NBC News' Chet 
llitley pinpoints Free Berlin's importance in the 
♦Fent world political struggle with special film 
I 1 tells the city's story in affecting]; human as 
W as strategic terms. Live inserts will give last- 

■ 'ute developments on the eve of the Foreign 
Bisters' Conference. 

NT MEN INTO SPACE -PART II MAY 10. 6:30-7:00 P.M.) 
I conclusion of NBC's two-part documentary on 
I the U.S. tested its first seven astronauts. 

■ CHINA . . . UPDATE MAY 10. 7:00-7:30 P.M.) NBC News' 

Mind Special Report on Red China. Exclusive 
■is. shot behind the Bamboo Curtain, show some 
• he growing failures in the Communist regime, 
■jcted in open resistance to communal nurseries 
t the desire of Chinese families to return to many 



of their traditional ways. Frank McGee is narrator. 

GENEVA CONFERENCE REPORTS BE CI NN INC MAY 11 TO THE END OF 
the conference! NBC News' special corps of corre- 
spondents (Harsch, Newman. Rich and Levine | . 
supported by two camera crews, will cover the 
Geneva Conference in full. Their reports will be 
carried on TODAY (7:00-9:00 a.m.. Monday-Fri- 
day). HINTLEY-BRINKLEY REPORT (6:45- 
7:00 p.m., Monday-Friday), inserted into other 
regularly scheduled programs when necessary, and 
incorporated into NBC News Specials. 

OUR MAN IN THE MEDITERRANEAN MAY 17. 5:00-6:00 P.M.) NBC 

News' David Brinkley, in the role of observer. 



brings his distinctive journalistic style to bear on 
the manners and moods of Cairo. Beirut. Athens. 
Rome, the Riviera, Algiers, Granada and Cadiz. 

NOW. AND TEN YEARS FROM NOW (MAY 24, 500-6:00 P. M. 
A look at the events leading up to the eventual em- 
ployment of manned space satellites... and a glimpse 
at the exciting future. Part of the dedication of the 
Avco Research Center at Wilmington, Mass. 

MEET THE PRESS SUNDAYS. 6:00-6:30 P. M.) Penetrating ques- 
tioning of the newsmakers — still to emerge from the 
month's breaking news — by the headline-making 
press panel that has recently interviewed such per- 
sonalities as Fidel Castro and Anastas Mikoyan. 



NBC TELEVISION NETWORK 



To sell Indiana, 

you need both 

the 2nd and 3rd 

ranking markets. 

NOW 
ONE BUY 

delivers both — 



YOU NEED TWO LURES 

in Indiana ! 




In this area of many lakes, plus countless "ol' fishing 
holes," alert advertisers cover two major markets — 
South Bend - Elkhart and Fort Wayne — with one com- 
bination buy which saves 10% ! The coverage they get 
is from within — strong in its local loyalties — no longer 
influenced by that early-day "snow" from cities so far 
away. Take a close look at this rich interurbia: Over 
1.6 million population — $2.8 billion Effective Buying 
Income. Yours, with just one buy ! 



call your H ™ W% 



man now 



**£fcft 



MICH/GAN 




TO7 



SOUTH 8END LJELKHART 




TO7 Ds 



FORT WAYNE 




SPONSOR 

2 MAY 1959 







WHAT ADVERTISERS SPEND ON DAYTIME TV 

NETWORK SPOT Total 



1958 



72.190.000 



$182,730,000 



$355,220,000 



1957 



156,971.000 



115.038,000 



302,009,000 



1956 



153,791,000 



135,339.000 



289,133,000 



I •Source: Television Bureau of 1 Qross I me only. 



IWhy daytime tv is soul-searching 



Jr Sales again will top the year before, but static 
audiences could limit the range of potential sponsors 

W Big way out could be new network plan to air 
costly specials, pull in new viewers and more of them 



^a.i-l season, when daytime t\ net- 
work sales soared las did spot), the 
hosannas from ever) direction were 
enthusiastic. 

Next season sales will be even bet- 

Iter. But the hosannas are going to be 

|tempered somewhat. 

In a nutshell, a ceiling is becoming 

Risible, and until it's pierced — prin- 

IcipalK as regards audiences and pro- 



graming the range ol potential spon- 
sors apparently has its limits. 

Adding up the hooks on this semi- 
restricted gold mine, you will come 
across these major entries: 

• Clients: The biggest group ol 
daytime buyers continues to be the 
packaged goods — soap-, drugs, cos- 
metics. The\ want to reach women 
and to reach them often, lull as the 



audience base broadens, different 
kind- ol spon-ors as well as new ones 
are mm ing into da) time horn s. 

• Vudience: More than half 01 the 
da\lime audience i- women and pro- 
graming is therefore tailored for the 
housewife's tastes. There's a hard 
core ol these women who are heav) 
watchers — four hours a da) and 
mure. They're unusuall) i< >\ ;i I and 
responsive. 

• Costs: Daytime cost- are < >nl\ a 
third or a fourth I sometimes e\ en 
lessl than nighttime slots, and -how 
charges are also far less expensive 
because name personalities, costl) -el- 
and elaborate production are de- 
empha-i/ed. Hut program costs, which 
remain -eneralh stable, will go up 



SPONSOR 



2 MAT 1959 



I] 



Illll!l!lillll!!lll!lllll!!!!!llll!n 'll!!l|i|!!l!l!llilllllllllll!llll!!!ll!lll!!!lllllllllll!l!llll!illl 



M 



WHAT YOUR DAYTIME VS. EVENING DOLLAR WILL 
BUY ON THE TV NETWORKS 



1. 



2. 



You'll get four times as many daytime commercial minutes for the same money 

Daytime' Evening- 

APPROPRIATION $176,000 $175,400 

NUMBER OF TELECASTS 8 2 

TOTAL COMMERCIAL MINUTES 24 6 



Your cost per daytime commercial minute will be lower 

Daytime 

COST PER 1,000 

PER COMMERCIAL MINUTE $2.12 



Evening 



$3.57 



J. lint your monthly daytime audience will be smaller 

Daytime' 

MONTHLY HOMES REACHED 10,560,000 



Evening- 

12,804,000 



^f m ) our audience composition will be decidedly different 

Daytime' Evening 

Single show Monthly Single show Monthly 

CHILDREN (add 000 > 1,478 11,824 4,378 8,756 

TEENS add 000) 386 3,088 2,845 5.690 

WOMEN (add 000) 3,406 27,248 8.536 17,072 

MEN add 000) 1,156 9,248 6,129 12.258 

•Source: A. C. Nielsen, L958 I On< quartei I r show. 2. One half-hour, altera ate -week show. ;:. Does not Include contiguous discounts 



!;illl!ll!lllllllll!lllll!!llll!!lllllll!l!!!lll!llll!ll!lillllll!lli!i!li!!l! IlillllillllillllJIIIillM 



linn. illinium: .11 



as networks introduce some more 
costl) innovations. 

• Programing: Virtually 100'' ol 
the daj time producl is strip or across- 
the-board scheduling. It's unlikely 
this carry-over From radio will change 
excepl in 'me area: specials. For the 
first time, daytime show entries arc 
taking on the one-time-shol spectacu- 
lar formal of the nighttime offering 
in an effort hi inicrt excitement into 

daytime hour- and to gain bigger 
audiences. 

• Ratings: Ratings have been a hit 
depressed, as have sets-in-use. Net- 
works are injecting insulin in the 
I'M in el new show loi mat- on a 11101 e 



continuing basis than will he true "I 
the new specials. Networks are look- 
ing for both a bigger audience and 
new faces. Dav times pattern has hern 
to achieve excellent frequcnev which, 
however, is restricted to a more lim- 
ited number ol homo than nighttime. 
• Sales: The sell-out sign continues 
lo appear on most lime slots. \t last 
count, onlv I.")' , to 20' , of the . lav- 
lime schedule remained unsold 

roughl) I") hours out of 00 telecast 
hours from Mondav through Friday. 
Daytime iv ha- realized a lot of its 
potential hut most agenc) client ob- 
servers think it still has a long wav to 
eo. The networks agree. 



The current season is just now 
gaining momentum as \BC has 
moved more firmlv into competition 
with the other two networks after a 
short six-month entrj into the eighl 
year-old dav time race. 

CBS has long since settled down 
to success with its dav time serials. 
M>(! with it> popular game and par- 
ticipation -how-. Kach reaches from 
three to four million homes a dav. 
ABC. still juggling its schedule and 
determining its future stride. gofl 
int.. about 800,000 homes daily. 

Even though \B(" has acquired 
some popular properties in the past 
half year, the ratings tend to go to 



32 



SPONSOR 



2 \ivi 1959 



jthe dav lime -dials (average, 8.4) and 
Iquiz-audience participation snows 
(average, 7.7 i. 

The over-all currenl rating pattern 

f»>r davtime shows runs like tlii-: In 

I A. ('. Nielsen"- lu-t reporl in March, 

there were I I daytime serials with an 

average ralini: of !!. I bill a w ide 

range on individual shows from 1.9 

Ito 10.9. Of 2!! <|iiiz and audience 

[.participation show-, an average rating 

liof 7.7 included a high of 12.0 and a 

lllow of 2.0. Children's 30-minute 

Western- lonlv two on the air) 

bagged 19.3 and 11.7 for a average 

of 15.5. All other programs were 

lumped together with 10 15-minute 

[shows and four 30-minute shows. 

The quarter-hours averaged 9.3 with 

a span from •''>. I to 12.0. The half 

■hours ranged from 11.7 to 1 5. 1 for 

an average rating of 13.6. 

This year, now that all three net- 
i works are offering daytime service, 
■the margins in total circulation across 
[the countrv are narrowing: CBS and 
• NIK! reach about 00', to 97^ of all 
-els. \r,C between 809? and 85%. 
liDavtime spot business, of cour-e. has 
Igrown as more three-station market- 
have gotten this network sen ice. 

Network planners are traveling in 

a circle hut tr\ing to break through: 

hcv want to broaden the sponsor base 



and attract new advertisers as well as 
more tnone) , I o do this, thev must 
deliver a biggei audience and a more 
divei sified one. Bui lui ing the house 
w ile into the daj time v iew ing habit, 
it she's a iionv iewer, i- difficult. \nd 
the across-the-boai d progi am pattei n 
puts up barriers to the night) ime com- 
monplace of dial -witching. \- one 
neiwoi k executh e puts it : "It's hard 
to instill the habit in the lit -I place 
and then it- even harder to bleak it 
after it - >el ! 

Their answer to the problem i- the 
same: Create excitement something 
different from the bland -trip pro- 
graming and develop -bow- which 
can be talked-up and merchandised. 

Their wav- of finding this excitement 
v a i v . 

The most unusual innovation i- the 
upcoming I \lav i introduction of the 
daytime special bv CBS (which has a 
list of 50 suggested theme- tor these 

programs). NBC will follow suit in 
the fall, taking an opposite tack how- 
ever. CBS' first -how will be a -emi- 
documentarv on teenagers -and each 
of the half dozen projected show- in 
the specials class will be produced bv 
the public affairs -taff. NBC's specials 
will tend toward the entertainment 
concept in some cases, feature per- 
formers with high marquee value nor- 



mally identified with nighttime -how-. 

( !arl I .indemann, 1 1 .. v .p. in cl 
>d dav time pi "•-■ i aming .o NBl b.i- 
h\ c ol these big -how- in the woi k- : 
two di amatizations along such themes 
as marital infidelit) and i hildbirth 
without fear: a fashion -bow pre- 
sented in book-musical form; a I 
name -how : a -upei -p.-i ial i o. k n 
toll telecast from Madison Square 
< ..ii den. "|)av time's a good pi ov ing 
ground for nighttime tryouts,' is his 
opinion. 

His CBS countei part, < >scar Kat/. 
\ ,p. for da) time pi og rams, saj - se\ - 
ci al clients have -how n intense intei - 
esl in the upcoming spei ials there 

despite the COSt, "which will run from 

$60,000 to $80,000 without counting 
pre-emption charges.' I his contrasts 

w ilh the average dav time ipiai lei In >u i 
time charge of $22,000. 

The average nighttime hall houi 
costs $87,700, and these two cosl 
figures provide the basis for com- 
parison in the (hart at the top of 
page 32. 

In presenting shows of interest to 
women. Mi. kat/ i- nevertheless veer- 
ing awav from the "how to" home- 
making themes. ||js objective i- to 
"'explore in several new wav- the 
additional dimensions of the medi- 
i Please turn !<> page II! i 



1 



llllllillllllllllllllllllll 

THREE-YEAR TREND OF DAYTIME TV 

m The amount of sponsored network, time has been rising. 

1957 1958 



1959 



Number of 
sponsored '4 hours 



9-12 A.M. 12-3 P.M. 3-6 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 12-3 P.M. 3-6 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 12-3 P.M. 

228 219 345 195 233 315 245 154 



3-6 P.M. 

1(11, 



2 



m The number of homes viewing tv lias been decreasing slightly.' 

1957 1958 1959 



9-12 A.M. 12-3 P.M. 3-6 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 12-3 P.M. 3-6 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 12-3 P.M. 3-6 P.M. 

No. of homes i add 000 1 6,445 7.030 7,348 8,528 10,115 9,856 11,790 13,303 12,496 

% of total U. S. homes 16.4 18.0 16.7 21.7 23.8 22.4 30.0 31.3 28.4 

■Source v I \. •■ I Ian. -Feb. "f each through Frldaj »i Udren"s program!. 
' \ Nielsen; Jan. and Feb. of each year. 



... 
SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1950 



33 






PITY 



POOR 



PAT 



« 




What'- happened to Pat Weav- 
er?" asked a prominent New York 
agencyman as we sat at lunch. 
"Here's probably the most vibrant, 
colorful, perceptive guy in the whole 
advertising business and he's wrapped 
in mothballs. Can't he find a job?" 

"Well, he's got Kaiser and McCann- 
Erickson," we replied. 

"That's just window-dressing," 
said our friend. "I'm talking about 
a good steady top job that's in tune 
with Pat's talents." 

Just about the time we were be- 
ginning to feel sorry for poor Pat we 
decided, as a journalistic exercise, to 
check into the matter. True, we 
hadn't been hearing much about him 
lately — and normally Pat attracts 
news mentions like Marilyn Monroe 
attracts "lances. We knew he had 
officed himself with Dine and Kalmus, 
a public relations outfit, shortl) after 
leaving NBC in September 1956. 
That seemed to indicate that he in- 
tended to stay in the industry's eye. 
Had something gone wrong? 

It wasn't eas\ to check on Pat. 
especially since we decided to keep 
him from knowing what was going 
on. But bit b) bit we pieced together 
a picture of the present-day Pat — a 
man who has learned how to prosper 
sans pressure in the world of televi- 
sion. 

Pal ma\ be hibernating, as some 
say. If so, he's hibernating to the 
tune of $200,000 a vear. As consult 



Sl'ONSOK 



2 may 1959 



mi [or Kaisei Industries on a year- 
to-year contract he earns well over 
$100,000. His McCann-Erickson con- 
Bultanc) brings in another $75,000 or 
bo. * )dds and ends, including income 
from a substantia] famil) estate in 
Los Angeles, hike the total. If- like- 
K that Pal is the highest-paid con- 
sultant in advertising, and that his 
current income approximates what he 
received a> president and later chair- 
man of NBC. 

But his work as a paid consultant 
occupies oiiK half his time. Here's 



such activit) as work on new i\ ideas 
i.V , i. the Heart Fund which he 
»ei ves as a directoi I ■''>' b), a hush- 
hush governmental project that occa- 
sionally lake- him I" Washington 
\'.\', i. his l\ packaging firm known 
a> \\ eaver Associates i V ! > . routine 
office aeii\ it\ I 5 ( - I . and lunching oi 
visiting with old friends and business 
acquaintances. 

He surprised the industr) b) affili- 
ating with McCann-Erickson some 
months ago, leading to considerable 
speculation as to his full-lime future 



p r ess attention during 1 1 i - tenure as 
\ ice president and latei president at 
\l!< . appeal to I"- a thing "I the 
past. II'- has simplified his working 
life b) leaning more to verbal than 
to wi itten i ommunicat ion in the ex- 
change o| ideas. 

I [e has furthei simplified thin 
turning dow n pi ai I i( all) all of the 
1 1 i.i n \ speaking invitations which How 
In- w ,i\ . I le also rejects w i iting is 
signments, several ol the book vari- 
ety. Prim to bis Mc( lann-Erickson 
affiliation lie considered a numlier of 




CONSULTANT Weaver finds life can be pleasant in Honolulu. Here he discusses a television idea with Henry J. Kaiser and the late Mike Todd. 
Recently he flew to Spain to talk over a tv plan with Mike Todd, Jr. Pat's life as a tv consultant is varied, brings him $200,000 income a year 



how a Weaver work-month, accord- 
in" to friends and associates, breaks 
down: one week, or 2.V ', . on the 
\\ i'-l ('oast and/or Honolulu confer- 
rinu with Edgar Kaiser and Henry J. 
Kaiser on l\ and a variety of related 
matters; 2V; working with kev ex- 
ecutives at McCann-Erickson, notably 
Marion Harper and tv head Terry 
dyne; 25$ in \ll>anv or New York 
assisting Governor Nelson Rocke- 
feller, a warm friend since their Dart- 
mouth davs. in his public relations. 
The remaining 2.V - is taken up by 



with that agency. At McCann, as at 

Kaiser, he serves as an idea-stimula- 
tor and appraiser on a high-level 
basis. His free-wheeling mind cou- 
pled with thirty vears of practical 
advertising experience give him high- 
priority rating on the time of Marion 
Harper and Hemv Kaiser. His in- 
cisiveness in cutting through a com- 
plicated situation and getting to the 
heart of a problem is mentioned bv 
his close associates as one of his ex- 
ceptional consulting abilities. His 
wordv memos, which attracted much 



agenev jobs, looked into tv station 
ownership, was even asked to become 
dean of men at two colleges. Re- 
cently he has been mentioned as the 
man needed to bring lustre au,\ pres- 
tige to the faltering national radio 
field. 

I- or a man out of a stead) job Pat 
keep- remarkabl) active. When in 
New York he arrive- dailv between 
9 and 9:30 at his 130 Park Wenue 
office I -till w ith Dine & Kalmus 
where his -tall of two await- him. 
I Please turn to page 7"> | 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 



35 



WHAT TV NETS OPTION AT PRESENT 

ABC TV CBS TV NBC TV 

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 


2 to 2:30 p.m. 

3 to 4:30 p.m. 
5 to 6 p.m. 


2 to 5 p.m. 


2 to 5 p.m. 


7:30 to 10:30 p.m. 


8 to 11 p.m. 


7:30 to 10:30 p.m. 



FCC WANTS TO CHOP DOWN 
NET OPTION TIME BY 17% 



I he five-) ear-old recurring case of 
jitters over the question of network 
tv option time broke out again last 
week as the FCC proposed five rule 
changes — one of which would whittle 
away a half hour in each of the four 
daily segments of option time. 

While this is a relatively mild de- 
privation when stacked against the 
Justice Department's formal opinion 
that the whole practice of option time 
is a violation of anti-trust laws, there 
arc those in broadcast advertising 
who view FCC's proposal as onlj the 
first whack of the axe. 

The five rule changes would be: 

• Reduce from three to two-and- 
uiie-half hours total option time with- 
in each of the four segments of the 
broadcast day. I Those segments are 
8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., 6 
|i. in. to 11 p.m. and 11 p.m. lo 8 a.m.) 
There would be an exception to this 
for long special events or public af- 
fairs programs. 

• Prevent "straddle' programs 
from having the effect of extending 
ni'i programing into non-option time 
pei iods. 

• Provide more flexibility to re- 
quired period of notice before a net 
ma) exercise its option. (For exam- 
ple, l.'i week- notice instead "I pres- 
ent 8 weeks i . 

• ( Jive stations i ighl to rejecl net 
shows alreadj contracted Im as well 
,i- programs offered (al present < >nl\ 



16 



the offered shows can be rejected). 

• Broaden station's rights to ac- 
cept or reject net programs to free 
station to substitute another program 
of greater local or national impor- 
tance. 

Network executives now are en- 
grossed in study of the proposed 
changes and in preparing comments 
to present by 22 June. The FCC 
move could hardly have come as a 
shock to the industry; for this ques- 
tion has been on the boil periodically, 
since last year's Barrow Report. And 
as one net spokesman said, "Nothing 
that conies out of Washington shocks 
us anymore. 

The FCC also will be getting com- 
ments from syndicators and broad- 
casters. Main of these will fax or the 
proposed changes. \n extra half hour 
of non-net time at night, for example. 
will give a film syndicator a better 
chance to sell another show. It can 
also ui\e a station a chance at selling 
localh another half hour. How at- 
liarlbe this can be to both station 

and syndicator was demonstrated in 

main markets recent!) when CBS l\ 
changed it- option time from 8 to II 
p.m. to 7:30 to L0:30 p.m. I The net is 
back mi ['< to II again. I During thai 
time, however. (T>S T\ affiliates and 

their advertisers reveled in the 10:30 
slot, especiall) on Saturday nights 

when it followed the net's high-rated 
western, Gunsmoke. & 



W NBC Spot Sales survey of 
media buyers finds them split 
on live vs. syndicated issue 



#% deep respect for local tv pro- 
graming and some enlightening facts 
about buying attitudes and practices 
in that sector have been uncovered by 
NBC Spot Sales' latest surve\ among 
media executives and timebuvers. 

While all types of local video found 
at least one champion, the service 
shows — news, weather and sports — 
were singled out for an especially 
hearty pat on the back. 

The personal salesmanship of local, 
live personalities was hailed by the 
air media buyers. W bile there was 
an obvious awareness of the values 
of live television in general, there 
was no clear-cut vote for live oxer 
film or vice versa. 

There were resen ations. too. Some 
bin ers noted with regret a shortage 
of live formats. Also, there was a 
feeling that, despite the value of a J 
strong local personality, there weren't 
enough around. Others said their in- 
abilit) to see local shows at first-hand 
was a serious handicap. 

The survey, fourth in a series 
mailed to Spot Sales' Timebiner 
Opinion Panel, is based on responses 
from 271 panelists working for 170 
different advertising agencies or 09 
fiees. While the rep organization 
pointed out that the results were not 
meant to be projected to the total . 
universe of air media buyers, answers 
were recorded from virtualh all 
the major agencies and main smaller 
ones in all sections of the country. 
Of the 271 respondents. 15'! work 
for agencies whose radio tv billings 
are above $5 million while 55^i are | 
employed b\ the under-$5 million 
group. 

A host of interesting fads about 
Inner reactions to specific buying 
situations were disclosed. Here an 

some highlights: 

• Vmong the larger agencies, the 
demand for local programing with 

primal \ appeal to men was almost ■ 
great as that for programing that an 



SPONSOR 



1 \\\\ 1959 



shows voted tops in local video 



peals primal il\ to women audiences. 

• Nearlj three oul of four panel- 
ists said thai program compatibility 
with a client's product was definitelj 

a major factor in Inn ing. 

• Most panelists 1 56' ! > feel that 
the "live" factor in local programing 
offsets a higher rating on a him -how 
to Mime degree. 

• First emphasis in buying a fea- 
ture film show i- on the shows rating 
history, then the station - film librar) 

and. last l\ . the current rating. 

• In buying a local news program, 

ratings are the first consideration, the 
new-caster's style and deliver) come 
next, and the news content is third. 

• I hose who object to editorial- 
izing on a station were about equal to 



those who Favor it 27\ \-. 30% . 
respectively hut the biggest single 
group (399? I bad no strong feelings 
one w a\ or another, 

• \hout half of all respondents 
said the) would consider buying a lo- 
cal "public sei \ ice' -how for one of 

their client-. 

• In bin ing lime for a familx 
product, there wa- an overwhelming 
\ole in la\or ol an adult show rather 
than a children- show where audi- 
ence composition in both cases is 
.">()' , adult- and 50' i children. 

• \ question on preferences be- 
tween local live and syndicated film 
show-, assuming costs are equal, 
found timebuyers neatl) split — a re- 
flection, among other things, of the 



big variet) ol products represented 

• Two-thirds ol the respondents 
said thai the pei Bonal salesmanship oi 
a local t\ pei sonalit) was ol "great 
importance in the sales effe< i i\ eness 
ol ,i ci immei cial. 

• Generally, buyers fell a host 
w as ol gi eal impoi tani e in a chil- 
dren's cai loon -how lnil mil so im- 
poi i, mi hi a feature film pi ogi am. 

• llin ei - in I. ii gei agent ies tend 
to w atch i atings foi a longer pei iod 
ol i ime than i hose in -mallei ag< n 
cie- before making up theii minds 
about the merits of a pi ogi am. 

• A surprising high percentagi 

i I 7 I -aid their client- wen- interested 

in local color -how -. despite the small 
i Please turn to page 76 i 



HOW TIMEBUYERS REGARD LOCAL LIVE VS. FILM 
PROGRAMING, PERSONALITIES, EDITORIALIZING 



As between a live participation show and a 
feature film show, to what decree does the 
live factor compensate for a rating superiority 
of the film show? 



How important is the personal salesmanship 
of a local tv personality in the sales effective- 
ness of a commercial? 



to a large degree 

to some degree .. 
to no degree 
no answer 



No. 


2l 




No. 


3k 


30 


11 


of great importance . 


182 


67 


152 


56 


of some importance 


80 


29 


79 


29 


of minor or no importance 


7 


3 


10 


4 


no answer 


2 


1 



Would you prefer to buy a half-lionr syndi- 
cated film program or a local live program 
built with your product in mind, assuming 
costs to be equal ? 



film 

live 

no difference 
no answer 



No. 

no 

112 
26 
23 



2a 
41 
41 
10 
8 



If you were to buy a local news program, 
would you favor or object to station editorial- 



izing . 



faVOl editorializing 
object to editorializing 
no strong opinion 
no answer 



No. 


fa 


81 


30 


74 


27 


107 


39 


9 


4 



NBC Spot Sales' fourth survey of timebuyer opinion elicited 271 responses from 170 different agencies and offices. Four of 
questions asked are shown above with answers. Of all answers 45 represent agencies billing $5 million or more in air media 



SPONSOR • 2 M \^i 1959 



'.7 




THE BEST RADIO PITCH 



I EVER HEARD 



^ How WBZ-A, Boston, helped the Sullivan ageney 
sell Hampden Harvard Breweries on sponsorship of news 

^ The presentation took lesss than half an hour, hut 
the wallop hro tight an immediate order of over $50,000 



by Robert N. Sullivan 

vice president. Daniel F. Sullivan Co., 
Boston, Mass. 



^■ights went out and the curtain 
parted to show a color slide of a 
building on fire. From the back of 
l lir studio came the scream of fire 
engine sirens. The stage was set for 
a time-slide radio presentation on 
what news program sponsorship over 
\\ I!/ \. Boston, could do for our 
client, Hampden Harvard Breweries 
Inc. of \\ illimanselt. Ma — . 




Robert N. Sullivan: Indelible impression 



To the presentation in the station's 
studios, we brought officials of the 
brewen along with 90 of their sales- 
men. We had indicated to WBZ-A 
that we thought their radio presenta- 
tion should be basic because the 90 
beer salesmen were not advertising 
specialists. What the station came up 
with confirmed our belief that it 
could do an effective job for Hamp- 
den Harvard. They handled the en- 
lire pitch as if none of us knew any- 
thing about radio or advertising. It 
left an indelible impression on 
brewer) executives and their sales- 
men. 

The entire presentation took less 
than a half hour. It was the best 
radio presentation I have ever seen. 
It was dramatic, factual, positive, 
timely and it gave reasons "why." 
The result was the largest single 
order ever booked in the Boston sta- 



.;:; 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 



lion— 37-year broadcasting history. 
EDITOR'S VOTE: sponsob checked 
on this order, found it to be far in 
excess of $52,000 for the past »<•"/ 
(21 newscasts n week during the past 
year at about $50 /"' program). In 
addition, the Hampden Harvard 
Breweries bought a heavy .schedule of 
time signals as an outgrowth of the 
presentation. 

Here is bow t V i « ■ presentation went: 

\- the wail of sirens faded under, 
more color slides caught the action 
of WBZ-A newsmen at the scene of 
the fire — broadcast ing from mobile 
units, checking details by telephone, 
interviewing spectators and survivors, 
and relaying this information to ra- 
dio listeners within minutes of the 
happenings. The immediacy, dimen- 
sion and primacy of radio news 
coverage was vividly portrayed. 

As part of the basic approach, we 
watched a film that demonstrated the 
modern newsgathering procedures of 
radio. How Westinghouse Broadcast- 
ing Co.'s outlets share in gathering 
and casting news, how it is hand- 
tailored in the group's Washington 
news bureau was detailed step-by-step. 

Politz and Pulse surveys helped 
document the contention that radio 
is the prime news medium. Then a 
\\ I!/- \ film reported other survej 
results showing its news as No. 1 in 
New England. This section of the 
presentation was outstanding in its 
reliance on Nielsen and Pulse data 
and for its restraint from slurring 
competitive radio stations. The film 
outlined Hampden Harvard's sales 
problem and how radio could help it. 
Maps contrasted station coverage 
with the brewers distribution area. 

As the curtain closed, the lights re- 
mained out and a spotlight swung to 
a \^ BZ- \ newsman. He read a sim- 
ulated newscast featuring our agency 's 
new sound treatment of Hampden 
Harvard commercials. The spot 
switched to charts of the proposed 
schedule. And to dramatize how 
main people the campaign would 
reach in a week, a high stack of tele- 
phone directories was displayed, rep- 
resenting \\ BZ- \ listener^ based on a 
special Nielsen study of the schedule. 

The final clincher: W ■ BZ- \ news- 
man Leo Egan called on the Hampden 
Harvard salesmen to join the station's 
news team as correspondents — and 
each one received a press card. ^ 




Explaining schedule: WBZ's Ronald Buchanan outlines purpose of 21 newscasts weekly 
PlillllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllH 

HOW PITCH MADE ITS POINT 

The start: "A fire is raging out of control. Li res and prop- 
erty are threatened. Time — 6:30 p.m. New Englanders 
will hear about it three ways — ratlio. tr. newspapers.' 

"All three neivs media rush reporters . . . and what happens'.' 

it 6:30 a.m. — 12 hours later — newspaper reads 'Fire 

out of control at Framingham.' The tv news must wait 

until 11 p.m. Rut the radio coverage begins within minutes." 

''Radio is the first source oj news. Radio tells you what 
is happening while it is happening. Tr tells you uhat 
was happening and newspapers tell \<>u what happened." 






Clincher: At presentation's end, newscaster Leo Egan hands "press cards" to client's staff 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 





'Thrifty Scot' switches 



1,0 S*.*, 




'^Jt$ »•■«« " ^ PANICLES MARKE T 




McDANIEL'S, 21-store So. Cal. food chain, uses Thrifty Scot' as symbol. Well-known from tv use, he now keys radio copy, adorns new outlets 



^ Southern California food chain gets $500,000 sales 
increase monthly from sweeping change in ad strategy 



#%s everybody knows, Los Angeles 
is now the nation's No. 2 market. 
It's also a known fact that saturating 
this market from end to end involves 
some problems of distance and ter- 
rain that can't he ignored. 

You'd soon lose track of the num- 
ber of newspapers you'd have to buy 
to do the job; even with tv certain 
problems - notably costs - - could 
arise. If your budget is limited, 
you've got to extend your reach in 
sonic other wa\ . 

So, you might take a page mil of 
the book dl a supermarket chain 
whose growth got out of reach of it* 
tv coverage area. It switched to spot 
radio, and is now in it to the tune of 
1575,000 a year, said to be the largest 
radio spot purchase b\ an\ market 
chain in the 11 western states. 

There are 21 McDaniel's Markets 
located from Oxnard to Long Beach, 
roughl) 100 miles. Vintage movies 
on television had worked fine when 
McDaniel's was a growing chain 
i from L951-57, McDaniel's had its 

own late movie slot and it- own 

host i . Then, Ironicall) . the verj 

growth that the l\ success had 

brought about began to catch up with 

the sprawling chain. 

In 10.")."). explain- ,|imm\ I lit/, 
president of ,|imm\ Fritz \ \»- oc. 

ad agency, the gradual transition to 
radio began. "Oui ln-t buy," he 



says, "in March of 1955 was 3,120 
spots on KBIG on a 52-week con- 
tract. Results were evident almost 
immediately. Within the first year 
McDaniel's sales skyrocketed over 
100%, to the highest peak in their 
34-year history. So far, we had made 
no change in our previous television- 
newspaper advertising format. 

Gradually McDaniel's began ad- 
ding other stations. "We started Inn- 
ing other stations with specific ap- 
peals in mind: long hair, rock n roll, 
standard and pop tunes — all of these 
had a place," says Fritz. "Rock n 



RADIO COVERAGE is plotted by McDaniel's 
r): Harrington, KBIG; Edleman, KDAY; adman 



roll programing was aimed at attract- 
ing teenagers, who will be the home- 
makers of tomorrow. McDaniel's be- 
lives in establishing the shopping 
habit early.'' he adds. Other spots 
were aimed at the whole family, par- 
ticularly the housewife. McDaniel's 
discovered that last-minute changes 
in plans could be reflected as quickly 
as the next scheduled spot. 

While extending its reach. Mc- 
Daniel's was broadening its base. In 
1957. the chain decided to go it al- 
one with radio and supporting news- 
paper ads. Currently, the chain uses 
nine L.A. stations: KBIG. KDAY, 
KFI. KFWB, KGIL (San Fernando 
YalleN |,KLAC,KP0L, KRKD (Long 

Beach I, KXLA. The 1050 contract 
calls for 50.000 30-second spot-. 

Markets' v. p. A. L. Wolins (seated) and (I to 
Fritz; Ewing, KXLA; Horgan, LaPointe, KLAC 




10 



SPONSOR 



2 \\\\ 1959 



to radio 



Manufacturers and food processors 
can bu) into them al S12.50 per 
spot. Depending on the duration of 
tin- buy. Mi Daniel s has devised four 
— I » « » t schedules. \ll schedules include 
bonus items such as stacks in all 21 
stores, in -Mo re promotion, and news- 
paper insertions. 

Hie cereal, soup, or soap compan) 
buying the spots gets the full com- 
mercial treatment with variations of 
the "shop al McDaniel's" tag. Mc- 
Daniel's slogan, used in all spots, is 
"Shop and Save at the Sign of the 
Thrift) Scot." 

"We sold two-thirds of our spots 
on a participation basis."' Fritz ex- 
plains. "The balance is devoted to 
specials and institutional copy." Im- 
portant factor in sewing up the co-op 
spots was the prior experience Mc- 
Daniel's suppliers had received from 
ill-store promotion and merchandis- 
ing support tied to the radio schedule. 

Some idea of McDaniel's growth 
is described b\ \lhert I.. Wolins, \ ice 
president and general manager of 
McDaniel's. He sa\s that sex en years 
ago McDaniel's wasn't even listed in 
Ike Continuing Home Survey, put out 
In lad- Consolidated. "Bui during 
1958, he -av-. "our business in- 
- I at the rate of $500,000 per 
month in volume." 

Wolins. full\ crediting spot radio, 
list- these reasons For McDaniel's use 
of the medium : 

• \\ idespread circulation 

• Personal appeal 

• FIe\ibilit\ 

• It s a famil) medium 

• \ concentration of spot- will 
bring quick acceptance of a product 
new or old 

• Participating spots with sup- 
pliers can be arranged efficiently and 
economically. 

• In Southern California, ear 
radios are a big consideration 

McDaniel's, which started in l')22 
with a single market in the little town 
"f W ilmar in California's San Gabriel 
Vallev. has five new store- under 
construction. Vccording to Wolins. 
more stations will be added so that 
McDaniel's reach into new areas will 
continue to be complete. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 mat 1959 




New Radio Advertising Plans Guide for N.W. agency media people gets final layout check 
from J. Swenson, r, of Art Moore & Assoc, rep firm, which published book with 65 radio stations 



THE TIMEBUYER GETS A 
BREAK IN THE NORTHWEST 

^ Report summarizes market info and ruts paper work 



■ madio's anil t\ - constant stri\ing 
to ease the paperwork burdens of 
agencv media people has been bolst- 
ered in the Pacific Northwest b\ a 
tactic developed cooperatively by 65 
radio stations. 

rhese stations are circulating to 
every advertising agency in the 
Seattle and Portland metropolitan 
areas and in other markets a 204-page 
"Radio \d\ertising Flans Guide" fo>- 
timebuyers. The comprehensive re- 
port covers points on which buyers 
and media directors reported thev 
needed information to make judici- 
ous, practical buying decisions. 

\rt Moore & Associates, Inc.. ra- 
dio and l\ station representative linn, 
conducted the survey among hundreds 
ol regional agency people at the re- 
quest of the stations. Here - what the 
agency executive- said thev wanted 
to know and to have — and it's what 
the new Flans Guide gives them: 

1. Simplified and uniform rate 
card-, with more uniformity in pack- 
age rate- particularly, so that budget 
planning as well a- the actual buying 
would be easier and more accurate; 

2. Clear-cut and realistic merchan- 
dising proposals with an outline of 
mutually agreeable method- for fol- 
low-through: 

3. I p-to-date and authoritative 



station research and -uivev material: 
!>. Complete market data for the 
station area; 

5. \ecurate coverage map-. 
The final report now going to buy- 
ers follows a five-yeai continuing 
Study of agency planning and buv- 
ing need-. After the survey was com- 
pleted, the stations themselves con- 
ducted regional seminars to further 
refine buyers' problems and some 

possible solutions. 

One result: a uniform package-rate 

breakdown for all of the station-. 
with manager- providing the basic 
material for the final report. Fifty- 
one station- an' represented in the 
first printing and more will be added 
a- the Flan- Guide i- updated and im- 
plemented every -ix month-. Basil 
Station information i- printed and 
charted on ,",'._. by II beav} sheets 

for quick deletion or insert from the 

loose-leal binder. I he design ami pro- 
duction of the material wa- super- 

V i-ed by \l I MoOl e \ \--,,< i.ite-. 

Each of the station profile- ini ludes 
this tvpe of information: cities cov- 
ered, station executive personnel, ad- 
dress and telephone number, name 

of the representative, market data 

• power, frequency, population and 

retail -ale- figures), regional and 

local rate-, package rates. ^ 



II 






BIG REASONS 
FOR TV SPOT 



^ PGWs 4 Mr. Thinkbigly' presentation cites regional, 
seasonal and market variations which build spot values 

^ Representative firm aims 35-city pitch to brokers, 
wholesalers, district managers at the grass-roots level 



GEORGE C. CASTLEMAN, v. p. for business 
development at PGW, who began the na- 
tional tour of "Mr. Thinkbigly Goes to Town" 
spot tv presentations in Peoria this week 



I his week in the grass-roots city 
of Peoria, 111. 100 district managers, 
sales supervisors, wholesalers, bro- 
kers, agency and advertising men sat 
down for the first public showing of 
a new slide and motion picture film 
presentation titled, "Mr. Thinkbigly 
Goes to Town." 

What they saw was a crisp, color- 
ful, 25-minute explanation of the 
basic values and opportunities in spot 
tv, prepared by station representatives 
Peters, Griffin & Woodward, and han- 
dled by former agency man, George 
C. Castleman, now PGW's v.p. for 
new business development. 

Noteworthy aspect of the Mr. Think- 
bigly presentation is that it is aimed, 
not at a handful of sophisticated 
Madison Ave. media men, but directly 
at the local level of the national manu- 
facturer's sales operations. 

Mr. Thinkbigly, a mythical char- 
acter, is a "big business man with 
sound business sense but little knowl- 
edge of advertising." And it is to 
such men that PGW is making its 
spot tv pitch. 

When Mr. Thinkbigly seeks counsel 
from his associates in marketing, 
sales and advertising, he is given 
I through charts and graphs) an ele- 
mentary education in spot tv and 
much sound basic information such 
as is shown at the right. 

PGW developed "Mr. Thinkbigly 
Goes to Town" as a sequel to it> 
highly successful "A Local Affair" 
which last year was presented to sev- 
eral thousand sales and ad\crlising 
executives coa-t to coast. Mr. Think- 
bigly will push the spot television 
sales story in at least 35 cities this 
year, and will also be presented to a 

number of leading national advertisers 



and agencies at their home offices. 

In explaining the presentation to 
its station clients PGW says, "Al- 
though advertisers and agencies are 
prime targets for our presentation, it 
is not designed for media people of 
timebuyers. 

"We're showing how spot tv can 
be used to integrate advertising plans 
with sales plans. We have therefore 
tried to aim it at people who are con- 
cerned with over-all marketing strate- 
gy, and also to those who are con- 
cerned with your sales results." 

The PGW presentation package in- 
cludes 80 individual color slides, ex- 
amples of tv commercial spots, and 
a revised edition of "Spot Television 
Cost Yardsticks" giving representa- 
tive costs for half hour programs, 
participations, nighttime announce- 
ments and or discount plans in 69 
markets where, says the representa- 
tive firm. "leading stations cover 
85% of all U. S. tv homes." 

\l>o included arc nionthh average 
temperature figures for these markets 
for planning seasonal campaigns. 

In addition to the charts detailing 
the seasonal, regional and brand \ari- 
ations for cleansers shown on the op- 
posite page, the Mr. Thinkbigly pres- 
entation also provides similar data 
for a variet) of other products such 
as cake mixes, paper napkins, etc. 

PGW's strategy for the Mr. Think] 
biglj campaign is expressed in this 
wa\ In H. Preston Peters. "We l>e- 
lieve that "local men' are highly im- 
portant. Vlthough the) do not make 
final decisions, we know that selling 
them on the \ allies and advantages 
of sp,>t t\ is often the first step to 
selling our philosophy at plans head- 
quarters.' ^ 



42 



SPONSOR 



2 m\y 1 059 



:ONAL 
RAGE 



REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN PER CAPITA SALES 

HOUSEHOLD CLEANSERS 

Pacific West Central East Cwrtral South Northawt 




128 


160 




82 
52 




57 


lOURCCi Tv« (NIELSCN FOOO IMOCX 







1. TO SPEND WHERE 
YOUR MARKETS ARE 

\lam products, such as house- 
hold cleaners, slum u ide sales 
variations in different parts oj ike 
country. Spot tr allows adver- 
tisers tO spend their promotion 
dollars where opportunities are 
greatest, has no waste circulation. 



2. TO CONCENTRATE 

IN BUYING SEASONS 



though countless products are 
bought seasonally, few except 
marketing experts realize that 
these seasons differ by areas. 
Spot tv provides a chance to plan 
campaigns exactly pinpointed to 
seasonal and regional needs. 



SEASONAL VARIATION IN PER CAPITA SALES 

HOUSEHOLD CLEANSERS 

Oct-Nov Dec-Jan Feb-Mar Apr-May June-July Aug-Sept 



EAST 
CENTRAL 100 
STATES 







140 


109 


103 




95 








76 


77 





SOUTHERN 
STATES 




136 



105 



118 



SOURCE: T.B NIELSEM FOOO INDEX 



SHARE OF MARKET 

HOUSEHOLD 
CLEANSERS 

(PERCENT-BY BRAND) 

HUMEl TTWJtOCX. JAM, t* 



San Francisco 



42.1 



; 34.5 

A B C D Others 



Minneapolis St. Paul 



Dallas-Ft. Worth 



47.2 



24.4 
18.0 | 

JlU 



A B C D Others 



Buffalo 



52.2 




Miami 



19^17.6 

JU 



36.6 

126.4 
A 



3. TO BOLSTER UP 
BRAND WEAKNESSES 

As this chart dramatically shows, 
even leading national brands hat e 
aide market-by-market (hut na- 
tions. Vote hou brand I. a lead- 
er in Buffalo, is a poor third in 
Dallas. Spot tr allou s stepped up 
support where needs arc greatest. 



43 



A B C Others 




haH dollar bank 



^HaH dollar bank 



HURTING BANKER: ". . . getting people to save is like pulling teeth." FARM BANKER: "Not a disguise . . . just Hank, fresh-from-the-farm. 



THIS IS A BANKER? 



^ Competition among Wheeling banks is so keen that 
bank exeeutive himself goes on tv with offbeat pitch 

^ News, sports buys are aimed at broad range of 
prospects : small loans, business men, general depositors 



I lie protean-looking gentleman in 
the pictures above is the ultimate in 
the trend toward hank friendliness. 

He's Henry Duinnell. assistant sales 
V.p. of the Half Dollar Trust & Sav- 
ings in Wheeling, West Virginia. As 
the bank's t\ spokesman, "Hank from 
the Bank, ' he's probably the best 
know n hanker in low n. 

His hank is one of three S I <>' ■ 

million banks who share the \\ heeling 

pie with one $52 million hank. His 

colleagues credit him with keeping 

the hank - loans at a constant level 
' \ en in the face of dips chew here. 

Thej don i quite know and neithei 
does I hmk jn-i how lii- i\ approach 
brings in the business: "lb- broken 
all the rules of a reporter, television 
personality, announcer, anything on 



television," says one admiring col- 
league. "His voice is like gravel in 
a huh cap," reports another. 

Hut one thing they do know : a 
shrewd combination of humanizing 
an intangible and pinpointing differ- 
ent audiences is behind it all — a pat- 
tern that demonstrates the diverse 
segments of a market l\ can reach. 

Hall Dollar is largel) after two 
groups: the auto or small loan pros- 
pect on one hand, management people 
and business men in general on the 
other. 

"For both groups, it was deemed 
necessarj to lift banking out ol the 
mausoleum category and into some- 
thing pleasant and friendly. Tv and 
Hank -coined like llie right combina- 
tion to accomplish thi-.'" says execu- 



tive vice president John Nash, who 
placed the advertising. The approach 
was cautious at first: A one-minute 
spot per day adjacent to the 8:55 a.m. 
news segment in the Today show o\ei 
NBC's Wheeling outlet. WTRF-TV. 

At first, the bank was watching 
Hank more carefully than the) were 
watching results. He was good-na- 
tured, happy enough around the bank 

hut would he survive tv? Frankly, 
it scared him stiff. "\l\ biggest fear. ' 
he sa\ s. "was that the TelePrompTei 
w as going to fall on me. 

It didn't, and within 13 wok-. 
Hank had a following. People came 
into the hank looking for him. It wag 
decided to branch Hank out a hit. 
Other -pot- were bought on \\ ll\l- 
IV'. mainl) in newscast adjacencies 
aimed at reaching the business man. 

Soon il was obvious that Hank had 
appeal for both groups, so another 

experiment wa- tried this time la 
reach the broad base of prospects for 
small loans. The vehicle: sports. 

A Fortuitous rain) afternoon and 
the fact that the first buy was a min- 



ute befoii 



d after a Pittsburgh- 



II 



SPONSOR 



2 MAY 1959 




IVY LEAGUE BANKER: "Okay, so it's still Hank-from-the-bank 



STRAIGHT BANKER: 



\rm\ game gave 1 1 1 « - bank it- answer 
Mon<la\ morning. People were on 
hand when the bank was open to talk 
their problems over with Hank. In 
lad. the load was so heavy that in 
next Saturday s sports Inn a slight 
ehange in cop\ occurred. Hank was 
saying, "Feel free to come in and 
see anybody at anytime about any- 
thing" to take some of the load olT 
of him. 

\ regular Saturday schedule i\ini: 
in with the NBC Game of the It eel, 
was worked out. When a co-op deal 
was available through WTRF-TV the 
hank bought one-half or one-third. 
depending on what thej could get. 
When it was nationally sponsored in 
its entirety, the minute before and 
after was the usual purchase. The 
same pattern extended into the basket- 
ball season. 

The Half Dollar Trust & Savings 
Rank of Wheeling was definite!) out 
of the mausoleum class 1>\ the end of 
the '58 basketball season. Kids were 
darting into the hank, circling the 
desks to get a glimpse of Hank. The\ 
might be ejected 1>\ a hank guard 
after they'd gotten their glimpse, but 
always in the "friendliest" way, of 
course. 

In all. the "friendliest hank in 
town"* spent a little under (8,000 



in its carnival-like flirtation with i\ 
thai year, amounting to about 25* i 
ol its total ad budget. 

\t the beginning of the 1958-59 

-ports season. Hank and the bank 
were back again. What the\ had 
learned the year before was applied 
\er\ systematically to the schedule 

worked out for the 2(> weeks on 
W IRF-TV: 

• A week!) co-op sponsorship or 



. it's your old friend Hairless Hank again 



before-and-after adjacenc) to the NBC 

Game of the It eel, <>u Satunhn. Hank 
aims his commercials at the small or 
auto loan prospect. 

• Early evening newscast adjacen- 
cies. Here Hank talk- about the gen- 
eral services and character of the bank 
to businessmen. 

• Local cut-ins on Today, near the 
news. Hank talks to both audiences 

i Please turn to page 76 



HOW HANK GETS BANK PROSPECTS 

SM VLL LOANS: Spurts programing does the best job here. 
Half Dollar Trust & Savings buys co-op sponsorship or before- 
and-after adjacencies to network football, basketball games, co- 
sponsors local-interest sporting events. 

l\\ SI NESS MEN: Hani's un banker-like approach has same 
format for management people as it has for small loan prospet ts, 
Imt he pitches them in minute adjacencies i<> early evening new s. 

DEPOSITOR APPEAL: Half Dollar began by creating gen- 
eral appeal with local spots in MK's Toda\. still /)/«< es them 
next to news seements so as to catch business men. as well. 



SPONsoi; 



2 \m 1959 



15 



"Please! This is bigger Ihan bo+h of us ! 









TIDEWATER, VA., indivisible for 
most marketing purposes, tops all metro county 
areas in the Southeast except Atlanta and Miami. 
Tidewater is a rich, urban area of nearly a million 
spending people, and is growing at 2*/4 times 
the national rate. 

TIDEWTAR is a better way to spell it, and the 
best way to sell it . . . for WTAR-TV is the greatest 
marketing force in this great and growing market. 




Virtually Unduplicated 

WTAR-TV • Channel 3 • Norfolk, Virginia 

Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

President and General Manager— Campbell Arnoux 
Vice President for Sales— Robert M. Lambe 
Vice President for Operations— John Peffer 






l (i si'o\M>n • - \m 1959 



.... 




***£ „ 



//, 



^' 



NEWPORT NEWS 



NORFOLK 



Hampton ^° 



\ s 



PORTSMOUTH 




SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 



17 







with the 
BIG CHEESE in Wisconsin 

Not only 34 million people 
but 2 million cows. 



WEAU-TV 

EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN 



Sell Your Product 



"WHERE MID-AMERICA 

LIVES AND BUYS..." 
I 

WICS tells and sells 
200,000 TV families in 
Illinois' Supermarket 



4:00 


THREE 


STOOGES 


PARTICIPATION 


OPEN 


LOW 


WICS 


"C" RATES 



1 



WICS 



NBC TELEVISION 
SPRINGFIELD-DECATUR 
CENTRAL ILLINOIS 



AVAILABILITIES: 
YOUNG TELEVISION 



DAY TV 

\Contd from page 33) 

urn.' One other device he likes is 
tv tape, a tool being used on the 
new On the Go which enables pro- 
ducers to gain realism b\ on-location 
and remote shooting without paving 
costly line charges. 

Tv tape is also a handy tool for 
ABC's daytime tv program v. p. 
Giraud Chester, in his bid for audi- 
ence and ratings, is stressing program 
quality. "We shake down a show 
completely before we go on the air 
and we have anywhere from one to 
three full program versions on tape 
for our guidance in seeing that we 
meet the creative needs." 

The back-filling and fence-mending 
in daytime programs goes on continu- 
ously and quietly. There's no "new 
season" with daytime; the shows go 
on like the tides or Old Man River. 
Summer means vacation rather than 
hiatus; advertisers stay on the air all 
year 'round. Audience composition 
tends to change a bit in the summer, 
because youngsters and teens are 
home, but the drop-offs in total audi- 
ences and tune-ins is nowhere near as 
severe as during the nighttime hours. 
Day tv has no summer replacements. 

The fence mending goes on eternal- 
ly with clients and agencies, too. As 
Mr. Chester comments, "We need to 
educate them to the concept that the\ 
can't judge daytime program qualit > 
by their own tastes." Daytime has a 
different audience with distinct pro- 
gram tastes and much more rigid 
viewing patterns. And a rep. com- 
menting on daytime spot, says "We 
still need to show clients that t\ i> just 
as good in the daytime as at night.' 

Network program and sales execu- 
tives are meshing together in their 
efforts to create more vehicles which 
will build audience and develop circu- 
lation of interest to a greater number 
of advertisers. One thing they've 
learned: on-thc-air promotion of their 
own shows is more effective than paid 
newspaper promotion, a typical tactic 
for nighttime programing. And 
they're airing promotion spots dur- 
ing the nighttime hours to bring in 
women viewers. 

What are housewives who do not 
watch daytime t\ doing? A Trendex 
report For Blair TV indicates during 
the morning from !'. to noon the\ are 
bus) with in this order house- 
work, listening to radio, cooking and 



eating: in th 



afternoon from noon 
to 6 p.m.. they cook, do housework, 
listen to radio and sleep. This is the 
untapped group which tv is trying to 
convert to daytime tune-in. 

Another possibilit) of increasing 
awareness and then audience hasn't 
gotten out of the think stage. One 
network man would like to reshape 
the across-the-board program sched- 
ule so that it includes a variety of five 
formats each day of the week at the 
same time. In current schedules, only 
one quarter-hour on all of the net- 
works is not a strip I ABC's Mickey 
Mouse and Adventure Time which 
alternate from 5:45 to 6 p.m. i . 

One of the biggest factors which 
encourages network program men in 
their plans for future creativity is the 
relative freedom from advertiser or 
agency control. Daytime slots are 
sponsored by several clients and no 
one has a predominant say in format. 
This gives daytime planners more lee- 
way in trying something new . 

They say "patience" is the ke\ 
word for daytime sponsors and pro- 
gramers alike. It takes patience and 
a slow-but-sure approach in building 
audiences — and patience for an ad- 
vertiser to wait for his sales figures 
to rise. But P&G and main another 
blue-chip advertiser is reaping da\- 
time rewards after slow buildups to 
sure audiences. 

The smartest advertisers, of course. 
are merchandising their daytime t\ 
properties to get maximum value in 
terms of sales even though the base 
audience is smaller than nighttime 
would deliver. 

One of the big pulses which the 
new specials format has is its adapta- 
bility to merchandising devices and 
promotional hooks. A one-shot show 
can tie in with such bonuses as spe- 
cial sales and inti oductoi \ offers. 

Daytime tv advertisers also like the 
fact that women are nearer the point 
of purchase during daytime horns 
and other products which tie in with 
homemaking duties and needs arc 
uppermost in the women s minds. 

Spot advertisers like daytime slots 
for the same reasons. Their biggest 
frustration: getting full-minute avail- 
abilities. LD.'s and chainbreaks are 
the order of today's luning but 

thej >till hopcfulK look to longer 
commercial slots for the longer sell. 
Onl\ local -how adjacencies and par- 
ticipations now give them this chance 
for longer exposure. ^T 



18 



SPONSOR 



2 mai L959 



the word's 




around../. 

and the 
word is 




When the Saturday Evening Post first intro- 
duced Ad Page Exposure (APX), the study 
was greeted by main advertising leaders as 
a major breakthrough in media research. 
Now the private acclaim has become a mat- 
ter of public recognition . . . 



sponsor • 2 m\i L959 1*> 




/ 



y 



^ 



X 






DIA A 



'::::. 



EDIA. RESEARC1 



. he Saturday Evening Post 

for pioneering the newest media measi 

AD PAGE EXPOSU 




:,() 



-I'ONSOli • 



2 may 1959 



I|A most distinguished panel of judges, from the Gelds <>l marketing, media ;m<l re- 
search, selected the \<l Page Exposure stud) from among M outstanding research 
projects for tin* First Vnnnal Media/scope Award in Media Research. 

The \P\ stud) — conducted l»\ Alfred Politz Media Studies, in consultation with the 

Advertising Research Foundation — was hailed as "the first objective measurement of 
the extent to which a magazine can place an advertisement before the public." 

Sonic significant aspects of Ad Page Exposure arc explained below: 

(c^. What docs \l'\ measure? 

i\. It measures the face-to-face contact between your advertising page and the read- 
ers of a magazine. 

(c^. Is APX, then, like Starch or Gallup-Robinson ratings? 

A.. No. VPX measures the abilit\ of a magazine to deliver readers to your ad page. 
Think of vour ad as a salesman, and APX as the number of calls that salesman makes. 

(c^. How does APX differ from audience studies? 

/V. In audience studies, a person qualifies as a "reader" if he simpl) glances inside 
the book at any editorial content. But Ad Page Exposure requires that a reader come 
face to face witli vonr advertising page. It's proved contact. 

(c^. How does the APX "reader" compare with the T\ commercial "viewer"? 

J\. I nlike T\ "viewer" ratings, which do not prove the physical presence of the 
viewer in front of the set, each Ad Page Exposure is an assured, phvsieal contact of 
reader and ad page. 

Q. What did the APX study of the Post reveal? 

i\. Politz proved that vonr ad page in the Post — a single page in a single issue — is 
exposed to Post readers more than 2 l ) million times. 

C^, \\ hat is the cost per thousand Ad Page Exposures? 

r\. ^ our cost per thousand exposures to a black-and-white page in the Post is 90c*. 
This compares with $1.96** per thousand viewer exposures for a minute commercial 
on the average nighttime network T\ program. And, of course, repeat Ad Page Expo- 
sures carry no extra charge. 

FOR APX DOCUMENTATION OF YOUR MARKET-BY AGE, SEX, INCOME, HOME 
OWNERSHIP AND OTHER CHARACTERISTICS-CALL YOUR POST SALESMAN 



29 million times each issue, someone I urns to vour ml 
page in the Post. Thai's i<l Page Exposure I il'\ ! 

'Based on onetime cost <>f a full | »;i ^r«- . black and white, and 
exposures to readers li years of age and older. 
**Based <»u an estimate of average nel cosl and bomes 
reached for all nighttime network programs "I $3.54 per 
thousand homes and an estimate of 1.8 viewers per set 1(> 
years of age anil older. 




sponsor • 2 m n L959 



51 




takes pleasure 
in announcing 

the appointment 
of 

THE 

KATZ 

AGENCY 

as their 

National 

Sales 

Representative 

Effective 

May 1, 1959 



Serving Greater 

San Antonio and 

Southwest Texas 

Markets 






National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



A' I 



52 






TV BUYS 

The National Brands, Div. of Sterling Drug, Inc. New York, is 
going into top markets throughout the countr) for its Bayer Aspirin. 
The schedules start this month, run for five \\eek~. Minute announce- 
ments during both da) and night slots are heing used: frequencies 
\ar\ from market to market. The bu\er is Bob Lazetera: the agencj 
is Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. Inc., New York. 

Crown Central Petroleum Corp., Baltimore, is entering major 
markets with summer schedules for its Crown gasolines and oil 
Area of distribution: N. Y.. Pa., N. J.. Conn.. Md., \. C. S. C. Texas, 
Va. & W. Va. The 13-week campaign starts this month. Minute an- 
nouncements during prime time are being scheduled, with frequencies 
varying. Buyer is Billie Farren ; the agency, Al Paul Lefton Co.. Phila, 
The Borden Co., Inc., New York is initiating schedules in scattered 
markets for its Instant Potato Whip. The campaign starts this month, 
runs for six weeks. Chainbreaks and minute announcements during 
both day and night periods are being slotted: frequencies depend 
upon the market. The buyer is Chips Barrabee: the agenc) is 
Lennen & Newell. Inc.. New York. 

Corn Products Refining Co., New York, i> kicking off a campaign 
in about 30 Southern markets for its Niagara Cold W ater Starch. The 
schedules start this month for a series of loin -week (lights over a 
26-week period. Minutes during daytime segments are being used: 
frequencies \ar\ from market to market. The buyer i> Bob Kutsche; 
the agency is Lennen \ Newell, Inc. New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

Sun Oil Co., Philadelphia, is preparing it^ summer campaign in top 
markets for Sunoco gasolines and oils: distribution is in 24 states 
east of the Mississippi. The schedules start HI Ma\ for a Lvweek 
run. Minute. 20- and 30-second announcements during weekend and 
traffic hours arc being purchased; frequencies depend upon the 
market. The Inner is Jim scanlan; the agencj i> Win. I\st\. V Y. 
Tetley Tea Co., Inc., New York, is lining up schedules in over 50 
markets for it- summer tea campaign. The 13-week schedules Mail 
II May. Minutes and I.D.'s during daytime periods are being 
placed: frequencies varj from market t<> market. The buyer 
i- \i t Topal; the agencj is Ogilvy, Benson & Mather. Inc. New York. 
Lever Bros., Lipton l)i\.. Hoboken, Y .).. is readying its summer 
iced tea campaign. The initial schedules start in Ma\ and June for 
eighl weeks, in about 30 southern markets. Daytime minutes and 
chainbreaks are being placed: Frequencies depend upon the market. 
BiiM-r i> Lorraine Ruggiero; agency is Young & Rubicam, Inc., N. V 



SPONSOR 



\i\i 1959 




Occupying a very 
special place is the Teias 
Children's Hospital 
dedicated to helping 
all children, regardless ot 
race, color or creed. 




AAAAA 

THE CHRONICLE STATION 

P.O. BOX 12. HOUSTON 1 . TEXAS-ABC BASIC GENERAL MANAGES 

HOUSTON CONSOLIDATED TELEVISION CO. WILLARD E. WALBR106E 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 6E0. P. HOLLINGBERY CO. COMMERCIAL MANA6ER. 

500 FIFTH AVENUE. NEW TORK 36. N.V. BILL BENNETT 



SPONSOR • 2 MAI L959 






As station values climb, SPONSOR ASKS: 



How do you determine a station's 



With station worth steadily rising 
in both major and minor markets, 
station men and a broker tell the 
yardsticks they use in appraisal 

Ted Cott, vice president, NTA o&o 

stations, New York 

Of course the immediate answer 
would probably be "It all depends on 
whether you're buying or selling." 

In a more realistic point of view 
there are so many determining fac- 
tors that it is almost impossible to 
develop a mathematical equation. 
The singular problem about the pur- 
chase of stations is the lack of plural- 
it \ of franchises; you buy a limited 
edifice. Many stations are bought not 
on the basis of their books but on the 
basis of their potential. This, togeth- 
er with the factors of supply and de- 
mand, has tended to create price 
values which are theoretically unbusi- 
nesslike. The unique fact about 
broadcasting is that the non-commer- 
cial minute that existed at 7 p.m. yes- 
terda\ ami had a two-point rating 
and for which there were no takers 
could, with the proper programing, 
have a 15-point rating the following 
month, and thus an inventon which 
would have to be written down one 
month at zero would have a price of 
v iOO the follow ing month. 

It is this, of course, that makes 
show business exciting, if to some 



// hat can 

be done 

it till station 
is hasic 

bankers slightlj unprofessional. Yet, 
time after time, the historj books "I 
broadcasting arc replete with the 
stories ol the slalioiis whose charac- 
ter, programing and income have 
i hanged drasl icall) w iih the proper 
appi oach. I lnis the real determina- 
tion l"i the \alue ol the station is 




what the new owner can do with it: 
what increment he can make with it. 
So much of this is based on experi- 
ence, faith, courage and considera- 
tions of the market and its potential, 
it would seem to me that network- 
franchised stations have reached a 
peak in price; that while profits of 
substantial size are made and will 
continue to be made with them, the 
real opportunity for the future for 
increment is in the area of the in- 
dependent stations. This type of sta- 
tion is beginning to come into its 
own, gaining audience and sponsor 
strength rapidly, and there are many 
who believe that the tv independent 
may very well follow the historical 
pattern of radio broadcasting where 
the top prices for stations today are 
paid for the independents and not for 
network affiliates. 

The real way to determine a pur- 
chase price is not so much on what it 
is doing as what it can do and what 
you believe you can do with it. The 
girl who lived across the railroad 
tracks and was smart enough to mar- 
r\ the millionaire soon gets very com- 
fortable in a Park Avenue apartment. 

Ray V. Hamilton, pres. of Hamilton. 

l.anilis S: Issoi -.. Inc. 
\llhough a broadcast property, to 
l lie initiated, may seem to consist in 
large part of intangibles, actually 
there are a number of well-defined 
factors by which a facility is evalu- 
ated. Although these criteria can be 
set forth on paper. lhe\ l>\ no means 
approach a formula. The human 
element plays too large a part; so 
much depends on the good judgment 
ol the appraiser. Experience in pin- 
chase and sale of stations, or its ne- 
gotiation, phis deep-rooted experience 
and knowledge of the broadcast in- 
dustry are mandator) requisites of 
successful -lai ion pricing. 

Our national media brokerage 
firm. Hamilton. Landis & Assoc.. Inc.. 
wiili foui offices located in Washing- 
ton. Chicago. Dallas and San Fran- 



cisco are in constant touch with buy- 
ers and sellers of properties on a na- 
tional scale. We are called upon to 
do appraisals on radio and tv stations 
in all sections of the country. I, my- 
self have been in the radio business 
for 29 years, and this is my 13th year 
in media brokerage. 

In evaluating a tv or radio prop- 
ert\ for sale, there are innumerable 



Market size 




is a prime 
consideration 



facets to be considered. In my opin- 
ion, these factors can be classified in 
six controlling categories: 

1 I Gross income. Station income 
comes from three primary sources: 
national spot, local and regional, and 
network. Other sources include pel 
litical. 

2 1 Profit and cash flow. Natural- 
h gross income has an important 
bearing on profit levels, but operating 
efficiency and good management play 
a part in the rate of return, (ash 
flow, or the timely arrival of accounts 
receivable, is also significant. 

A well-balanced property should 
have its income balanced as follows: 
25 to 30% from national spot. 00', 
derived from local and regional, and 
from 10 to l.V, from network. I If 
this is an independent operation, then 
local and national will absorb net- 
work revenue I . 

3 1 Market and facility. The sira 
of the market i- of prime importance 
because it largelj determines a sta- 
tion's circulation its chief asset as 
an aiKertising medium. The stations 
share of audience is significant for 
the same reason. Other factors in- 
clude network affiliation or program 
formal if independent and strength of 
the competit ion. 

1 1 Ivailabilif) of buyers. This is 



".I 



SPONMIK 



2 \m 1959 



■ 



RESPONSES POUR IN AS 



price 



mother wav oi expressing the law oi 
>u|i|)K and demand, which will al- 
■ays allcrt pricing in a free market. 

5 i Terms and conditions. Easj 
firms ma\ allow an operator t<> price 
hi- station higher. Conversely, a 
transaction which requires a bigh 
proportion of cash would have a low- 
ei selling [nice. 

(> i Labor contracts. The degree 
of unionization and intensity of la- 
bor demands, as reflected in payrolls 
and large staffs natural!) affect sell- 
ing price. 

\\ ithin the past three or lour 
Sears, financial sources alien to ra- 
dio and t\. attracted 1>\ the 10-30' I 
profit i depending on efficiency) be- 
t«nc taxes, bave begun to invest ln-a\ i- 
ly. Based on activity during the past 
fi\e years, the future is the brightest 
of all lime. 

Wm. L. Putnam, president, If WLP, 
Springfield, Mass. 

There are so many facets involved 
in the purchase of a tv property that 
it's not easj to categorize them in 
order of their comparative impor- 
tance. 

To nn mind however, the most im- 
portant single area in contemplating 



Believability 

is most 

important 

iactor 



the do or ilon t buys ol a t\ property, 
is an intangible. That is the general 
feeling that the previous management 
ha- [eft in the minds of the t\ audi- 
ence in that particular market. 

Ihis is a thing we call "believ- 
ability." If the general conduct of 
the previous station management has 
led to a definite indication of audi- 
ence loyalty, has a track record of 
( Please turn to page 7(> i 




Young's "Advertiser 
Area Project" Gets 
Into High Gear 



lit 

Adam Young 



Ad agencies and advertisers are demonstrating 

eagerness to have a \oicc in dclermininji '"Adver- 
tiser Areas"' for radio audience measurement 
purposes. 

The Pulse. Inc. advises receipt of several hundred 
replies to our questionnah e. 



SPONSOR 



2 mvy 1959 



Among those present (soon after the mailing): Benton & Bowles; Young 

\ Rubicam: Leo Burnett: Ted Hales; Maischalk \ Pratt: Kenyon & Eckhardt; 
(Mian & Bronner: Fletcher 1). Richards: Hicks \ (ini-t: MacManus. John & 
Vdains: l.cnnen \ Newell: Reach. McClinton: lien Sackheim: llenrv J. Kauf- 
man: BBDO: Bozell & Jacobs; Ralph Jones: McCann-Frickson: Western \d- 
vertising: Norman. Craig, & Kuiumel: Kudner: Fuller & Smith & Ross: Daniel 
Sullivan: Bruce Brewer: Tucker Wayne: Whitman Company; French & 
Shield-: J. M. Mathes; Keyes & Adams. 

The early response gratifies us. strengthens our conclusion about the need 
for and significance of this pioneer step. The industry appear- now to be well 
on the way toward truly valid and helpful Advertiser Areas. 

To recap briefly: On maps of Tulsa and Pittsburgh, pilot market- in this 
experiment, we a-ked media research folks to approve one of several suggested 
areas of interest ... or to create better ones. 

Pulse will forward compromise areas to participating agencies and adver- 
tisers for final approval and comment. When agreement is complete, Pulse 
will survey the new "Advertiser Areas.'" and issue results to all Pulse sub- 
scribers and participants. Fventuallv. we hope this practice will be extended 
to every market Pulse surveys on a regular basis. 

WHAT THE PROJECT SIGNIFIES. We believe audience surveys must 

tell not onlv numbers of people, but where thev are. \s we've pointed out 
here, often a station's audience can represent scattered numbers of people 
-pread far beyond the "market-merchandising" area the advertiser care- about. 
Meanwhile, another station mav be effective entirelv within that area. How 
can you compare their effectiveness unless (1) you agree on the vital area to 
be studied and (2) v mi find out the listening storv in that area." 

IT hen these two steps are complete, we will all be well on our wav to the 
kind of clarity so necessary to radio selling (and buying) today. And for 

their participation in this significant work, we thank all who are giving "I 
their interest, time and thought in our effort to arrive at the truth. 

ADAM YOUNG INC. 

Representing all that's modern and effective in radio today 

NEW YORK (3 E. 54TH ST.) • ATLANTA • CHICAGO • DETROIT 
LOS ANGELES • ST. LOUIS • SAN FRANCISCO 

AFFILIATED WITH: Y0UNC TELEVISION CORPORATION & YOUNG CANADIAN LTD. 



55 



RCA 5KW FM TRANSMITTER 

TYPE BTF-5B 
DESIGNED FOR MULTIPLEXING AND REMOTE CONTROL 



THIS NEW FM TRANSMITTER is designed for 
both conventional and multiplex operation. 
Outstanding performance features such as, a 
direct FM system, built-in remote control pro- 
visions, screen voltage power output control, 
and many others, make the BTF-5B today's 
best FM transmitter buy. 

ADEQUATE COVERAGE — Its 5000-watt power 
output provides adequate coverage of a multi- 
plex channel and improved coverage for conven- 
tional operation. The high power level permits 
the use of low-gain antennas to achieve a 
high ERP. 

UNIQUE EXCITER— New FM Exciter, Type 
BTE-10B, uses "Direct FM" modulator cir- 
cuits, thus fewer tubes are required. Automatic 
frequency control system with frequency 
detector prevents off frequency operation. 

MULTIPLEX ACCESSORIES— Subcarrier gener- 
ators for multiplex operation are available as 
optional equipment. There is room inside the 
new transmitter for mounting one of these 
generators. Exciter and subcarrier generators 
are also available as separate items for use with 
existing FM transmitters. 

BROADBAND ANTENNA— New antenna 
designed to meet low VSWR requirements of 
multiplex system is available, along with a 
complete line of FM accessories. 



For all your FM needs call your mans! 
RCA Broadcast Representative, or writt to 
RCA, Dept. T-264, Camden, N. •/. 

IN CANADA: 
RCA VICTOR Company Limited, Montreal 




OUTSTANDING FEATURES OF THE BTF-5B 

• Designed for Remote Control 

• Direct FM System 

• Designed for Multiplexing 

• Fewer Tubes and Tuned Circuits 

• Built-in Oscilloscope for Easy Tuning 

• Choice of Colors 

• Matching Rack Available for Accessories 
and Additional Subcarrier Generator 




RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 



Tmk(») ® 



BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT 
CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 



I 



2 MAY 1959 

Copyright IIM 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



I liis is u time for the jelling «»l many complicated matters which will have far* 
reaching effects on the future of television. 

In tlie space of one week, give or take a couple of days, there were these three separate, 
but very important developments at the FCC. 

1) The Commission told Congress that it looks with favor on something very much like 
the ABC "drop-in" plan for temporary solution of the problem of getting more tv stations on 
the air. The preferred long-range solution would be trading spectrum space with the mili- 
tary, so tv would wind up with 5U continuous vhl t\ channels. Hut the FCC said it would 
settle for 25 channels. 

2) The deadline passed for arguments for and against banning network spot sales rep- 
resentation of non-owned stations. 

3) Wheels were set in motion for changes in option time rules. 

The Barrow Report, rising out of the studies of the FCC's network study staff, didn't 
ring many bells with the Commissioners. Nevertheless, the Barrow Report has hcen 
marching on. Proceedings are under way to modify option time, to probe network pro- 
graming practices, to delve into the spot rep picture. And more are undoubtedly on the way. 

With a Justice-Court veto power to face, the FCC has been taking the Barrow Report 
much more seriously than it intended to do. 

(For more on option time rules see SPONSOR-SCOPE and article, page 36.) 



Established \ lit stations are unhappy with the FCC's report to the Senate Com- 
merce Committee on tv allocations. 

Ilie\ feel dropping-in and squeezing-in more stations at reduced mileage separations will 
cause interference and "degrade" present service. The Association of Maximum Service Tele- 
casters held an emergency meeting and will fight this solution tooth-and-nail. 

The FCC thinks it will know within a few months whether it can, in fact, trade spectrum 
space with the military. Perhaps even whether it dares to hope for as many as 50 competitive 
channels or, at the worst, 25. 

The Station Reps Association told the FCC that the networks enter a ""conflict 
of interest" situation when they represent non-owned stations on national spot, 
since national spot competes with network business. 

Somewhat aside from the subject, the reps accused the radio networks of unfair competi- 
tion through offering "bargain basement prices." 

CBS and NBC, in hot retorts, said they represent very few non-owned stations, but repre- 
sent them well. There can be no monopoly in view of the fact that the represented stations 
are so few and in view of the fact that the webs will not accept more. 

The networks said the FCC has no legal right to interfere with the free choice of stations 
of the spot reps they prefer. 

The independent reps charged that the strong network bargaining position gives them a 
competitive advantage when seeking contracts. 

In another shot, the independents said that the chief concern of networks is the welfare 
of the whole network organization, not the welfare of represented stations. 



SPONSOR 



2 MAT 1959 



57 




Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



2 MAY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The 1959 fall programing sweepstakes has started: close to 30 new shows will 
be offered with the mystery-delective type of show setting a main trend. 

Here are the shows these distributors will be selling, in some cases trying the network 
route before putting the show in syndication: 

ABC Films: The Racers (A) and Simon Lash (M). 

CBS Films: Silent Saber (D), House on K Street (M), Diplomat 1 1)), Man From An- 
tibes (M) and Theater for a Story (D). 

CNP: Provost Sergeant (A) and Pony Express (A). 

Flamingo: Deadline (D), Juvenile Hearing and Rendezvous with Adventure (A). 

ITC: Interpol (M) and Ding Dong School. 

MCA: Coronada9 (M). 

Official: Western Union, Police Station, International Detective, Criminal at Large, An- 
chorage (D), Mustang, Snowfire, Thoroughbred and What Are The Odds? 

Bernard Schubert: Mr. and Mrs. North (M) and Counterspy (M). 

Screen Gems: Stakeout (A), Undercover Car (M) and Seven League Boots (A). 

Note: (A) indicates action-adventure, (D) drama, and (M) mystery-detective. 



A Schwerin study on regional likes and dislikes in program types came up with 
data that may mean more headaches for syndication selling. 

A two-year study done in New York and Kansas City showed a big difference in atti- 
tudes towards Westerns, and smaller differences on other program types. 

Here's how strongly, or otherwise, viewers favor these program types, in two sample 
markets : 

NEW YORK KANSAS CITY 



TYPE 

Westerns 
Comedies 
Mysteries 
Dramas 



28% 
41% 
40% 
46% 



48% 
46% 

47% 
46% 



Incidentally, in May Schwerin will also go into the Los Angeles area in regular regional 
tests on preferences. 

You can expect United Artists to make the plunge into syndication selling with- 
in a month. 

With a sales nucleus composed of Phil Williams, formerly of ABC Films, and Kurt Blum- 
berg, ex-lTC, UA-TV will be ready for regional operations, although there's not yet a field syn- 
dication force of any size. 

The Dennis O'Keefe show or the Vikings, each now making network rounds, ma\ lie I lA'i 
first for syndication, but it's also possible that Hudson's Bay and Miami Undercover will be 
pitched at local-regional buyers. 

Four late evening half hours a week will open up for syndication on AB<: TV 
affiliated stations this summer when John Daly moves from 10:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. 

While Wednesday night will remain network, the other four nights will be open lor new 
tvndicated shows and off-network runs: WABC-TV, New York, for example, will put llescue 8 
and Behind Closed Doors into 10:30 p.m. slots. 



58 



SPONSOR 



2 m*y 1959 




FILM-SCOPE continued 



additional facta on what to expect from videotape were unveiled 1»> Howard S. 
Meighan, bead of Videotape Productions, last week, touching on tnete urcan: 

Coverage: At least one tape-equipped station now covers 70'< of L.S. iv homes; you 
can expect this to reach 84'/o hy September. 

Program production: A rule of thumb on tape savings under (dm for half-hours is 
this $9,000- 10,000 per program episode. Also, look fur sequence systems to be set up for 
continuous four-camera shooting of entire scenes, either indoors or outside. 

Commercials: Studio production costs so far seem to be running 25-50/t, le^s on tape 
than film; it's too early to tell what costs on remotes will be. 

Raw tape: There may be an eventual 50% cut in the price of raw tape, but it will take 
one to five years for this to happen. 

Spring starting dates iu syndication this year require that a new show rely 
heavily on pre-8:00 p.m. time periods. 

Of 59 markets Amoco wanted for its first syndication buy with CBS Films' U. S. Border 
Patrol, 32 were cleared before 8:00 p.m., 15 were slotted between 8:00-11:00 p.m., and 
12 are still lacking a firm time period. The two time periods cleared most often were 7:00- 
7:30 p.m. and 7:30-8:00 p.m. 

One-third of Ampex videotape recorders delivered anywhere in the world by 
the end of last month ended up in the three key production cities of New York, 
Los Angeles and Chicago. 

The ten cities with the most Ampex tape recorders at the close of March included the 
following: New York, 53; Los Angeles, 42; Chicago, 14; London, 13; Yokahama, Japan, 13; 
Alberta, Canada, 8; Manchester, England, 5; Kansas City, 4; Cleveland, 4; Mexico City, 4. 



COMMERCIALS 



Commercials have a tremendous impact on people's taste and commercial pro- 
ducers can influence this taste if they abide by certain don'ts. 

Steve Elliot, of Elliot, Unger & Elliot, offered the following list of don'ts in a talk he 
made in Chicago last week. 

1) Don't offend. "Sell hard— but sell nice." 

2) Don't cast the "girl next door" type, especially when professional fashion models do 
a more effective job. 

3) Don't use sets, props, tides and opticals indiscriminately. Follow the concept demand- 
ed by the whole commercial. 

4) Don't chuck in music to fill gaps. Evoke the right image to augment the message 
and mood. 

5) Don t ignore the producer on creative problems. 

6) Don't be chained to the bid system. Fix a price: the producer who wants more will 
turn down the assignment. 

7) Don't use bad tv ads to move merchandize when it means losing friends for the 
product. 

The importance of theatre-screen commercials in overseas markets is shown 
by Revlon's $15,000 one-minute commercial produced last week by Robert Law- 
rence Productions. 

Shot in color, the spot is destined for dubbing into 14 languages for tv and theatre ex- 
posure in 62 countries outside the U.S. 

• 2 may 1959 59 



2 MAY 1959 
owrriikt km 

(POMOK 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



W SPONSOR HEARS 



The head of a tv/radio rep firm this week got a phone solicitation for a sub- 
scription to Life magazine. When he asked why he should subscribe, he got this 
answer:: 

"So you can get leads for new business.' 



A young tv v. p. in a Madison Avenue agency has devised a clever gimmick that 
makes his presence indispensable at high-level account meetings. 

He omits a page or two from a memo or report so that he has to be called in. 



t 



MCA has allocated $250,000 per annum for a figure of outstanding stature in 

show business to head up the producing of the Ford 60-90-minute series on NBC TV. 

Of major importance will be his effectiveness as a link between the show and Detroit. 



One of the trade's biggest puzzles this year has been the bouncing antics of 
Oldsmobile. 

The quick jumps: from Patti Page to (1) a live musical drama to (2) a situation 
comedy to (3) the optioning of the Sunday 7:30-8 p.m. period on CBS TV for a show not 
yet determined. 



60 



Charles (Kevlon) Revson remains resolute ou his principle against allowing a 
commission on a tv program package. 

Not only don't his agencies collect a commission on programs but the same bar ap- 
plies to a talent organization producing a program for Revlon. 



Midwest reps note that the timebuying ranks are being taken over more and 
more by comparative youngsters — in some cases because of salary differentials. 

The reps are accepting it as a growing obligation: Teaching these newcomers the bas- 
il s of air media strategy. Also a restraint: Not trying to swa\ their judgments. 



If you hear of a Hollywood studio running into difficulties with its tv output, 
you can attribute it to spreading creative manpower too thin. 

A single production source — especially when it has several shows already on the as- 
sembly line — can't help running into a shortage of high-level producer, writer, and direc- 
tor ingenuity during the peaks. 

Remember in the heyday of radio when practically every cereal advertiser 
sweetened the appeal with premiums for the kids? 

That gambit, say the admen in the field, isn't at all necessary with tv. There's suffi- 
cient sales pressure in the recommendation of a show's personality — whether it be live, 
cartoon, or whatnot. 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1059 






the \Vk BILLION 
WSMpire 




"WSM Helps William Esty Clients Keep Pace with the 
Growing Central South ..." 

Says Well Known Broadcast Expert, Richard C. Grahl 

The WSMpire story is a familiar one to 

Dick Grahl (shown above with Blair's Lou Faust) 

and the entire William Esty Company organization. 

Through the years many Esty clients have used 

the unique selling power of WSM with excellent 

results. To cite one example. Prince Albert Tobacco 

has sponsored a half-hour of WSM's world famous 

Grand Ole Opry on WSM for the past 20 years! 



Are you keeping pace, saleswise. with the growing 

Central South? If not, better find out how much 

WSM can do for you in the fabulous $2% Billion 

WSMpire. Bob Cooper or any Blair man can give 
you facts, figures, and case histories. 



WSM 

Radio 

Key to America's 
13th Radio Market 

50 000 Watts • Clear Channel 
Blair Represented 
Bob Cooper, Gen. Mgr 



OWNED AND OPERATED dY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 61 






■ m*-m WmW u ^r 



■ m Bhbb ' 



FURNITURE 

SPONSOR: Essex Furniture Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: In a special campaign, the Essex 
turniture Company of Lawrence, Mass., ran 10 announce- 
ments per day for one week via WCCM. Results were 
instantaneous. The store, which has been in business in 
Lawrence for 24 years, never had as much traffic as during 
the period that its announcements were broadcast over 
WCCM. Customers bought from the Essex Furniture Co.. 
items specifically advertised over the radio station. Results 
were so good that the same schedule was continued for an 
additional seven days, and again continued for a third 
flight. Morris Davis, owner of the Essex Furniture Co. has 
since become a regular advertiser on the station. Davis 
particularly liked the "alive sound that WCCM disk jockeys 
had when doing his spots." He said they created tremendous 
enthusiasm and added a certain personal touch, which en- 
hanced the announcements. New schedules run for the year. 

WCCM, Lawrence, Mass. Announcements 



FLORIST AND NURSERY 

SPONSOR: Parkland Florist & Nursery AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: On Easter Sunday morning, at 8: 15 
a.m., the Parkland Florist & Nursery of Columbia. South 
Carolina, phoned the announcer on duty at WMSC. The 
I'arkland executive said he needed advertising fast: he was 
overloaded with Easter lily plants and orchid corsages. He 
had been advertising them since midday Friday in news- 
papers and other media with little success. Within 20 min- 
utes, WMSC had the first 30-second announcement on the 
air, and a total of 10 were run before 1 I a.m. Falkland 
florist is in a high traffic location, and easily accessible to 
any point in the greater Columbia area. Consequently, the 
copy approach was based on cash-and-carry at only a slight- 
ly reduced price from regular deliver) price. Falkland noted 
that the first customer drove in within l.~> seconds after the 
first announcement was aired. Parkland not onl) sold ever) 
corsage and lil\ in Stock, bul obtained additional merchan- 
dise from wholesalers and entirel) sold out this stock, too. 

\\ MSC, Columbia Announcements 



62 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 



2HJ Lb I ^} 



MARKET 

SPONSOR : Herbert Young Market AGENCY : Direct 

Capsule case history: Herbert Young Market of Philadel- 
phia used spot radio on WHAT, and the results were phe- 
nomenal. The schedule consisted of minute announcements 
throughout the day, with ad-lib comments by WHAT air 
personalities. In one weekend the market sold 2,400 pounds 
of coffee, over 3,500 pounds of sugar and their meat busi- 
ness increased by one-third. Said Herbert Young, president 
of the Market, "Be assured that we will be on WHAT for 
mam months to come. When a radio station can sell for us 
like WHAT has done, we'd be mighty foolish to make any 
change. The advertising dollars invested has returned a 
tremendous dividend.'' Young went on to say that the sta- 
tion used a personalized approach that made the campaign 
more effective. Many people from Philadelphia and the 
surrounding communities mentioned hearing the announce- 
ments on Lloyd Fatmans P.M. Show. Regular schedules set 

WHAT, Philadelphia Announcement! 






REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT 

SPONSOR: Vero Lake Estates AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Vero Lake Estates, a real estate 
development in Vero Beach. Florida, has enjoyed unusual 
success in their advertising campaign on WELL New Haven. 
In fact, radio pulled much better than any other medium in 
this campaign. "I had anticipated that the people in this 
area were 'Florida-minded, but the results of our advertis 
ing on WELI have out-run all expectations." stated Ronald 
M. Ansin, president of the New England office of the real Q 
estate firm. He further commented on the quality of the 
radio audience reached, noted that the prospects were in- 
telligent, economically-secure people — the type for whom 
Florida holds maximum appeal. Ansin stands at the WELI 
switchboard while his announcement is on the air, watchw 
the leads come in to the station operator, and then calls the 
people hack immediately. He noted that the responses 
were phoned in from an area of "about three to four thou- 
sand square miles, one of the best responses we've had. 
WEI. I. N.» Haven Announcement! 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 



■ : ^ 






Which of the following words 
describes each of these radio stations: 
Friendly? Unfriendly? 

The special qualitative survey below, prepared by PULSE, is 
mighty revealing. A rousing majority of Washington, D. C. area 
residents found us friendly — scored us far higher than any other 
radio station in the market. And far fewer respondents had no 
reaction at all to WWDC. Q.E.D.— we're known and liked. 
Q.E.D.— this friendliness will rub off on your product! 



AH figures indicate percentages 



Radio Washington 



WWDC 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 





WWDC 

77.8 

2.4 

19.8 


Sta.A 


Sta.B 


Sta.C 


Sta.D 


Sta. E 


Sta. F 


Sta. G 




Friendly 


63.1 


33.2 


50.5 


30.0 


36.3 


49.8 


59.9 




Unfriendly 


2.4 


2.2 


1.0 


.8 


3.4 


1.2 


1.0 




Don't Know 


34.5 


64.6 


48.5 


69.2 


60.3 


49.0 


39.1 





PONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 



63 



WRAP-UP 



NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



HERITAGE OF THE CLEVELAND INDIANS, recorded, for the first time, on this long- 
playing disk is presented by creator Charlie Getz (r), p.r. dir., KYW, Cleveland, to (I to r) 
club's gen. mgr. Frank Lane; Amer. League pres. Joe Cronin; club's board chmn. William Daley 




HERE'S HOW IT'S DONE. Ted Steele, of WMCA, New York airs a private broadcast 
at the Memorial Center for Women. Demonstration was a result of a winning Center 
letter on why he should do his show there during the recent Conelrad civil defense test 




ADVERTISERS 



Colgate will be expanding into 
the proprietary and ethical drug 
business. 

The company's first move in this 
direction will he with proprietary 
items, followed by the acquisition of 
a "small ethical drug house." 

Campaigns: 

• Warner-Lambert's Fizzies, the 

effervescent soft-drink tablet intro- 
duced in mid-season last year, is 
launching "one of the most intensive 
saturation tv campaigns ever aimed 
at the children's market." The pro- 
motion, to run through 31 August, 
will include local children's shows 
such as Popeve. Little Rascals. Robin 
Hood and Bugs Bunny, plus CBS 
TV's Contain Kangaroo. In all. a 
total of 225 stations in 120 markets 
will he used, to be backed by print. 
Total ad budget: $5 million. 

• American Motors began driving 
its Rambler into the homes last 




GETTING INTO THE ACT: Post Master 
James Smith (I), carrier Ed Hollerman search 
the mail for WCAE's (Pittsburgh) "Hidden 
Hide Away'' cards — station's latest contest 













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£ m 


Bl* 






i ]k_ 


^K^J^HI^I ^^^^^ff 


FOR 


YOUR V 


IEWING PLEASURE. This 


giant tv screen b 


edecked with Southern belles, 


won 


KFDM-TV, 


Beaumont, Tex. first priio 


in th 


e Neches 


River Festival float parade 




SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 | 



week via a saturation i\ Bpot cam- 
paign concentrated on Friday eve- 
lings. Reason: V a traffic builder 
for Saturdays, the biggest shopping 
da\ in auto showrooms. The cam- 
paign i> geared in 76 ke\ Rambler 
markets, emploj ing an average of i\\c 
light-second I.I) s and two 60-second 
commercials everj Friday night on 
feme 170 station-. Agency: Geyer, 
\ 1 . . 1 1 ■ \ . Madden \ Ballard. 

General Motors lias a new direc- 
tor of tv advertising: Gail Smith, 
brmerl) associate manager ol adver- 
tising production for l'\(i. 

He will join the stall of William 
Hufstader. v.p. in charge of distribu- 
tion at General Motors. 

More personnel moves: Mort 
Green, appointed director of t\ and 
radio for Revlon, Inc. ... I). M. 
Marshman. Jr.. a v.p. and creative 
director at (,.. J. La Roche, joins 

Warner- Foundation- a- v.p. and di- 
rector ol advertising and promotion 
. . . Mien Smith, to special prod- 



ucts advertising manager of liulma 
. . . V* i 1 1 i it in Kink, to -ales manager, 
professional products, for OHKadio 
Industries, Inc. . . . William Hunter. 
to genera] Bales manager of Gonsel 
Division of Young Spring \ Wire 
Corp., Burbank, Gal. 



AGENCIES 



"Agencies must v\ork harder 
than ever before to deliver a 

quality program without heing 
trapped bv talent costs that won't 
fit into the advertiser's budget," 
according to Campbell-Ewald's 
Philip 1 • McHugh. 

Addressing the lOlli \nnual \t- 

lanta Advertising Institute, the De- 
troit agenc\ \.p. lor t\ radio said: 

"Network t\ s strength as an ad- 
vertising medium is -erioush threat- 
ened h\ a continuing lack of "some 
real method for developing new. 
young personalities to increase to- 
day's scarce talent pool and to re- 



place t\ personalities mow in declin- 
ing -i. i^e- id iriewei popularity. 

The |A'», at it- White Sulphui 

Springs convention, Bel up a Opera- 
tions Committee, to meet monthl) 
when the hoard i- not in session. 

Iliv members: Chairman, Rob- 
ert Ganger, chairman of the board 
and ol the executive committee oj 
l).\rc\. and IV- chairman: Ha IT) 
Harding, executive v.p., Y&R and 
IV- vice-chairman; Andrew Mel- 
drum, v.p. -genera] manager, Mel- 
drum \ I' in smith, I lev eland and 
l\- secretary -treasurer; Frederic 
Gamble, I \ - president. 

I Ik- dine tm --at-Lu i;e on tin- com- 
mittee: Edwin Cox, chairman, KM ; 
Otto Kleppner, partner. The Kleppnei 
Co.; and Raymond Sullivan, chair- 
man, SSC&B. 

Agencj appointments: \ll prod- 
ucts id Armour & Co.'e newly- 
liu med ( Irocei \ I >i\ ision, billing ap- 
proximately $3.5 million, i" Foote, 
Cone «!C Belding. The agenc) now 



J. CONVENTION FLANNERS: (I tor) Bill Stewart, Ston Stations; 

|Bob Larsen, WRIT, Milwaukee; Paul Berlin, KNUZ, Houston; Joe Smith, 

ILD, Boston; Paul Cowley, WKLO, Louisville; Ira Cook, KMPC, Holly- 

od; Robin Seymour, WKMH, Detroit; Tom Edwards, WERE, Cleveland 




FOR BETTER HUMAN RELATIONS, Lloyd Yoder (r), v.p. NBC 
nd head, WMAQ & WBNQ, Chicago, gets award from Earl Dawson, 

pres., Lincoln U. Watching, Dr. A. Pride (c) chmn., jnlsm. dept., Mrs. 
rthur O. Sulzberger (I), whose husband got like award for N.Y. Times. 





THERE'VE BEEN SOME CHANGES MADE, is what these gals say 
in Memphis streets to announce KWEM's call letters change to K-WAM 



65 



WHEELING 

37t* h TV 

MARKET 

* Television Magazine 8/1/58 

One Station Sells Big 
Booming Ohio Valley 



NO. 11 IN A SERIES 

ALUMINUM 




Right in the heart of the prosperous 36- 
county WTRF-TV area is the massive 
aluminum rolling mill of the Olin Mathie- 
son Chemical Corporation at Hannibal, 
Ohio. It will reach full production this 
year with a yearly capacity of 120,000,000 
pounds of rolled aluminum products, such 
as aluminum plate, sheet and coils. The 
thousand employees are a vital statistic 
for alert advertisers in the WTRF-TV area 
where 2 million people have an annual 
spendable income of 2'/2 billion dollars, 
an area where WTRF-TV influences buyers 
in 425,196 homes. 

For complete merchandising service and 
availabilities, call Bob Ferguson, VP 
and General Mgr., at CEdar 2-7777. 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Company 



wt rf t v 

Wheeling 7, West Vo. 

316,000 warts W Q fj network color 



has Armour Dial Soap. Dial Sham- 
poo, Liquid Chiffon and other soap 
and detergent account. The new di- 
\ ision includes shelf-size canned 
meats and Dash Dog Food. Aver, 
the previous agency for the latter, 
will continue to handle other Armour 
food products . . . Bristol-Myers Ban 
deodorant, hilling $2 million, from 
BBDO, where it had been since its 
inception, to Ogilvy, Benson & 
Mather. BBDO continues with B-M's 
Trig and Trushay . . . Hampden- 
Harvard Breweries of Willimansett. 
Mass., to Cohen & Aleshire, New 
York . . . Oscar Mayer & Co. is not 
leaving Wherry, Baker & Tihlen, 
Chicago. 

More on appointments: Econom- 
ics Laboratory, Inc., whose products 
include Soilax, Electrasol, and Soil- 
off cleansers, and institutional adver- 
tising, billing $1.5 million, from J. 
M. Mathes, to Kastor, Hilton, 
C,C&A . . . Mytinger & Casselberry, 
distribtuors of Nutrilite Food Sup- 
plement, billing $1 million, from 
JWT to Donahue & Coe, Los An- 
geles . . . Waterman-Bic Corp., suc- 
cessor to the Waterman Pen Co., re- 
turns to E. T. Howard Co., New T 
York. The account had been with 
the agency since 1890's and was lost 
in 1930 . . . Otarion Listener Cor]).. 
w hose account was divided between 
J. M. Mathes and the Biddle Co.. has 
put it all with the Biddle Co., Chi- 
cago . . . General Acceptance 
Corp., finance company, to Brown 
& Butcher, New York . . . Vierline 
Steel Works, Chicago, to Don Kemp- 
er Co., New York . . . Permachem 
Corp.. to Fletcher Richards, Cal- 
kins & ll«>l<l. ii . . . Red L Foods. 
Great Neck, L. I., to Smith-Green- 
land Co., New York . . . Blitz Wein- 
hard Co. of Portland, to Johnson 
& Lewis, San Francisco. 

They were elected v.p.'s: Kohert 
Johnson, al D'Arc) . . . John Mal- 
loy. al Warwick \ Legler . . . James 
Thompson, al SSC&B . . . Edward 
Ney, al ^ &R . . . G. Newton Odell. 
at the Joseph Kai/ Co. . . . Robert 
Bullen, at the Don Kemper Co., 
( hicago. 

More personnel news: Alfred 
Seaman, who resigned last week as 
executive v.p. and creative director of 
( ompton, joins SSC&B as vice-chair- 
man of the board and chairman ol 



the executive committee . . . Ed- 
mund Ridley, a v.p. at Anderson & 
Cairns, elected to the board of direc- 
tors . . . William E. (Pete) Mat- 
thews. ^l&R director of media rela- 
tions and planning, appointed to the 
board of directors of World Wide In- 
formation Services . . . Thomas Lux, 
to media-merchandising coordinator 
in the Chicago office of Grant . . . 
Phil Wasserman to publicity direc- 
tor of Reach, McClinton . . . John 
Bowen, to account executive at B&B 
. . . Mike Fabian, to account execu- 
tive at The Zakin Co. . . . John 
Heaney. Jr.. to public relations di- 
rector of Grant. New York. 

Resignation: T. Anderson. Jr., 

from chairman of the board at \n- 
derson & Cairns, to devote full time 
to his marketing counsel activities. 



FILM 



A flurry of activity by smaller 
producers and packagers in the 
film field the past week contin- 
ued to point up a brighter atti- 
tude for syndication this fall. 

Film program plans were reported 
b\ the following: 

• Marek Windheim, ex-D'Arcy ex- 
ecutive, will independently produce a 
tv series based on the Judge Parker 
comic strips. 

• Destinj Productions was formed 
in Los \ngeles and will shoot If lid 
Blue ) ontler. 

• Al Kane productions of Phila- 
delphia will do a series on General 
George C. Patton. 

Sales: WHY New York, reports 
11 station sales on its own documen- 
tary. Cold War — Berlin Crisis, as fol- 
lows: WBZ-TV, Boston: WJZ-TV, 
Baltimore; WGN-TY. Chicago: 
WHTC-TV. Hartford: Wl'MH-TV, 
Indianapolis: KTTY. Los \ngeles; 
WITI-TV, Milwaukee: VIVA-TV. 
Minneapolis WSM-TV. Nashville; 
\\ DS1 -TV, New Orleans: and \KTV. 
San Diego . . . Screen Gems made a 
five-year re-run pact on Rin Tin Tin 
with General Mills . . . Ziv's Cisco 
kill renewed in southeast regional to 
II. \\ . I.a\ potato .hip- . . . Tra 
Lux's EB films to \\ FA \T\ . Dallae 
and \\ REX-TV. Rockford . . . Walter 
Schwimmer's Ul-Star Golf sold to 
Arabian-American Oil Co. for recre- 
ation room showing in that country. 



(,., 



Sl'ONSOK 



2 \m 1059 



Program*: Goodson-Todman will 
produce a western this fall penned 
b) members of the Western Writers 
of America Association; to qualify 
members must ha\ e w i itten three n<>\ - 
els, 30 i\ shows or 200 magazine 
.-lories. 

Truth* iiotrs: Robert Young ol 
Screen Gems' Father Knows Best to 

address the Canadian Highwaj Safe- 
ly Conference . . . SMPTE Conven- 
tion in New York to discuss multi- 
lingual film technique . . . NTA's 
Oliver Unger told the Advertising 
Club of Chicago last week thai he 
visualized a happ) Euture co-exist- 
ence in the I .S. ol lice and pa) tv. 

Commercials: Designer Saul Bass 
will animate White King Soap com- 
mercials to he produced 1>\ Play- 
house Pictures of Los Angeles . . . 

Pintoff Productions will produce a 
new Admiration Cigar spot . . . 
'Music Makers will do scoring for 
Pharmacraft's Fresh through J. Wal- 
ter Thompson and for Johnson & 
Johnson baby shampoo via Young vV 
Ruhicam. 



Stricth personnel: Stan Smith 
resigned .1- sales \ .p. ol ' >ffi< ial I ilms 
. . . Sam Gang becomes internation- 
al sales director of Bi 1 nard L. Schu- 
bert . . . Marvin M. Grieve ap- 
pointed sales \ .p. ol Guild !■ ihn- . . . 
I)e Von Stanfield, James Sea* 
strand and Verland Whipple 
formed Destinj Productions with of- 
fii es at I General Sei \ ice studios in 
Los Angeles . . . Gilbert S. Cohen 
appointed film traffic manager ol 
ABC Films. 



NETWORKS 



From M$C T\ "s viewpoints, the 
issues involved in the walkoul 
this week of NABET over the 
Paris-taped Dave Carroway pro- 
gram poses iwo serious threats to 
the l\ industry. 

These are: 1 1 ' The imposition ol 
the fealherhedding principle (forced 
employment of unnecessar) union 
people) even when it come-- to pro- 
graming abroad and (2) the attempt 
of American unions to assume con- 
trol over the international operations 
of American tv producers. 



( M ai ithmel 11 - note in the dispute 
about 30 technu iana are emploj ed on 

the < ,ai 1 OWa) show in NBC Studios, 

w hereas onlj nine \ \l>l . I membt 1 - 
were tal en along to pat ticipate in the 
taping abroad. 

\lti Radio's Chicago division 
contributed quite an arra] ol 
new business this week. I he ac- 
counts include: 

• Wig-Chalmers, oul of Berl S. 

Gittins, Milwaukee, renewed the I arm 

and Home Hour again foi 52 week-. 

• The Hill> Graham Evangelical 
Association renewed Horn oj Deci- 
sion for 52 week-. 

• Evinrutle Motors l( i.tmei- 
Krasselt, Milwaukee 1 is buying par- 
ticipations in Munitoi l"i 13 weeks 
starting July; Mogen l)a\i«l for 13 
participations beginning late this 
month. 

• Mida- Muffler has renewed 

\ eu s On The Hour. I his is a , a 
age buj 12 News one week, and I I 

the next, for -(< week-. 

• Morton Salt (NL&B) renewed 
for ~Y2 week-, their fi\e-minule topic 
For Tdi/m -how. 

• Turtle Wax (Bozell & Jacobs), 



WILLIAM TELL 

WILLIAM TELL PACKS THE BIG SELLING PUNCH! And whatta punch! Socko in Cleveland with audi- 
ence research comments like this: "well acted," "wholesome," "fast- moving," "suspenseful. " 
Socko in Pittsburgh, Houston, and all around the country for such advertisers as Meadow Gold 
Dairy, Fisher Foods, and Lucky 7 Stores. And soon William Tell comes out swinging in 5 new markets 
via the Triangle stations who've just bought into the big excitement. What's more, William Tell 
keeps punching for advertisers with unprecedented merchandising, on-the-air, at-point-of-sale, 
everywhere! And it's all part of the buy... when the buy is "THE ADVENTURES OF WILLIAM TELL" 

'For the full report, contact NTA Research Department. 






NTA PROGRAM SALES 



SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 





A DIVISION OF NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES, INC., TEN COLUMBUS CIRCLE. NEW YORK 19. JU0S0N 2-7300 



67 






*ptoft 

summer ' radio goes where 





the family goes 








People do take vacations, and 
Radio goes along. 

That's why SPOT RADIO is so nec- 
essary in your summer media plans. 

Reach people-wherever they are, 
at home or on vacation- with SPOT 
RADIO. 



I 




SPONSORED BY MEMBER FIRMS OF 




*--.) 



Avery-Knodel Inc. — John Blair & Company — Broadcast Time Sales 

Thomas F. Clark Co. Inc. — Harry E. Cummings — Robert E. Eastman & Co. Inc. 

H-R Representatives Inc. — The Katz Agency Inc. — McGavren-Quinn Company 

The Meeker Company Inc. — Art Moore Associates Inc. — Richard O'Connell Inc. 

Peters. Griffin. Woodward, Inc. — William J. Reilly, Inc. 

Radio-TV Representatives Inc. — Weed Radio Corporation — Adam Young Inc. 



MAY IS NATIONAL RADIO MONTH 



Li riiihl participations in News of 
the World starting 13 May. 

• Plough, Inc. i Lake-Spi r<>- 
Shurman, Memphis I for participa- 
tions in My True Story for 52 weeks. 

Network tv sales: On ABC T\ . 

General Tire \ Rubber ( I) \rc\ i for 
Fop Pro Col], beginning 8 June; 5- 
I)a\ Labs l < ire\ I to co-sponsor Leave 
// to Beaver starting 2 July: Polk 
Miller Products Corp. (Aver I for 
participations on American Band- 
stand and Jubilee USA . . . On CBS 
TV, Renault of France (NL&B) for 



half-hour, alternate week on Play- 
house 90. 

On NBC TV, Congoleum-Nairn 

(KM&J I for Dough-Re-Mi, Queen for 
a Day and Tic Tac Dough — amount- 
ing to one-quarter hour per week for 
nine weeks; Raleigh Cigarettes 
(KM&Jl for a total of 77 quarter 
hours for 52 weeks on Dough-Re-Mi, 
Concentration and Tic Tac Dough; 
on the Jack Paar Show, Alberto- 
Culver I Wade I. for 66 participa- 
tions starting in August and running 
through January: ReaLemon (Lili- 
enfeld & Co.), renewed for 52 partici- 



Pacquins' Dollar buys More 



on WKOW 



". . . Your personal 
calls on all the major 
chains and supermar- 
kets resulted in excel- 
lent cooperation at the 
retail level. Coupled 
with better shelf posi- 
tion and display in all 
major outlets, this ef- 
fort strengthened even 
further the effective- 
ness of the Pacquins 
campaign, . . . Mer- 
chandising letters to 
grocery and drug out- 
lets and the display 
window at your down- 
town studio were a tre- 
mendous help." 

Edward Berthold 
Sales Representative 
PACQUINS' 




PW 



Thank you, Dick Driscoll, at 

Wm Esty for the opportunity 
of proving for the second con- 
secutive year that your client's 
dollar buys more on WKOW. 

Ben Hovel 
General Manager 



Represented \alionaih l>\ lleudle\-Rced 



WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 



TV-Q 



RADIO- 10 KW- 1070 



pations effective August: Jim Wade 
Foot Powder ( Svolos Agencv, 
Shreveport), for 26 participations in 
Paar and Today for the summer 
months. 

Fall programing business for 

ABC T\ : Diamond Head, private 
eye series running an hour on 
Wednesdays, for American Chicle, 
Carter and Whitehall . . . Man From 
Black- Hank, adventure series sched- 
uled Fridavs 8:30 for Miles Labs and 
R. J. Reynolds. 

Net tv programing notes: Stripe 

Playhouse for Lever (JWT) will al- 
ternate with Lux Playhouse beginning 
this Friday (8), CBS TV, 9:30 p.m. 
. . . John Daly and the News moves 
to a new time period on ABC TV 
next Monday (11) — 6-6:15 p.m. . . . 
The Sam Levenson Show began sub- 
stituting for Arthur Godfrey, on five 
days a week on CBS TV. The Tues- 
day night Godfrey slot will be re- 
placed by Peck's Bad Girl. 

New network affiliates: The Ari- 
zona Network, with 12 stations, to 
ABC Radio. Also to ABC: WBBC, 
Flint, Mich, and KBND. Bend. Ore. 
... To the Keystone Broadcast- 
ing System: KONI. Phoenix; 
KMOP." Tucson: KENL, Areata, Cal.; 
KCRE. Crescent City, Cal.: WGML, 
Hinesville. Ga.: WBIE. Marietta. Ga.; 
KAOL. Carrollton. Mo.; WKRK, 
Murphv. N. C: WBLA . Springfield. 
0.: KCUL, Ft. Worth-Dallas; WBKV. 
West Bend. Wis. 



RADIO STATIONS 



WCCO. Minneapolis, showed last 
weekend what radio can do 
toward untangling a puhlic-in 
volved knot regarding daylight 
sa> ing time. 

After theatre owners and two the 
atre unions had induced the state's 
chief justice to enjoin the adoption ol 
daylight savings, WCCO's new-ta(l 

went into action. 

It broadcast "beep-ed" protesi 
from listeners, with the result that 
countj hoard- in the Minneapolis-3 

Paul metro area voted to stick alo« 

with the old DST arrangement, e\ei 
though the state legislation had m 
journed Friday night (24) withol 
reapproA ing the time change. 

I .1 1 1\ lliis week the state's altome\ 



70 



SPONSOR 



2 MAT 105? 



general was Irving to induce the chiel 
justice i<> reconsider and withdraw 
his decree. 

Eladio-TS News Directors Vsaocia- 
tion lias distributed a compila- 
lion <if reprints <»t news stories 
and editorials dealing with the 
Vi'.i'. ruliiiji which requests equal 
lime for all political opponents. 

The industry is seeking to have 1 1 1 i — 
(tilling recinded before the l (, (>(> cam- 
paigns begin. 

lie's tak«'ii a stand against insur- 
ance companies requesting free 
time to oppose the proposed tax on 
them: 

Ben Ludy, president and general 
manager of Morth Texas Radio 
Inc. ikWIT. Wi.hila Falls), in re- 
sponse to a memo from the Tempor- 
ar\ Committee on the Taxation of 
Mutual Life Insurance ('■<>. s: 

"My feeling is that it i- controver- 
sial and consequentl) the companies 
should hu\ an) propaganda that the) 
are asking radio to ,^i\c them. 

"We are not giving away our 
time anv more than insurance 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
GAL FRIDAY 

Attractive young woman 

wishes to apply the di- 
plomacy, aplomb and TV 
industry know-how gained 
when NBC Continuity 
Acceptance Editor (4 
vis.) , to position as ad- 
ministrative Ct.iI Friday to 



TV or Advertising Exec. 



Call PL-96800, Ext. 36 



Companies are gi\ing BWa) their 

protection and savings. 

Ideas at work: 

• To plug thcii "smoothes! sound 
around," W<»^. Ubany-Schenectady- 

Troj jusl c ludcd ii- search tor 

"The Smoothest V oice Ground. 
Some L,400 promotional recordings 
were made b) women visiting the 9ta- 
tion's booth at the Greater Ubanj 
Home Show ami the) were then used 
as on-the-air promotions for the 
station. 

• K.SON, San Diego, chose its 
first place winner lii-t week for its 

"\l\ Motnnn Listens to KSON" con- 
test. The winner, a four-\eai old, for 
his taping ot his mother's listening 
habits. His prize: $1,000 college 
scholarship. 

• WW J, Detroit, began participat- 
ing in "Operation World Wide" last 
week. The project: A short-wave 
transmitter, sent overseas, will air 
messages from the Motor City's mili- 
tary personnel stationed at distant 
bases to their families in Detroit. 
These inteniew- will be used on 
station newscasts. 

Station purchases: WDAT. Day 

toiia Beach. Ida.. 1>\ CBS broadcaster 
Walter Cronkite, VBC stockholder 
John Mark and Washington ad man 
James Beattie . . . The interests in 
KAFY, Bakersfield and KFXM, San 
Bernardino, to Howard Tullis and 
John Hearne. from L. Benton Pasch- 
all. At the same time. Baseball ob- 
tained the interests of the former 
parties in KWIZ. Santa Ana . . . 
WHYE, Roanoke, Va., to Jon Holi- 
da) and Joseph Mullen, for $125,000. 

Tliisa "n* data: The University of 
Pennsylvania has established The 
Vnnenherg School of Communica- 
tions to ""encourage vision and re- 
sponsibilit) in the mass media sys- 
tem." \ 1"> Ma) deadline is set for 
fellow -hip opportunities for people 
with media experience . . . Last week 
marked the formal opening of 
WFDS-FM at L130 E. Cold Spring 
Lane, in Baltimore . . . To promote 
its newest personalit) Sand) Jack-on. 
KOIL. Omaha i- distributing bags of 
-and with the note attached: Sand) - 
back and KOIL's got him . . . \nni- 
versar) note: KKI. Los Vn^eles. 
marking it- 37th year tin- month. 

Kudos: The new-room ot WERE, 



-l-.iNs.u; 



2 may 1959 



HOT SPRINGS 

ARK. POP. 33,800 

is LARGER 

than cities 

twice its size 

\Ioie gen. iik Inlsc. sales ill. in 

MIDI, WD. I exas Pop. 64,700 

More di Ug StOl c -.1 le^ than 1 . \ 
CROSS] . Wise. Pop. 7'.). 7(hi 

More apparel store sales than 
Sheboygan. Wis. . Bop. «H.«MI0 

Ask us why 



KBHS 

5000 watts at 590 kc 

113 3d St., Hot Springs, Ark 



Represented by: 

Thomas Clark, N.Y. 

Sears & Ayer, Chicago 

Clarke Brown, South 



WDBJ- 

For 3 5 Years 
No. 1 in the 

Roanoke 

Market! 



WDBJ has been on the air In 
Roanoke. Virginia continuously 
since 1924. In every audience 
survey ever made in those 35 
years, WDBJ has always 
proved to be first in coverage 
and audience. 

We look forward to serving' 
even better in the future our 
ions' list of loyal national ad- 
vertisers who demand the best 
in radio promotion. 

Ray P. Jordan, 

V. P. Broadcasting 

Times-World Corporation 



CBS RADIO 



Roanoke, Virginia 

AM • 960 Kc. • 5000 watts 
FM • 94.9 Me. • 14,000 watts 

r PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD. INC. 
National RtprtstnUtivts 



71 





My Mommy Listens 
to KFWB 

Working mommies or home- 
type mommies ... they all 
look to KFWB as the daddy 
of all radio stations in the 
Los Angeles area. 
Once again Pulse reports 
KFWB first among all Los 
Angeles stations . . . night- 
time and day-time. Hooper 
says it this way: KFWB has 
more audience than all 
four networks combined! 
Buy KFWB. ..first in Los 
Angeles. It'sthethingtodo! 




6419 Hollywood Hiv.l Hollywood 28 HO I MM 



Mllll H PUiCIlL. President and Gen Manager 
mi 10« N Hll« Sales Manager 
Represented nationally by I0MI BLAIR I CO 



Cleveland won recognition this week 
from Radio Press for its feed to the 
news network on the Youngstown, O. 
jail escapees . . . WSPA, Spartan- 
burg, cited with the 1958 Public In- 
terest award from the National Safetv 
Council . . . WPEN, Philadelphia, 
for its daily editorials, awarded by 
the United Businessmen's Association 
. . . Jack Prince, account executive 
at WTAR, Norfolk, received the Dis- 
tinguished Salesman's Award from 
the Hampton Roads Sales Executives 
Club ... To WWJ, Detroit, six 
awards and to WJR, Detroit, two 
awards from the Detroit Advisory 
Council on Educational Tv and Radio. 

Station staffers: Mitchell Lewis, 

named national director of advertis- 
ing and publicity for The McLendon 
Corp. . . . L. C. Redmon, named 
v.p. and general manager of WLAP, 
Lexington, Ky. . . . John Foster, to 
general manager. WKNE, Keene, 
N. H. . . . Joseph Wolfman, to 
station manager. KSON, San Diego 
. . . Erwin Markle, to program di- 
rector. KFSD, San Diego . . . Eu- 
gene D'Angelo, named local sales 
manager, WTVN, Columbus, 0. . . . 
Andrew 7 James, to sales manager 
and Maury Rosen and Art Doty to 
the sales staff of KWKW, Pasadena 
. . . Ralph Vogel, to farm director. 
KIOA, Des Moines . . . Bill Conine. 
to account executive at KTUL, Tulsa 
. . . John Dingetlial, to national 
sales coordinator for radio sales at 
KYW, Cleveland . . . Retired: John 
Carey, for the |iast 24 years sale- 
manager of WIND. Chicago. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Television Advertising Repre- 
sentatives, Inc., is the first rep to 
equip itself with a videotape 
machine. 

Mow the mechanism will be used: 

1) Run oil I or prospective buyers 
tapes of personalities on stations rep- 
resented l>\ T\ \K and which show 
how each "I the pei -dualities handle 
a commercial. Or how a commercial 
is inserted in their -how s. 

2i For demonstration purposes 
when program people from TvAR sta- 
tions hold seminar- lor New "^ oris 
agencies on local programing. 

,'i) OITer an opportunity for New 
^otk agencies to decide whether to 



adopt live commercials done for them 
on a TvAR stations for national use. 

Adam Young, head of the rep 
firm bearing his name, before 
the Ohio Association of Broad- 
casters last week, highlighted the 
ways a rep could be useful in creat- 
ing or improving the reputation 
of a station: 

1 l Make the station aware of the 
problems surrounding the devel- 
opment of a good image; 

2) Show how to present the story of 
the station in its best light; 

3) Suggest how to best promote the 
station through both advertising 
and direct mail and 

4) Suggest how to give the kind of 
service that agencies and adverti- 
sers expect. 

The Station Representatives Asso- 
ciation will hold its 1959 Advertis- 
ing Awards luncheon this Thursdaj 
(7) at the Waldorf-Astoria in New 
York. 

The two awards to be made: SiKer- 
nail Time Buyer of the Year and Cold 
Key award. 

Rep appointments: KXLY-AM & 



University of Oregon — fugene, Oregon 




Nearly ]/4 of Oregon's 
buying families watch 

KVAL-TV 

KPIC-TV 



The only clear-picture in the 
Eugene - Springfield - Roseburg 
market is on KVAL-KPIC. One 
order to your Hollingbery man 
or Art Moore and Associates 
i Portland-Seoitlei covers both 
stations. 



KVAL-TV fugene 
NSC Affiliate Channel 



E 



. KPIC-TV Roseburg ■ Channel 4 

I Sot.lllt. 



72 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 



TV, to ll-K Reps and H-R Tv, Inc. 

Strictly personnel! George 
Crumbley, Jr., named sales manager 
of the Southeast for CBS Radio Spat 
Sales . Hob Maji-iioir. trans- 
ferred to the Los Angeles office ol 
pranhara . . . Carl Getchell, Jr., 

to t\ account executive in the New 

■Cork office of George I*. Hollingberj 
Co. . . . Edward Voynow, president 
of Edward Petr) \ Co., named to the 
board of directors "I the I nion 
Asbestos \ Kuhher Co. 



INTERNATIONAL 



The tv audience in France is 
rapidh expanding, with the Dum- 
per of sots registered this vear up 
50% over 1958. 

The figures, as of 31 Januarj 1959: 
1,023,808 t\ sets, reaching an estima- 
ted audience of 3.5 million. 

Five new transmitters have been 
placed in operation since November 
1958, bringing the total to 27, with 
an additional L3 transmitters planned 
for operation within the next year. 



()n the radio front, the number of 
registered sets a- of 31 Januarj hit 
the 10.7 million mark. 

British advertisers ami agenc) 
executives will he advised about 
making commercials more effectively 

from I .S. researcher Horace 

Schwerin. 

The occasion: \n all-da) seminar. 

sponsored l>\ Associated Y\ Ltd.. 
to be held .'* June at the Royal Festi- 
val Hall on the south bank of the 
I hames. for some 1.000 (op execu- 
tives of the I nited Kingdom and the 
Continent. 

They're opening new branches: 
Grant Advertising, in Durban, 

I nion of South \frica and Hamburg, 
Germain, the latter to be managed b\ 
Rudolph Jon Wille . . . Y-R. in 
Geneva. Switzerland, to he under the 
supen ision of ^ &R Ltd., London and 
headed In Colin Mclver. 

Agency appointments: .). Lyons & 
Co. Ltd., food manufacturer, dis- 
tributor and tea shops operator, to 
Lam he & Robinson-Benton & 



Bowles Ltd., London a subsidiary 
«.f B&B, N.w York . . . Veedol GmbH, 
a Bubsidiai j oi the I ideM atei OiH !o., 
to Grant, Hamburg, <>eimaHy. 

Personnel notes from farawa\ 

places: Peter Lome, named man- 
aging director ol McCann-Erickson 
Ltd.. London ... J. II. Vaamonde, 
new \ .p. and genei al manage] ol 
V*vH. Mexico and Gene Austin, to 
manager ol VM! - Puerto Rico office 

. . . Jolin Devlin, to the London ac- 
count executive sialf of Robert Otto 
& Co. . . . Ralph Smith, to general 

assistant of the RPC Radio Network 
of Panama . . . Leu Stein, to general 
manager of \\ST\. St. Thomas, \ it 
gin Island-. 



TV STATIONS 



A survey of youth shows on tv by 

the National Audience Hoard 
came up w iih this Ending : 

There is obviously no crisis at 
all in children's programing on 
tv. 




The face that 

launched 

a million sales: 

GLENCANNON 

From Beer (Olympia) to Bakery 
Products (Ho/sum), the ore-acce pted 
"Oscar" -"Tony" -"Emmy" Award 
Winning face, name and talent of Mr. 
Thomas Mitchell is launching 
sales— big sales for advertisers all 
over the country. As Glencannon, 
in the hilarious half -hour series of 
high comedy on the high seas, 
this beloved character stands ready 
to steer sales your way, too. 
What's more f Thomas Mitchell will 
sell for you personall y, at the 
all-important point of sale. 

NTA Program Sales 

A Division of National Telefilm Associates. Inc.. 

Coliseum Tower, 10 Columbus Circle, New York 19. IV 2 7300 



SPONSOR • 2 MAY 1959 



73 



The Board sent a total of 1201 bal- 
lots to ci\ ic leaders and to representa- 
tives of the General Federation of 
\\ omen's Clubs as its latest project 
for producers, sponsors and network 
officials. 

The survey's choice for the 10 top 
children shows: Captain Kangaroo, 
Mickey Mouse Club, Father Knows 
Heat, Fury, American Bandstand, 
Laurence If elk. Disneyland, Leave it 
to Beaver. Garfield Goose and The 
Perry Como Show. 

Westerns, despite their popularity 



with the older set. were considered 
inappropriate for children be 

cause of "their overdependence on 
violence and aggression." 

In line with the current expan- 
sion of Corinthian Stations opera- 
tions, and the recent addition of 
KBET-TV. Sacramento, the group has 
appointed Herman W. Land to the 
newly-created post of director of 
public relations and special projects. 

Land has been v. p. and executive 
editor of Television Magazine for the 




NCS Nc. ) «.... WWTV dortlme »o.Ur 
circulation In to,090 hornet and night- 
time ...II, circulatioi In KM, I 30 horn., 
In 36 Northern Liwu Michigan countiec. 



WKZO TV — GUANO lAPIOS KALAMAZOO 

WKZO «A0IO — KALAMAZOO HATTLE CHEEK 

WJEE DAOIO — GUANO DAPIDS 

VrMEf FM — GUANO HAPIDS KALAMAZOO 

WWTV — CADILLAC. MICHIGAN 

KOLN TV — LINCOLN, NEBIIASKA 

Alloc .otrd with 
WM»D 1A01O — PIO.IA. ILLINOIS 
WMtO TV — HOIIC ILLINOIS 



WWTV, Cadillac, offers lower cost coverage 
and far greater popularity than any other ad- 
vertising medium in Northern Lower Michigan! 

WWTV covers 36 Michigan counties in which 
you'd need 13 daily newspapers and 16 radio 
stations to get the same kind of audiences. And, 
in this area, Pulse rates WWTV first in 152 
out of 168 quarters surveyed! 

Add WWTV to your WKZO-TV schedule and 
get all the rest of outstate Michigan worth 
having. // you want it all, give us a call! 




WWTV 



316.000 WATTS • CHANNEL 13 • tjfj' TOWM 
CIS and ABC In CADILLAC 

Serving Northern Lovuer Michigan 



past three and one-half years and pri- 
or to that, he was on the staff of 
SPONSOR. 

Ideas at work: 

• W BKB, Chicago telecast the 
<it\"s seventh annual "clean up dav 
parade" — lead by Mayor Daley and 
star Forest Tucker. An estimated 10,- 
000 Chicagoans participated in the 
massive demonstration. Sponsors of 
the clean-up show: International Har- 
vester Co.. Chicago and Suburban 
Refuse Disposal Association and the 
Carpet and Rug Cleaners Institute. 

• Programing ideas: WRCA-TV, 
New York began its new public serv- 
ice series last week — Direct Line. The 
show will provide the public with a 
direct telephone hookup to political 
figures in the studio, so that they can 
be questioned personally. 

• Success story : Three Cedar 
Rapids service stations used three 
spots on WMT-TV to promote their 
giveaway of a chick with each gas 
purchase. Result: Stations pumped 
a 519? increase in gallons of gas 
over the weekend. 

• WKOW-TV. Madison, Wis.. 
has been promoting a "Junior Savers 
Club" for the Bank of Madison, via 
its Roy Rogers Shoiv. Last week, sta- 
tion held on-the-air ceremonies hon- 
oring the 1.000th Saver, with the 
bank's president calling the response 
"far greater than our expectations." 

Financial report: The Metropoli- 
tan Broadcasting Corp's gross reve- 
nue for 1058: $14,428 million, com- 
pared with $10,201 million in 1957. 

Station purchase: Fisher's Blend 
Station, Inc.. for one-third of the out- 
standing stock of Fishers Tv Co. - 
operators of K0M0-TV, Seattle. 

Thisa 'n data: WRAL-TV, 

Raleigh. N. C. dedicated its new build- 
ings last week with NBC's Robert 
Sarnofi cutting the video tape that 
opened the structure . . . Westing- 
house Broadcasting Co. has ac- 
quired the Felix The Cat cartoon 
sci ics. to be produced by Trans-Lux 
Tv Corp. . . . The winner: KABC- 
TV, Los Angeles, first place in the 
General Mills-Beth ("rocker "Protein 
Plus" merchandising contest . . .1 
WUC, Pittsburgh, has purchased a 
weekh t\ column in M) Tri-State 
area newspapers promoting station 
personalities and programs . . . C.api- 



71 



SPONSOK 



2 may 1959 



tal <'iii«'s T\ Corp. is establishing 
national headquarters in New \ ork 
. . . Martin Code] opened his new 
■Sees al tin' Solar Building, in W ash- 
ington. D. ('..... \\ I. W -T, Cincinnati 
is presenting its entire Dateline I . V 
-ciir- id educational >tat i< >n \\('l T- 
I \ lor re-runs. 

Anniversary notes: To celebrate its 
loth year, WKRC-TV, Cincinnati 
begins a full schedule of station pro- 
motions — climaxing in October 1>\ 
the opening <>f new studios . . . WK.C- 
T\ . W ashington, to mark its first 
year in new headquarters, flew a 
group of New ^ ork Cit) ad execu- 
tives to tin- cit) via "special plane" 
to celebrate an open house. 

Kudos: Bill O'Donnell, sports 

editor of WSYR-TV, Syracuse won 

the 1959 TV Trophy for excellence in 
sports coverage by the Roman 
Catholic Diocese of Syracuse . . . 
Gabe Pressman, of WRCA-TV, 
New ^ ork. won the George Polk Me- 
morial Award for "outstanding tv re- 
porting" .... Harold Meier, assist- 
ant news director. KSTP-TY. Minne- 
apolis-St. Paul, named winner of the 
1959 Sisima Delta Chi award. ^ 



■IV 

Hi'.'- 

i-.i 

. 

rt""t 
,Lui 
VBG 
n the 

ruteil 

lied l 
i-Sta* 

;tal * 

Ul'i 
l'13f 



PAT WEAVER 

I Cont'd from page 35) 

Margaret (Peggy) Stewart has been 
his secretary close to 20 years. Lew 
Marcy. a serious-minded New Eng- 
lander. serves as a kind of business 
manager and mentor of Pat's tv-pack- 
aging activities. The) require little 
direction. The teamwork minimizes 
dictation and gives Pat plenty of time 
to operate on his own. He likes to 
putter around on his typewriter, turn 
out numerous short memos, see old 
friends who come calling, and take 
time out to quip with his staff or the 
boys at Dine and Kalmus. a firm he 
affectionately nicknames Whine & 
^ lumper. 

Pat s talent for name caricature 
and light banter, alreadv famous in 
the industry, hasn't dimmed. Abe 
Lastfogel, kingpin at William Morris, 
is so important, says Pat. that he 
must he called "Firstfogel." At one 
midtown office where he went \isiting 
he addressed himself to the reception- 
ist with these words. "Take me to 
your leader." 



rail, buoyant, youthful-looking Pal 
generally make- an indelible Lmpres- 
-ion. I lie-e da) - he's often -een 
striding (some sa) flying) along Park 
\\enue. pausing en route to greel ac- 
quaintances with a bon mot. He 
spreads his charm, cheer, and occa- 
sional!) his biting wit. wherever he 
goes, oblivious of station or rank. 

Pat is a free-wheeler in place as 
well as thought. He Ends more time 
now for skiing in Switzerland or Sun 
Valley. Recentl) he Hew to Spain to 

discuss a television idea with Mike 
Todd. Jr. He takes off for Puerto 
Pico or Honolulu at the drop of a 
hat. Hut on weekends he leaves his 
Sutton Place apartment with his wife 
Betty, a beautiful red-headed English 
ex-actress, for no further than their 
home at Oyster Bay. Long Island. If 
the dav is right sun-worshipper 
Weaver will tilt his face upward and 
soak in the rays, a habit he also en- 
joys on his apartment terrace, the ski 
slopes at Sun Valley, the beach at 
\\ aikiki. or wherever opportunit) 
beckons. Sheer joy for Pat is loung- 
ing in a broiling sun engaged in 
bright repartee. 

Pat eschews formal business func- 
tions whenever he can. He hates 
stuffiness. When the Weavers enter- 
tain or are entertained I which is fre- 
quent I his magic spell quickly per- 
meates the atmosphere and loosens 
up those around him. 

If Pat sounds like a perennial 
Dartmouth sophomore you get the 
impression that his present modus 
operandi hasn't diminished this qual- 
it\. Yet he is firm and positive in his 
habits and principles. He rareh 
drinks, never smokes or swears: lives 
an orderly life: invariabK calls his 
secretary "Miss Stewart." despite bis 
flamboyant tendencies leans toward 
close friends who like to think I Tom 
Dewey, his lawyer, is one example I : 
and still lashes out with caustic com- 
ment when aroused. His son and 
daughter, ages about 10 and 12. have 
known what it means to feel the pa- 
ternal wrath. 

Like another prominent broadcast- 
er who doesn't need the security of a 
regular job — Lou Cowan of CHS T\ 
— Pat may yet In* tagged again. If 
so, like Cowan, it will be the chal- 
lenge that gets him. Otherwise he'll 
probabl) go on being the most suc- 
cessful unemplo\ed network presi- 
dent around, and with hardb an ulcer 
to show for his labors. ^ 



jMS 

1490 kc 
102.7 mc 

represented 
by 

Stars 
National, Inc. 


is the 
most 
effective 
sales force 
in the 

CHICAGO 

NEGRO 

MARKET 

with 

Chicago's Greatest 

Air Salesman 


flf 3 B,LL 

mf hili 



Same ownership as WDIA— Memphis 



PACT! 




56.1% 



SPONSOR 



2 may 1959 



\ 



BIGGEST SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
IN AMERICA IN MARKETS 
OF 3 OR MORE STATIONS* 

Once again, KROD-TV proves that it 
is America's best TV buy with an ov- 
erwhelming share of audience in a 
competitive, ^station. 3-network. all- 
VHF market (•AKB, November 1958) 

See your Branham man for full details. 

KRQDTir 

Cit MMiip N-'w*.* • 0«- - « • t *+** t.,.. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE BRANHAM COMPANY 

75 



LOCAL TV 

i Cont'd from page 37) 

amount of such programing now on 
the air. 

• In answering a question on what 
was an "acceptable "' cost-per-1.000- 
per-commercial-minute for a half hour 
show, 43% picked the $2-2.99 range, 
33% chose the $1-1.99 range, 19% 
said $3-3.99 and 5% would accept 
$4 or more. 

Panelists were given the oppor- 
tunity to express their views on local 
tv and a considerahle number did so. 
Here are the gist of some comments: 

Sam B. Vitt, media supervisor, 
DCSS, New York — "Opportunities 
for local programing are greater than 
ever. There are three reasons: 111 
an increasing number of advertisers 
are scrutinizing sales by region more 
closely; (2) there is more attention 
I icing paid to 'editorial compatibility' 
of programing and product: (3) 
many products need a full minute to 
tell their story." 

Ben Leighton. timebuyer, camp- 
bell-Mithun. Minneapolis: "The best 
local programs are in the field of 
service and information, rather than 
entertainment." 

Marshall Hawks, radio/tv direc- 
tor. Emery Advertising. Baltimore — 
"Local personalities can be built to 
rival the popularity of any network 
personality." 

Gertrude B. Murphy, v.p. for radio/ 
tv. Long Advertising, San Jose, Cal. 

"It is regrettable that the economics 
of television have practically elimi- 
nated the local live program of seri- 
ous content." 

Roland C. Gallman, timebuyer, 
EWR&R, Los Angeles— "The best 
entertainment on independent station* 
IS feature film." 

Max Tendiieli. v.p.. Weiss & Geller, 
New York — "UnfortunateK . live local 
l\ programing has disappeared be- 
cause of filmed programs. Even 
though live programs may have lower 
ratings and cost more, it is essential 
that a station devote time to local live 
programing to maintain a character 
oi image. Many advertisers want to 
use established local personalities for 
commercials and merchandising. 

Alice J. Wolf, timebuyer, \.W. 
\\ei. Philadelphia — "Some of the 
lowest rated shows have produced the 
lie»l results for clients."' 

I 'redei ick S ^ affc. |>i esident, I , 
Yaffe & Co., Detroit — "There is room 
for more personalities." ^ 



76 



HANK FROM THE BANK 

{Cont'd from jxige 45) 

here, with a "whole family" approach. 

By now, it was no exaggeration to 
say that Hank was the best-known 
hanker in town. At a regional dinner 
of some 300 bankers, it's reported 
that more than one of them was try- 
ing to fathom Hank's charm. Few of 
his associates could give the answer: 

"Hank is hardly the popular con- 
ception of a banker," says exec v.p. 
Nash. "It's this very fact that makes 
him stand out in people's minds and 
makes them want to come in." 

Says WTRF-TV station manager, 
Bob Ferguson, "It's hard to sav just 
what Hank's gimmick is. Suffice it 
to say, Hank is the gimmick. His ap- 
proach has created the best friendli- 
ness and service image in the region." 

"All I know," volunteers station 
continuity chief Don Murdock, "is 
that Hank-from-the-bank certainlv 
brings my commercial copy to life." 

Hank himself sums up his ap- 
proach thus: "I like to talk to peo- 
ple. And they tell me the right people 
are out there. So I talk to them." 

Audience selection, the bank real- 
izes, is as important as a good pitch- 
man. And Half Dollar knows just 
what audience it is pitching. 

While the spot schedule was spo- 
radic, the bank achieved consistency 
with the 26-week sports schedule. The 
bank's identification with sports got 
a big assist from West Virginia Uni- 
versity who ended the season tied 
with Louisville for first place. Excite- 
ment was high in Wheeling, and Half 
Dollar wanted to cash in. 

WTRF-TV worked out a line relax 
from WAVE-TV. Louisville, where 
the play-offs were to occur and ar- 
ranged for the local Pepsi-Cola bottler 
to pick up half of the game. 

\\ heelings excitement was at an 
all-time high, and so was Hank's. One 
colleague reports, "the first da) he 
left more words than usual out of 
the commercial." The second dav he 
was too excited to talk about the bank 
at all. "Just come into the bank on 
Monday and I'll tell you all about it." 
he said. People came in. So did cards, 
letters, telegrams saying thanks for 
the games. 

West Virginia was runner-up to 
Louisville. Bui the Half Dollar Trust 

and Saving* Hank of Wheeling ended 
the basketball season with resources 
and deposits of $16,760,000. ^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Cont'd from page 55) 

consistent community co-operation 
and has built a solid reputation for 
considering the needs of its audience 
then I would say that one of the 
most important categories of proper 
station operation had been fulfilled 
and the property would be well worth 
further investment investigation. 

Obviouslv the market must be 
worth buying in in the first place. 
This would take into consideration 
local competition in the market, the 
potential future in terms of market 
growth, how the particular property 
you are interested in has fared in 
terms of sales against the competition, 
what the programing policies have 
been and how they have been ac- 
cepted: what the potential of the 
market is in terms of buying power 
of the tv audience. 

As far as facilities are concerned, 
facilities can be purchased, new per- 
sonnel can be hired, new studios 
built, a great splashy promotional 
and advertising campaign launched. 
This is onlv money — but as that well 
known cigarette ad says "if it hasn't 
got it here, it hasn't got it." The here 
once again being the prestige and be- 
lievability of the property in ques- 
tion. If this believability is not part 
of the prospective buyer's inheritance 
he'd best remember those famous 
Latin words, "Caveat Emptor." 

If the previous management has 
left evidence of this believability then 
it is a question mainlv of dollars and 
cents and profit and/or loss. Then 
your programing, promotion, adver- 
ting, equipment, personnel, etc., can 
be adapted to serve the audience. 

1 have found that a fairly good 
yardstick for determining this intan- 
gible of audience loyalty, is the ex- 
tent to which a station goes bev ond 
the call of dutj in the areas of re- 
porting public service events, cover- 
age of local news, sports and coin- 
niunitv movements. When members 
of a community talk to each other 
about item* of local interest gathered 
from the local tv station and uses this 
information for arguments either pro 
or eon you know that the >lalioii 
has believability. 

\ml once that rapport between sta- 
tion and audience has been reached 
the rest is a matter of proper applica- 
tion of the routine operations I 
broadcast management. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 MAY 1059 



■ 




for every 10 TV homes in the 
Indianapolis Trading Area . . . there 
are 14 in its Satellite Markets. 

Think of this rich Mid- Indiana area in these terms 
and you will come up with some surprising ideas about 
television and your market. Here's the place to test 
"regional umbrella coverage". . . . get real penetration 
and impact at low cost. Why is this Indianapolis 
television market different ? 

Where else will you find satellite markets that are 33% 
richer and 50",, bigger than the Metropolitan Trading 

only basic NBC coverage of America's 
13th TV Market — 760,000 TV homes. 



° °^^° INDIANAPOLIS-Majorretailareafor18richer-than- 

average counties. 1.000,000 population— 350,600 families with 90% 
television ownership! 



o 



11 SATELLITES-Each market within WFBM-TV's 
verified coverage . . . Marion • Anderson • Muncie • Bloomington 
. Vincennes • Terre Haute • Danville, Illinois • Lafayette • Peru 
• Logansport • Kokomo. 



Zone itself? Where else do you find such a widespread 
area covered from one central point . . . and by just 
one station with no overlapping basic affiliates of the 
same network ? 

WFBM-TV dominates Mid-Indiana, because it is the 
only basic NBC outlet penetrating this market. Nielsen 
Coverage Study =3 confirms these facts . . . and we're 
proud of our ARB. Let us show you how to test 
regional marketing ideas with amazing results. 

Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 




OUR 10TH 
ANNIVERSARY 



PONSOR 



2 may 1959 



77 



REOR 

DERE 





says Gunnar 0. Wiig, Station Manager 

WROC-TV 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Warner Bros, features really 
rack up the ratings in any time 
slot, day or night. According to 
Mr. Wiig of WROC-TV they're 
ordered and reordered by sta- 
tions . . . and by sponsors. 

"We first bought one 
group of 58 Warner Bros, 
features last October. The 
reaction, both by audi- 
ences and by sponsors, 
was so good that we have 
now bought the entire re- 
maining portion of the 
Warner Bros, library — 
over 600 films. They're 
great! " 

Warner Bros, features have 
what it takes to make a station 
manager happy — big Holly- 
wood stars— great track records 
— real sponsor appeal. 

Fatten up those lean periods in 
your programming with profit- 
able Warner Bros, features. 

u.ci.a. 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 

NEW YORK, 345 Madison Ave., MUrray Hill 6-2323 
CHICAGO, 75 E. Wacker Dr., OEarborn 2-2030 
DALLAS, 1511 Bryan St., Riverside 7-8553 
LOS ANGELES, 9110 Sunset Blvd., CRestview 6-5886 

78 







Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Bernard Howard lias formed a national 
radio and l\ station representatives com- 
pany: Bernard Howard & Co., Inc. — head- 
quartered at 20 East 46th Street. New York. 
He will also set up hranch offices in Chic- 
ago. Los Angeles. San Francisco and At- 
lanta. Howard has been in the national 
reps field for some 13 years. For the past 
six and one-half vears, he was instrumental 

in organizing and later serving as an officer of Stars National. 

Prior to that, he was eastern sales manager with Forjoe & Co., Inc. 

Ralph M. Baruch has been appointed di- 
rector of International sales for